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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

What Do You Do When You Get Glutened?
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57 posts in this topic

Hey, don't this'll be as fun as my other topic!

I've managed to eat some gluten (yet again!) within the last 48 hours. I've had minimal D but quite a lot of gas/bloating/funny noises in my tummy and I'm brain-fogged and down.

I was wondering if any of you know of any helpful action to take rather than just waiting to get over it? I've taken vitamins, echinacea, acidophilus and aloe vera juice (as I do every day) but they don't seem a huge help. Sometimes, when I get really bad D I want to take Imodium but I would have thought that would just keep the gluten in my system longer, potentially doing more damage. Right now, I'd love a dose of colonic irrigation- I've never tried it, but I've started dreaming about it! I wondered if anyone knew of any preparation which helps when you get glutened, and which is a bit more practical in the short term than a colonic!

Thanks for sharing x

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I always drink a red bull at the first sign of glutening (I'm having one now!). The caffene brings the energy up to a halfway decent level, and all the b-vitamins help the brainfog. Immediatley after glutening, it's my best weapon. I'm sure the niacin does something good, too. I have problems taking regular vitamins, so it really works for me.

Also a healthy dose of my bentyl and some tylenol help the tummy. I would say immodium is fine.

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I wish I had better advice for this one.....I generally end up just suffering through it, but I know some people swear by anything with ginger.....if you get D immodium will help.......and there has been discussion about nuleve for cramping. Hope you feel better soon!

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Thank you both! I wasn't sure red bull was gluten-free, I'll try some. I might mention those drugs to my doctor when I next see him.

I've heard a lot about ginger. That's an old Indian remedy for an upset stomach. I'll have a go. :)

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I carry cards of immodium in my wallet.

There is a solution which I call the "Roto rooter" technique.

Basically, you eat WAY TOO DAMN MUCH FIBER, and keep eating it. It's like.... ramming a toilet plunger through a garden hose. pushes everything before it. A very large bowl of brown rice seems to work.

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So the fiber helps you combat the glutening effect?

]

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I've tried fiber before and it didn't do anything for me once I already had C. A Dr. told me that fiber can actually have the opposite affect if you are already C too......I would procede with caution.

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echinacea, if you've been glutened, may not be a good idea, since you are boosting you're immune system, but it's an immune response gone awry that's the problem.

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echinacea, if you've been glutened, may not be a good idea, since you are boosting you're immune system, but it's an immune response gone awry that's the problem.

Ooooh! Good point!! Think I'll try fibre as suggested.

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I always drink a red bull at the first sign of glutening (I'm having one now!). The caffene brings the energy up to a halfway decent level, and all the b-vitamins help the brainfog. Immediatley after glutening, it's my best weapon. I'm sure the niacin does something good, too. I have problems taking regular vitamins, so it really works for me.

Also a healthy dose of my bentyl and some tylenol help the tummy. I would say immodium is fine.

NUTRITION FACTS & INGREDIENTS

Red Bull Energy Drink

Ingredients: carbonated water, sucrose, glucose, sodium citrate, taurine, glucuronolactone, caffeine, inositol, niacin, D-pantothenol, pyridoxine HCL, vitamin B12, artificial flavours, colors

Nutrition Facts: Serving Size: 8.3 fl. oz Servings per Container: 1 Amount per serving: Calories: 110 Total Fat: 0g Sodium: 200mg Protein: 0g Total Carbohydrates: 28g Sugars: 27g

Red Bull Sugar Free

Ingredients: carbonated water, sodium citrate, taurine, glucuronolactone, caffeine, acesulfame k, aspartame, inositol, xanthan gum, niacinamide, calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hcl, vitamin b12, artificial flavors, colors

Nutrition Facts: serving size 1 can; calories 10; fat 0g; sodium 200mg; total carb 3g; sugars og; protein less than 1g; niacin 100%; vitamin b6 250%; vitamin b12 80%; pantothenic acid 50%

RED BULL WILL MAKE ME VIOLENTLY SICK. I SEE WHY!

I've heard a lot about ginger. That's an old Indian remedy for an upset stomach. I'll have a go. :)

GINGER MAKES THINGS WORSE FOR ME.

SIMPLE IS BETTER IN MY CASE. I POP A COUPLE IMMODIUM PILLS OR LIQUID, AND THEN I DRINK A BOTTLE OF PEDILYTE. PEDILYTE IS THE SAFEST WAY TO REPLACE YOUR LOST ELECTROLYTES LOST FROM STEATORRHEA-DIARRHEA. A SMART DOCTOR WILL TELL YOU THAT. IT HAS HELPED ME MORE THEN ANYTHING! TRY IT -- YOU'LL SEE...

