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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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i have got to do a school project and i was wondering if anyone could give me info

chers :unsure::huh::o

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What is your project on? We need some help about what you need help on...

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Go to celiac.com that describe what celiac is and how to treat it. That would give you a start.

richard

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i need help on knowing how you cope with it & what products are available on the market :huh:

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Guest jhmom

Reading through the message board may be a good start for you. Under "gluten-free foods, shopping" you will see a list of products that are available to people on a gluten-free diet.

Also if you click on the "site index" on the left of the screen it will list a lot of links that you could check out.

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Hardnut: Just curious, but how did you come up with a topic about how people deal with celiac and what products (I assume you mean gluten free) are on the market? Do you or anyone in your family have celiac disease? As suggested, just reading our posts esp. under the 'coping' topic should give you a pretty good idea about how we cope (or don't cope sometimes :( ). Also under the site index, the topic 'mainstream foods which are gluten free' as well as the topics of safe and forbidden foods are lists of appropriate gluten free foods which we can safely eat to avoid further celiac damage while healing from gluten damage.

BURDEE

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