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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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Guest BERNESES   
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And as a former high school teacher, I can tell you that you are TOO YOUNG for Altoids. :P

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celiac3270    4

I concur most vehemently ;), which is why my signature reflects my anti-Altoid stance. Youth these days are getting too loose with their Altoids, and I'm representing the call for a reform of these ways. Altoids need to be taken seriously. :D

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skoki_mom    2
I concur most vehemently ;), which is why my signature reflects my anti-Altoid stance. Youth these days are getting too loose with their Altoids, and I'm representing the call for a reform of these ways. Altoids need to be taken seriously. :D

LMAO!! I wonder how long until Karen sees it........... I for one will never look at Altoids the same way.....

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Franceen    1
LMAO!! I wonder how long until Karen sees it........... I for one will never look at Altoids the same way.....

Parden my naivete, but what is wrong with Altoids. I am surrounded by a lot of them these days - especially the Wintergreen. I'm not too young for them! (54) but I'm not in love with them - I eat one or two every once in a while, normally on a plane. I will have to go look at ingredients! Are they full of Gluten? Or Cassein? Or Soy. I am only gluten-free. The rest of the allergens are ok for me (so far).

Franceen

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ravenwoodglass    1,218
Parden my naivete, but what is wrong with Altoids. I am surrounded by a lot of them these days - especially the Wintergreen. I'm not too young for them! (54) but I'm not in love with them - I eat one or two every once in a while, normally on a plane. I will have to go look at ingredients! Are they full of Gluten? Or Cassein? Or Soy. I am only gluten-free. The rest of the allergens are ok for me (so far).

Franceen

The Altoids I picked up and looked at the other day had wheat listed as an ingredient, don't know if it is in all flavors but read carefully.

Oh and I'm not sure but I think it is what you can do with Altoids in your mouth as an enhancement that she thought celiac3270 might be too young for.

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Guest BERNESES   
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Oh and I'm not sure but I think it is what you can do with Altoids in your mouth as an enhancement that she thought celiac3270 might be too young for.

That is correct- celiac3270's generation is far too promiscuous with their use of Altoids. I used to teach middle school and ah-hem "Altoids" were the activity of choice due to the lower "risks" associated with them.

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Lisa    457

Yes, this is an old joke floating around here. It has been adult talk with mild suggestiveness.

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Yep, definitely something I will never live down for the rest of my celiac.com life! :lol: celiac3270, I am very proud of you and your anti-Altoids stance. I wish more young people had your morals........ B) (I am married, I can be "immoral" in that department! :lol::lol: )

Hugs.

Karen

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celiac3270    4

Of course--when you're married and probably more mature, you are free to make those decisions. I am taking the stance that people of my age aren't capable of making such decisions, for a number of reasons. For example, there is an inherent mental difference between the mind of a juvenile and that of an adult. The juvenile has an underdeveloped pre-frontal cortex (part of brain responsible for planning, rationality), and thus, makes especially active use of the amygdala (responsible for impulsive decisions). People at this age can't make rational decisions regarding such things.

Therefore, although peppermint Altoids are helpful in alleviating nausea due to motion sickness and the like, their use does not (or rather, should not) extend beyond that for those in juvenility. That's all! :P

For those still in the dark:

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...indpost&p=94588

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J.P.    0
Hi Ehrin,

sorry my analogy didn't sit well with you. My purpose is not to analyze diabetes, my only point is that diseases are highly variable from person to person. Not everyone is the same. Diabetes, breast cancer, high blood pressure, you name it . They all vary in severity, and the treatments are tailored to the severity. Not paying close attention to your salt intake when your BP is 138/85 is not the same as when your BP is 180/100. The consequences are very different. Now please, no hypertension sufferers need to reply, the analogy may also not be perfect, but the POINT is relevant.

So I did have a backslide slightly today, maybe those corn pops this morning. Now the advice to try to eat simple meals and not tempt fate seems the only way to go for the next few months. I wish I had more time for self preparing meals, but I'll do my best.

Hey Fiddle Faddle, don't be offended, but we appear to think the same way!

:lol:

I would like to re-emphasize that my personal concern is not short term symptoms (that is important but secondary). My concern is long term ramifications of less than strict gluten avoidance. I can regulate it to whatever controls my bowel symptoms and that will be just fine (I'm not saying I am going to do this, but just thinking about it). If I am at risk for other problems by doing this, then it is not wise. I don't believe there is clear evidence of what this type of approach to diet will do to long term risks of osteo or intestinal lymphoma which are my chief concerns. And again this is my own personal assessment for my own body. I am not advocating anything just letting my thoughts out to stimulate discussion.

-Hi just started reading this, but not the whole thing.