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Ms Sillyak: What's pedilyte? I had to google it. Is it something to do with infants, something meant to help babies? (I'm in Britain- never heard of it). Thanks for the advice, though. It's very welcome! X

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Ms Sillyak: What's pedilyte? I had to google it. Is it something to do with infants, something meant to help babies? (I'm in Britain- never heard of it). Thanks for the advice, though. It's very welcome! X

pedialyte.com/

www.pedialyte.com/thisispedialyte/variety.cfm#singles

advantages

Here is a free sample offer

I don't know where this site is from but useful info.

This stuff is a life saver for me. If I'm laying on the bathroon floor after a seizure and steatorrhea diarrhea that has me weak and frail I drink this stuff. It's like a miracle treatment. I keep a bottle un-opened under my bathrrom sink, so I can get to it easy from the floor. When I feel like I'm shaky, or weak or like I have no blood in my veins, this perfoms miracles for me.

Yes, it's for babies. Some other companies make it in the health-food stores, but they have additive I don't want. The one I drink is the un-flavored one (clear). This is better at replacing electrolytes, more so then gatorade or sports drinks. It's expensive $4 or $5 a bottle. But it really really works. TRY IT!

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Thank you! I'll see if I can get hold of some. Take care. X :)

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I got glutened yesterday and today I was craving bread... so I made gluten free pantry muffins (added banana's for potassium) and then for lunch had brown rice and steamed broccoli... I've been drinking a ton of water... the "D" seems to have stopped but now I am all crampy and bloated and freakin ITCHY!!! at first I couldn't see a rash but now I've got a visible bumpy rash all over my body...

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Actually the idea of the heavy fiber to is push everything out of your intestines as quickly as possible. Something like a couple of bowls of brown rice will do that. It won't clean the blood, but the sooner it's out of your intestines the better.

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A mom whose blog I read posted the following recipe for homemade Pedialyte. She and her DH came up with this by reading labels (and maybe the internet), to save money -- because what pedialyte actually is, is cheap if you mix it yourself. Obviously this might or might not be worth fooling with (and I'm not sure if it would keep unrefrigerated forever), but FWIW (the below is almost verbatim from her blog) --

---------

Basics: Mix --

one level teaspoon of salt

eight level teaspoons of sugar

one liter of clean drinking water

Among its medically useful ingredients, Pedialyte also contains sodium citrate, one of the components of citric acid, and potassium. If your child can keep food down without vomiting you can supplement your homebrew with some mashed banana at mealtimes; if not, you can add 1/2 c. orange juice to the homemade solution.

We found that adding

3 tablespoons of Splenda

1 packet unsweetened Kool-Aid, fruit punch flavor

...improved the flavor's drinkability, as seen from a toddler's perspective.

----------

Your mileage may vary!

-- Alexandra

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it depends on what your symptoms are- for me, it's usually nausea, vomiting, headaches, constipation and mood swings. I take Tylenol for the headaches, this stuff called Ipecachuana for the nausea (i used to take Phenergan but it was WAY too constipating). I may also take a little extra anxiety medicine and if I get really "stopped" up i take this stuff called CleanseMore by a company called Lame Advertisement.

I also make ssure I eat- rice, gluten-free toast, something mellow. I don't feel like eating but I feel worse if I don't.

it depends on what your symptoms are- for me, it's usually nausea, vomiting, headaches, constipation and mood swings. I take Tylenol for the headaches, this stuff called Ipecachuana for the nausea (i used to take Phenergan but it was WAY too constipating). I may also take a little extra anxiety medicine and if I get really "stopped" up i take this stuff called CleanseMore by a company called Lame Advertisement.

I also make ssure I eat- rice, gluten-free toast, something mellow. I don't feel like eating but I feel worse if I don't.

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It's a homeopathic remedy made by a company called Boiron and I know that ipecac induces vomiting but this does the opposite for me. And the good thing is it doesn't constipate me or make me even more tired like the phenergan did.

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A mom whose blog I read posted the following recipe for homemade Pedialyte. She and her DH came up with this by reading labels (and maybe the internet), to save money -- because what pedialyte actually is, is cheap if you mix it yourself. Obviously this might or might not be worth fooling with (and I'm not sure if it would keep unrefrigerated forever), but FWIW (the below is almost verbatim from her blog) --

---------

Basics: Mix --

one level teaspoon of salt

eight level teaspoons of sugar

one liter of clean drinking water

Among its medically useful ingredients, Pedialyte also contains sodium citrate, one of the components of citric acid, and potassium. If your child can keep food down without vomiting you can supplement your homebrew with some mashed banana at mealtimes; if not, you can add 1/2 c. orange juice to the homemade solution.

We found that adding

3 tablespoons of Splenda

1 packet unsweetened Kool-Aid, fruit punch flavor

...improved the flavor's drinkability, as seen from a toddler's perspective.

----------

Your mileage may vary!

-- Alexandra

Speaking of mileage varying...

The original research from which pedialyte later was developed was intended to produce a recipe for Oral Rehydration Therapy that mothers in the third world could make themselves to use to save the lives of their children with severe diarrhea. They found that any sort of sugar or soluble starch would work, with a lot of leeway on the proportions. I have never purchased the product. I have made my own from 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon sugar, and 1 quart of water.

