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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Honey Comb
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11 posts in this topic

HI,

I had some honey comb on Sunday Morning and 40 minutes after eating eat I was sick to my tummy until Monday morning. Not sick enought to keep me down, but enough to feel blah. Was I glutened?

Nicole

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If I remember right, that cereal has oats. I would have to look it up to be totally sure. You were probably glutened. I totally stay away from oats. There is no way to guarantee that there isn't cross contamination with them. Also there are some celiacs that react to the protein in oats. So, personally, I steer clear. It sounds like you need to also :)

-Jessica :rolleyes:

HI,

I had some honey comb on Sunday Morning and 40 minutes after eating eat I was sick to my tummy until Monday morning. Not sick enought to keep me down, but enough to feel blah. Was I glutened?

Nicole

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If you're talking about the cereal, it's not gluten-free.

richard

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Yup, stay away from that cereal--it does have oats, which are mostly likely contaminated in this country, even if pure oats don't give you a reaction.

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I guess this would be an appropriate thread to ask this question????

Being newly diagnosed and not "sick" or symptomatic as a rule because I was only tested because of family history, I thought if you were not "sick" so to say that oats would be okay????? Is it true that if you are originally diagnosed after being sick that you should stay off oats for 6 months and then slowly add them back to see if it bothers you? What do you experts think? Thanks

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here is a good thread on the oats debate you can read: http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=14052&hl= So you were tested and all your tests were negative and you have no noticeable issues with gluten? (Wasn't sure from your post)... There are two things with oats. 1st, most oats are contaminated in the US--just part of the growing, processing/milling etc...so, most aren't safe for those on a gluten-free diet. I also have a study I can e-mail you, if you like, on 3 major brands and their results from batch testing for gluten. (they each had dectectable levels of gluten) 2nd, there is a small percentage of people who do react to pure oats, but at this point there is no way of testing to see who those people are. and IMO the only way to know if you are truly reacting to oats if you are eating them all the time would be follow up testing, endoscopy, blood work etc. b/c sometimes internal damage can be occurring without an exterior manifestations or symptoms. but if you are someone who does not react to pure oats, you have to refer back to #1. at this point i have not as of yet seen or been convinced of a completely gluten-free, non-contaminated brand of oats. these are my thoughts until more research and testing really comes out on this topic. hope that answers the question or part of it !

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I as a rule do not eat a lot of gluten products because I have been following a modified South Beach phase 1 which includes mostly dairy, meats, veggies etc and I chose not to eat breads, pastas and grains to help with weight loss. I have been following this for 2 plus years. I was only tested because 4 first degree relatives were positive.

A few days prior to testing I started to eat bread and pasta again so I would not get negative results. My IgA was 43 with a less than 25 negative. My MD said given my family history and dietary restrictions prior to testing she is sure I have celiacs.

I added gluten to my diet for 2 weeks and found gassy uncomfortable lower abdominal discomfort- not severe- I have gone back to basic gluten free with oats only and have had no symptoms.....yet....it has been about 10 days. Thanks for your info. I will look at it.

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Ingredients
Corn Flour, Sugar, Whole Grain Oat Flour, Whole Grain Corn Flour, Honey, Salt, Yellow 5. Bht Added To Packaging Material To Preserve Product Freshness. Vitamins And Minerals: Niacinamide (B Vitamin), Reduced Iron, Zinc Oxide (Source Of Zinc), Vitamin B6, Vitamin A Palmitate, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Thiamin Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Folic Acid (B Vitamin), Vitamin B12,Vitamin D.

 

Though the cereal is manufactured on equipment that processes wheat.

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Ingredients

Corn Flour, Sugar, Whole Grain Oat Flour, Whole Grain Corn Flour, Honey, Salt, Yellow 5. Bht Added To Packaging Material To Preserve Product Freshness. Vitamins And Minerals: Niacinamide (B Vitamin), Reduced Iron, Zinc Oxide (Source Of Zinc), Vitamin B6, Vitamin A Palmitate, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Thiamin Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Folic Acid (B Vitamin), Vitamin B12,Vitamin D.

 

Though the cereal is manufactured on equipment that processes wheat.

 

Welcome HoneyBunny!

 

Just wanted to let you know this thread is seven years old...doubtful that the original posters are still about.  It is good to update product info == so thanks!

 

Hang out....glad to see you here.

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Ingredients

Corn Flour, Sugar, Whole Grain Oat Flour, Whole Grain Corn Flour, Honey, Salt, Yellow 5. Bht Added To Packaging Material To Preserve Product Freshness. Vitamins And Minerals: Niacinamide (B Vitamin), Reduced Iron, Zinc Oxide (Source Of Zinc), Vitamin B6, Vitamin A Palmitate, Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Thiamin Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Folic Acid (B Vitamin), Vitamin B12,Vitamin D.

Though the cereal is manufactured on equipment that processes wheat.

Regular commercial oat flour is not safe due to contamination with wheat.
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Here's how goofy I am... I thought she meant real honey comb, you know, from a bee hive. I was ready to say "Of course it is gluten free." 

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