I have non-celiac gluten intolerance. I am a Medical Technologist (run a hospital laboratory). I figured out the gluten intolerance all on my own. That is not to say that I didn't see lots of doctors along the way for lots of different problems (my medical record is on to it's 3rd volume and the first one started at age 22 when I joined the military). I think that gluten intolerance can start without you even knowing it, cause damage slowly, and you think that you just feel that way because that's normal. My health deteriated over a long period of time, when I was in college my once thick beautiful hair began to fall out and now my white scalp shows through my dark hair. I do not cheat on my diet, having to travel and eat out makes me nervous. When other people prepare food you don't know what you are going to get. I was at a conference and the very first night I got exposed and I don't know what it was in. My stomach will expand as much as 5 inches, and let me tell you that hurts. I don't get D... most of the time I get constipated. I even had a hospital stay due to a bowel obstruction. I couldn't tell that gluten was my problem because I ate it all the time. When you don't eat it you feel normal, then you can feel the difference better than you could when you ate it all the time. If your body is feeling bad already, eating a little more may not make it worse and you won't be able to tell the difference.

I figured this out last year and have lost 15 lbs, my stomach doesn't expand everyday, everything is more regular. I'm sad for what I lost, but after all these years I'm glad that now I can do something to feel better. I'm one of those people diagnosised with Fibromylagia and constipation predominant irritable bowel, and chronic fatigue. I had half my thyroid removed due to a hyperactive nodule and there were lymphcyte infiltrates (white blood cells) characteristic of hasimotos disease (my sister, aunt and grandmother all had goiters). I'm hoping that the other half will be ok now that I'm on this diet, so far it is working in the normal range and I feel so good. I would encourage anyone with any form of gluten intolerance to stick to the diet.

Is there a good way to figure out what other food I may be sensitive too other than trial and error? I can't eat citric acid (oranges and rice cakes with citric acid irritate my stomach and cause rashes), food with blue no. 1 (marshmellows and red drinks) also irritate me

J.P.

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-Hi just started reading this, but not the whole thing.

I have non-celiac gluten intolerance. I am a Medical Technologist (run a hospital laboratory). I figured out the gluten intolerance all on my own. That is not to say that I didn't see lots of doctors along the way for lots of different problems (my medical record is on to it's 3rd volume and the first one started at age 22 when I joined the military). I think that gluten intolerance can start without you even knowing it, cause damage slowly, and you think that you just feel that way because that's normal. My health deteriated over a long period of time, when I was in college my once thick beautiful hair began to fall out and now my white scalp shows through my dark hair. I do not cheat on my diet, having to travel and eat out makes me nervous. When other people prepare food you don't know what you are going to get. I was at a conference and the very first night I got exposed and I don't know what it was in. My stomach will expand as much as 5 inches, and let me tell you that hurts. I don't get D... most of the time I get constipated. I even had a hospital stay due to a bowel obstruction. I couldn't tell that gluten was my problem because I ate it all the time. When you don't eat it you feel normal, then you can feel the difference better than you could when you ate it all the time. If your body is feeling bad already, eating a little more may not make it worse and you won't be able to tell the difference.

I figured this out last year and have lost 15 lbs, my stomach doesn't expand everyday, everything is more regular. I'm sad for what I lost, but after all these years I'm glad that now I can do something to feel better. I'm one of those people diagnosised with Fibromylagia and constipation predominant irritable bowel, and chronic fatigue. I had half my thyroid removed due to a hyperactive nodule and there were lymphcyte infiltrates (white blood cells) characteristic of hasimotos disease (my sister, aunt and grandmother all had goiters). I'm hoping that the other half will be ok now that I'm on this diet, so far it is working in the normal range and I feel so good. I would encourage anyone with any form of gluten intolerance to stick to the diet.

Is there a good way to figure out what other food I may be sensitive too other than trial and error? I can't eat citric acid (oranges and rice cakes with citric acid irritate my stomach and cause rashes), food with blue no. 1 (marshmellows and red drinks) also irritate me

J.P.

Did you have thyroid antibodies, too? Just curious, as it sounds like we have VERY similar symptoms except I never had IBS or Fibromyalgia. I never thought of citric acid--I wonder if I react to that, too. Did you ever get a weird rash on just your arms? I could have sworn mine was DH, but the biopsy was negative. I never knew rice cakes HAD citric acid! :blink:

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i know it's been since april 2006, but was wondering what ever happend to radman. how is your glutenfree journey going? are you more sensitive now? or do you allow small amounts of gluten in your diet?

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kareng    1,992

i know it's been since april 2006, but was wondering what ever happend to radman. how is your glutenfree journey going? are you more sensitive now? or do you allow small amounts of gluten in your diet?

"He" hasn't been on the forum in 7 years. I doubt he will answer you.

You can click on a person's name/ picture and see when they were last on.

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