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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Going To The Allergy Doctor Monday A.m For More Skin Tests...
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My 2 year old had skin testing and blood work done several months ago and we discovered he is allergic to milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds. We are having additional testing done tomorrow for soy and wheat and the dr. said we will talk to find out what else I should have him tested for. I've noticed some problems with tomatoes and oranges, so I'm thinking of checking those and I heard corn is a big one for some people, right? Any recommendations on what I should be asking for? We suspect he's allergic to a lot of different things, but have not been able to pinpoint exactly what. I think we will be doing environmental ones as well since our other 2 kids have lots of environmental allergies.

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Just be aware that some of his problems could stem from intolerances, not allergies. Intolerances can be just as debilitating, but won't show up on allergy testing. Also, anything that causes delayed reactions won't show up, either.

That's why for soy and milk, enterolab testing is probably the best choice. I am only saying this, because if he shows 'not allergic' to those things, that doesn't necessarily mean he is fine with them. Wheat, gluten, milk, soy, corn................and the list goes on about the things that cause me to be awfully sick, all didn't show up on either allergy or intolerance testing for me (the nightshade family did, though). Because most of them give me a delayed reaction of at least a few hours, up to several days.

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My 2 year old had skin testing and blood work done several months ago and we discovered he is allergic to milk, eggs, peanuts, tree nuts, and seeds. We are having additional testing done tomorrow for soy and wheat and the dr. said we will talk to find out what else I should have him tested for. I've noticed some problems with tomatoes and oranges, so I'm thinking of checking those and I heard corn is a big one for some people, right? Any recommendations on what I should be asking for? We suspect he's allergic to a lot of different things, but have not been able to pinpoint exactly what. I think we will be doing environmental ones as well since our other 2 kids have lots of environmental allergies.

Corn has a habit of not showing up on tests and is only accurately diagnosed through diet. No harm in testing for it, but don't get shocked if it doesn't show up. If it does show up in any amount of reaction, pay close attention to it.

I'd have him tested for anything you think might be a problem. Grains, tomatoes, oranges, soy/legumes (btw he could also have problems with soy because its closely related to peanuts).

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Thanks Simply V and Ursula for all your ideas and suggestions!

I posted the update under another thread -- Dr. Thinks in might be eosinophilic esophagitis, not celiac.

I wish I could afford Enterolab. We hit our deductible and are taking advantage of everything though that is covered. :)

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