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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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I just heard of this new pasta called great Farro (italian in origin, I believe). It is supposed to be wheat free. Can anyone tell me if this is the case?

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Farro is an unhybridized form of wheat, with a hearty, nutty flavor, which has been grown throughout Europe for centuries. Today, with the renewed interest in traditional and organic foods, farro is featured on the menus of many of the best restaurants in Italy, and is rapidly gaining popularity in the United States. Farro is a cereal grain. What differentiates farro from wheat is its husk. The farro husk adheres to the grain, just as in barley and oats. All modern hard wheat is descended from farro. Farro is packed with vitamins and minerals, as well as oils which enhance its fibrous properties. Specifically, farro is loaded with Vitamin E, which acts as an antioxidant and is key in fighting disease and staying healthy, but is difficult to find in many food sources. Although not a complete protein source, farro becomes one when combined with legumes, which is typically done in Tuscan kitchens.

Copied and pasted this off a website.

To me, it sounds like wheat??? :blink:

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Howdy - Although I don't have a gluten allergy myself - I've done a lot of homework on the topic for some close friends. Farro Pasta is a pure pasta made from Emmer Wheat - yes wheat. So folks who have Celiac Disease should probably avoid it. I will say though having tasted Emmer wheat pasta - it's awesome! if you don't have the allergy - then by all means check it out. I'm not an expert by any means but all of the research I've done and everything I've read still classifies it as a wheat product. As a side note - and not to push it - I recently bought some of this pasta on-line at an Italian website - http://www.ceriellofinefoods.com/c/farro-e...heat+Pasta.html - just in case you're looking for more info on it.

Happy Holidays!

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Farro is made from a very close relative of wheat.

It is NOT gluten free.

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