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When I get glutened, I suffer severe abdominal pain. I'm doubled over, in bed and usually end up just sobbing because it hurts so bad. Saturday, I had what I thought was a gluten free "Coco Loco" bar, and I was a mess. I was so desperate for a remedy, I took a Darvocet. In about 8 hours, I was in good enough shape to get out of bed. I'm not sure if this is for everyone, but it helped me.

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When I get glutened, I suffer severe abdominal pain. I'm doubled over, in bed and usually end up just sobbing because it hurts so bad. Saturday, I had what I thought was a gluten free "Coco Loco" bar, and I was a mess. I was so desperate for a remedy, I took a Darvocet. In about 8 hours, I was in good enough shape to get out of bed. I'm not sure if this is for everyone, but it helped me.

I hear stories like this, and I wonder if celiac is what I have. I get mild-medium intestial discomfort, and about 30 very distinct kinds of bad poo. I can describe, (But won't) atleast 10 kinds of bad poo off the top of my head. And I think I have it bad, and then someone comes along with symptoms so far in excess of mine that it makes me ponder if it's the same illiness.

Even so, I hate my poo.

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I always drink a red bull at the first sign of glutening (I'm having one now!). The caffene brings the energy up to a halfway decent level, and all the b-vitamins help the brainfog. Immediatley after glutening, it's my best weapon. I'm sure the niacin does something good, too. I have problems taking regular vitamins, so it really works for me.

I looked at the vitmins in RED BULL and I was suprised. -- niacin 100%; vitamin b6 250%; vitamin b12 80%; pantothenic acid 50% -- I know when I get a B-12 shot, it has folic acid and pantothenic acid too. The pantothenic acid makes a big difference for me. Like ChelsE said the caffene lifts her energy.

I can see how it works. I'm just hypersenstive and am extremely limited and cautious about the natural flavor and natural ingredents, they hide so much there that makes us sick and we don't know it until later.

I carry cards of immodium in my wallet.

I do the same thing - along with an anti colon-spazm pills.

This isn't a repair stategy, but something I considered doing today to try to prevent someone scattering pizza and doughnut crumbs around the kitchen with gay abandon - I seriously considered asking my DH to look in the toilet before I flushed it. I didn't do it. But ... I really feel like saying "Look!!! See how abnormal this is!!! How do you think I feel with that coming out of my bottom???"

Matilda -- Honestly I like the way you think. I think we should show them -- I know I feel the same way!

It's called steatorrhea diarrhea: fat in the feces which are frothy and foul smelling and floating; a symptom of disorders of fat metabolism and malabsorption syndrome. Foul-smelling loose bulky pale stool... People who don't have this have no-idea what we go through!

Basics: Mix --

one level teaspoon of salt

eight level teaspoons of sugar

one liter of clean drinking water

Among its medically useful ingredients, Pedialyte also contains sodium citrate, one of the components of citric acid, and potassium. If your child can keep food down without vomiting you can supplement your homebrew with some mashed banana at mealtimes; if not, you can add 1/2 c. orange juice to the homemade solution.

We found that adding

3 tablespoons of Splenda

1 packet unsweetened Kool-Aid, fruit punch flavor

...improved the flavor's drinkability, as seen from a toddler's perspective.

Sounds good -- but watch out for words like natural ingredients or natural flavors. They are allowed to trick us using those words they hide. Kool-Aid is is no no for me. And Spenda triggers my migraines... But your recipe for homemade Pedialyte looks safe. Thanx

Also one other thing I don't know if any of you follow that school of thought. DISTILED WATER ONLY. I noticed a big difference only drinking distilled water instead of spring water. It has too many minerals our sick bodies don't need to process. Other people have said they feel better with distilled too.

When I get glutened, I suffer severe abdominal pain. I'm doubled over, in bed and usually end up just sobbing because it hurts so bad.

I know your pain...

I hear stories like this, and I wonder if celiac is what I have. I get mild-medium intestial discomfort, and about 30 very distinct kinds of bad poo. I can describe, (But won't) atleast 10 kinds of bad poo off the top of my head......

Even so, I hate my poo.

People have no idea what it's like and we all have varing degrees over time...

Life with ste·a·tor·rhe·a!

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I looked at the vitmins in RED BULL and I was suprised. -- niacin 100%; vitamin b6 250%; vitamin b12 80%; pantothenic acid 50% -- I know when I get a B-12 shot, it has folic acid and pantothenic acid too. The pantothenic acid makes a big difference for me. Like ChelsE said the caffene lifts her energy.

I can see how it works. I'm just hypersenstive and am extremely limited and cautious about the natural flavor and natural ingredents, they hide so much there that makes us sick and we don't know it until later.

With all of your other intolerances, I would definitely try to figure out what is in the natural flavors. I can tell you with certainty that Red Bull is gluten-free, but I don't know about everything else.

One crisis at a time, for me anyway!

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