• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
0
MrsRibs

New To This - A Few Questions

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I was actually diagnosed with celiac disease in 1998 but after a misunderstanding between my PCP and myself (I hadn't realized that he had tested me, let alone that the results were very positive), and because I was pretty much symptom free, I did not take on the gluten-free diet at that point. Now, after losing my 23w old fetus and nearly my life to pneumoccal sepsis, my previous celiac disease diagnosis has come back to the forefront. I just started the diet 2 days ago and seem to be doing okay - my family eats a wholesome diet with much cooked from scratch so I am hoping with keeping an eye out, we wil manage.

I am worried about accidental exposures though through flavourings and coloring etc. For example, do I have to worry about any sodas? I am also wondering about food prep. The rest of my family are staying on a regular diet for now (we are in the process of having my 2 young children tested). Do I need to worry about touching pasta that may be cooked for them, or cereals that I serve them? What about my breadmaker? It has been previously used with wheat flour, do I have to trash it, or will a thorough cleaning do? It seems to me like a stupid question, but I just don't want to miss anything. I am sick and tired of being so utterly exhausted and really want this diet to work for me.

I also enjoy baking but was quite overwhelmed at the store yesterday trying to work out what gluten-free ingredients I needed to have in. There are so many different flours ... I would mainly be making cookies with my kids and probably some bread for me. What ingredients should I make sure I have in my cupboards?

Thank you so much

Heather

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Heather,

I have been on a gluten-free diet for 22 years but only recently realized the dangers of cross contamination. I have my own toaster now, my own pans for cooking. I have gotten rid of all the wooden spoons and plastic spoons and teflon pans which could have contamination.

As far a baking there was a mixture of rice flours on this site a couple of days ago I believe from Connie. You use equal parts asian flour (fine) glutenous flour, and a regular rice flour and substitute that mix for flour in your cookies etc. I did it yesterday for toll house chocolate chip cookies and I took them to a BD party for my niece and no one knew they were gluten-free until I told them. You can purchase the asian rice flour and the glutenous flour at an Asian Market and the cost is much more reasonable then at the health food stores.

You must be very careful using the same mayo, peanut butter etc, as your other family members may have used those products and contaminated them. I really didn't think this was possible until I was having problems and when they tested my blood it showed an elevation of gluten levels. Since I have been more careful they have dropped below 20.

I hope this helps a little, I am sure more people will give you suggestions to help you. Hang in there.

Kathy, NJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard about some "Bob's Red Mill" (or similar) flour...this way you don't need many different flours. One common baking ingredient is xanthan gum, but I would suggest using mixes at the beginning -- some of them can be really delicious and amazing.

Kathy made some good cross-contamination suggestions. Get new pots, pans, toaster oven, wooden spoons, collander, etc. You do need to be conscious of what you touch. If you're making a gluten-free and regular pasta at the same time, make sure that a utensil you use to stir the regular pasta doesn't touch the gluten-free one. Don't put anything in the microwave or on a countertop--use a plate. Don't double-dip anything (cream cheese, butter, pb, jelly....don't remember if this was mentioned). Finally, don't eat anything that you question. I don't cook gluten-free...well, don't cook beyond using mixes, so I can't really help, three. Good luck.

-celiac3270

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been gluten-free for a couple months now and I'm finally getting a handle on what I like/don't like. It takes a lot of experimenting. The best bread I've made so far is a variation of the four flour recipe in Gluten Free Gourmet by Bette Hagman. It has tapioca flour, corn starch, garfava flour (made with garbaonzo bean and fava bean) and I use glutenous rice flour rather than sorghum flour for the fourth flour. I also had to adjust a bit for elevation by using a little less water. But the bread tastes like high-quality white bread, good texture and taste. You can modify it by adding raisins and cinnamon, or by adding onion powder and sprinkling dehydrated onions on it, etc and so forth. Only by experimenting will you find what works for you.

As for the bread machine- I found that most gluten-free bread works better if you don't use the bread machine. Typically gluten-free bread works much better with just one rising rather than two, so I just use our bread machine to make wheat flour bread for the family and I make my own bread in a pan by hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,955
    • Total Posts
      943,664
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      67,261
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Floris
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I can't remember, but it was a few years ago and maybe it had Maltodextrin in it, or maybe it was the 'flavorings' - which I never eat unless it's from a company like Kraft or McCormick that labels clearly.  But given that you eat it safely, maybe I'll contact the company for a clear answer.    
    • So the simple explanation is - You eat gluten.  It travels along and gets to your small intestine.  For some reason, your small intestine feels it is an invader.  but instead of making antibodies that "attack" the gluten, the small intestine cells make antibodies that attack itself.  Sort of misguided, but that's what happens.  Now these antibodies are in the small intestines .  It can take weeks to make enough of them in the small intestine for them to make it to the blood stream in big enough numbers to show up on a Celiac blood test.  So, one meal of gluten, after a long period gluten-free, probably wouldn't effect the level of antibodies in the blood.  
    • Hi - I think some of the issue here may be stemming from confusion about the word "exposed" and the two things in bold above -- while you are very strict about eating gluten, am I right that you've been accidentally eating some and for the past month have accidentally been not-gluten-free?  If so, that likely is the cause of your cognitive problems, which I'm sure must be really difficult.  It sounds like you're on the right track with trying to make sure you get this accidental gluten ingestion eliminated from your environment.  Have you checked all your meds, hand moisturizers, etc. (I don't worry about most care products, but I do care about what goes on my hands)?  Dedicated toaster, cutting board, non-stick cooking utensils and pots? Also, is your thyroid ok?  As auto-immune disorders seem to run in packs, it's not unusual to have Hashimotos Hypothyroidism and Celiac together. As far as communicating the issue to others (your original question), I think it's fair to say to those who know you well that this is a side effect of an accidental glutening, and as for others, I think you can just let it go.  Chances are they don't see your struggles as intensely as you feel them. Bringing it to their attention may even make it more of an issue.  
    • my thinking was that if I ate gluten tonight again , then the reaction would be there tomorrow not that there would be gluten for them to find exactly. So from what your saying It would make sense - i.e. if my body was going to react to gluten with antibodies then by eating gluten say tonight it would mean they would be in my system tomorrow. Now of course they could be in my system anyway from the gluten I ate a few days ago , but it would be more of a sure thing if id eaten it the day before I would have thought.
    • Almond flour has a lot more fat in it than regular flours. It made out of nuts/almond which are fatty  
  • Upcoming Events