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Tai Chi - Qigong

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I just got a Tai Chi instructional tape to try out. Does anybody else practice this form of exercise??

Here is a brief description:

T'ai chi, considered by many to be a gentle martial art, is a wonderful form of mental and physical stimulation, and great for your overall health. The term "T'ai chi" refers to a perfect balance between the yin and the yang - the two forces of the universe. People who practice tai chi perfect a series of motions that flow into one another very smoothly and gracefully, while the body is held straight and upright. The movements are gentle, continuous, and circular, exercising every part of the body equally.

T'ai chi is a beneficial form of exercise, especially for those with osteoarthritis. It can help you strengthen your leg muscles, improve your posture, and promote balance, flexibility, and mobility. It also can teach you to relax and focus, even while executing the moves, and is a way to harmonize the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. In addition, it helps to develop concentration and coordination.

I thought it might be good for the times I really have lots of fatigue and can't manage my regular walking and yoga routine.

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I love tai chi. I have only taken one course a long time ago but I have the book of all the "moves." You really do get great muscle toning and strength from tai chi. It is also good for decreasing stress. I really need to find the time to start practicing it again.

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I just got a Tai Chi instructional tape to try out. Does anybody else practice this form of exercise??

Here is a brief description:

T'ai chi, considered by many to be a gentle martial art, is a wonderful form of mental and physical stimulation, and great for your overall health. The term "T'ai chi" refers to a perfect balance between the yin and the yang - the two forces of the universe. People who practice tai chi perfect a series of motions that flow into one another very smoothly and gracefully, while the body is held straight and upright. The movements are gentle, continuous, and circular, exercising every part of the body equally.

T'ai chi is a beneficial form of exercise, especially for those with osteoarthritis. It can help you strengthen your leg muscles, improve your posture, and promote balance, flexibility, and mobility. It also can teach you to relax and focus, even while executing the moves, and is a way to harmonize the musculoskeletal and nervous systems. In addition, it helps to develop concentration and coordination.

I thought it might be good for the times I really have lots of fatigue and can't manage my regular walking and yoga routine.

hi. tai chi is pretty hard to learn well from a videotape or book. a teacher is really the only way to go. i took a tai chi/qigong class for a short while. i got into qigong a few years back and hope to get back to a class soon. it's much easier to learn qigong from a video than tai chi's more complex forms. some good videos:

A.M. CHI FOR BEGINNERS

http://www.amazon .com/gp/product/094567102...glance&n=404272

QIGONG:TRADITIONAL CHINESE EXERCISES FOR HEALING BODY, MIND, & SPIRIT http://www.amazon .com/gp/product/156455393...glance&n=404272

i never got that far in tai chi but i can say that qigong is the best practice i've ever done - even better than the yoga i used to do.

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Just so you know, there are styles of physical yoga practice that are much like this as well. You might consider looking into "restorative yoga", originally developed by Judith Lassater, or other forms. But I know a people who greatly enjoy tai-chi as well.

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hi. tai chi is pretty hard to learn well from a videotape or book. a teacher is really the only way to go. i took a tai chi/qigong class for a short while. i got into qigong a few years back and hope to get back to a class soon. it's much easier to learn qigong from a video than tai chi's more complex forms. some good videos:

A.M. CHI FOR BEGINNERS

http://www.amazon .com/gp/product/094567102...glance&n=404272

QIGONG:TRADITIONAL CHINESE EXERCISES FOR HEALING BODY, MIND, & SPIRIT http://www.amazon .com/gp/product/156455393...glance&n=404272

i never got that far in tai chi but i can say that qigong is the best practice i've ever done - even better than the yoga i used to do.

Thanks everybody for the feedback.

GravStars,

The tape I got is by Living Arts as well, but it is titled "Qigong for Energy". I hear several big cities, maybe even some of the smaller communities too, offer free tai chi/qigong classes through different organizations. Thanks for the info.

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Good to note for us celiacs, too, is that both Tai Chi and Yoga are bone building weight bearing exercise. Yeah!

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My husband used to be a Issunryu karate instructer, so he has taught me a little. Then I got a Tai Chi dvd (yang style) and tried it out. I liked it a lot! I was living in the middle of the desert at the time with no instructers around. but my husband has practiced it at the dojo so he was a lot of help.

A lot of people do not realize the martial applications of the forms. It's really relaxing too.

I found yoga, and boxing to both be great addidtions to Tai Chi as well. I've only been using the eliptical trainer lately. I really want to get back into Tai Chi again, and boxing.

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