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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
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Flu-like Symptoms From Quitting Smoking
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5 posts in this topic

I've quit smoking several times in the past and my experience up until this time has always been that dealing with the anxiety for the first week or so was the worst part of quitting. I don't smoke when I hike or paddle, so I generally quit every time I had an overnight trip -- the exercise alleviated any accompanying stress.

Now, however, I'm in a different position and, although I've been under a LOT more stress than usual recently, it's been very easy just to quit this time without needing to go out into the woods to do so. Anxiety hasn't felt like a huge issue because this feels like nothing compared to gluten-related anxiety.

However, I was smoking more than usual for a few months post-breakup and my body has a bit of recovery to do -- I've started having major flu-like symptoms which I know are nicotine withdrawal symptoms -- a sore throat, fatigue, achey & drainy feeling ears, etc. (I'm pretty sure I haven't been exposed to anything).

Does anyone have recommendations for dealing with these -- or know how long it takes to get through them? I'm trying to drink lots of water and, of course, I'm doing the usual supplementation things I always do -- but are there specific foods or supplements that might help this process along? Part of me just wants to get into bed with some chicken soup, but I don't know whether that's the best way to treat this or not.

I'm getting lots of exercise -- running daily and doing lots of yoga.

eleep

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It sounds like you are doing everything right.

Just remember to value the experience.... your goal is to feel normal again but your body has a feeling of normal associated with nicotine. Any nicotine you have now will just reset the process .....

The worst physical part is already over.... what you are left with are ghost memories of how to "feel good" again.... its just your body playing tricks on you. It can be very convincing but its not smart.... it just replays the same "give me nicotine" ... imagine it is a little "devil" in your stomach... the little devil that nagged you for every cigarette ... right now that little Devil is dying and getting weaker and weaker, its fighting for its life because it knows a little longer and it will be gone.... so its trying harder than ever but its getting weaker and weaker.

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Grrr, this feels hellish. I have absolutely no interest in smoking again, but there are all sorts of emotional things coming up that the smoking was kind of holding at bay these past few months. On the other hand, I still look better than I ever have.

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Grrr, this feels hellish. I have absolutely no interest in smoking again, but there are all sorts of emotional things coming up that the smoking was kind of holding at bay these past few months. On the other hand, I still look better than I ever have.

Try personifying that "little devil" .. learn to detest it ... but don't diefy it. All it is is a nagger... it nags at you and hopes to break down your resolve. It has it in for you.... but each and every day you ignore it it becomes weaker, its not a deity, its a parasite, just one you have created but it took years to grow and it will take a week or month to really kill it.

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I've quit smoking several times in the past and my experience up until this time has always been that dealing with the anxiety for the first week or so was the worst part of quitting. I don't smoke when I hike or paddle, so I generally quit every time I had an overnight trip -- the exercise alleviated any accompanying stress.

Now, however, I'm in a different position and, although I've been under a LOT more stress than usual recently, it's been very easy just to quit this time without needing to go out into the woods to do so. Anxiety hasn't felt like a huge issue because this feels like nothing compared to gluten-related anxiety.

However, I was smoking more than usual for a few months post-breakup and my body has a bit of recovery to do -- I've started having major flu-like symptoms which I know are nicotine withdrawal symptoms -- a sore throat, fatigue, achey & drainy feeling ears, etc. (I'm pretty sure I haven't been exposed to anything).

Does anyone have recommendations for dealing with these -- or know how long it takes to get through them? I'm trying to drink lots of water and, of course, I'm doing the usual supplementation things I always do -- but are there specific foods or supplements that might help this process along? Part of me just wants to get into bed with some chicken soup, but I don't know whether that's the best way to treat this or not.

I'm getting lots of exercise -- running daily and doing lots of yoga.

eleep

If some gluten free chicken soup helps along with a lazy day doing things only you want to do --then do it. You have overcome a major addiction and should do what you need to feel better. You are doing all the right things, drinking lots of water and excercise. Make sure your vitamins have high levels of the B's that will help with the stress. Most importantly reward yourself when you feel like it, you deserve it.

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