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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Is Wish Bone Italian Dressing Glutan Free?
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18 posts in this topic

Here are the ingredients listed on the back.

water

soybean oil

distilled vinegar

high fructose corn syrup

salt

garlic

onion

red bell peppers

xanthan gum

spices

natural flavors (soy)

calcium disodium edta (used to protect quality)

lemon juice concentrate

caramel color

annatto extract (for color)

dehydrates

What do you think? Yay or Nay?

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Angie,

Wish Bone is a Unilever company. They are a company that will clearly list any gluten on the label. Since there is none listed, it looks to be just fine.

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Well, I'd say no way just based on the caramel coloring, which can be made from a gluten source. They also don't say what the dehydrates are of/from. I'm basically suspicious of all such pre-made items.

The way I see it though, now that you know the basic ingredients, you could make your own so you'd know it's safe :)

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While it's possible for caramel coloring to be made from a gluten source, it would have to be listed on the label if that was the case. The vast majority of caramel coloring is not made from wheat, anyway--and again--if it were, it would, by law, have to listed as such. :)

Unilever is a company that is reliable in their listing of gluten, if present.

Of course, it's always possible for someone to react to any food or additive--but it wouldn't be from gluten in this case.

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RiceGuy,

Caramel coloring, while it can be wheat derived, is very rarely wheat derived.

Also, because of the 2006 FDA food labeling law, it would be REQUIRED to list it it were wheat.

Plus, as Patti mentioned, it is from a company that takes it a step further and will list all gluten.

Please be cautious of information that you share, especially to new people, who are overwhelmed and learning!

Electra-yes, it is safe, I use it often!

Laura

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Wooooooooohoooooooooooooo I'm so excited I bought some Glutan Free rice pasta to make my favorite pasta salad with and Wish Bone is my all time favorite Italian dressing, so I'm psyched. Now the cheese is another story. Here are the ingredients. Now the corn starch and anti caking ingredients are what I'm hesitant about.

Pasteurized Milk

Cheese Culture

Salt

Enzymes

Annato (Vegetable Color)

Potato Starch

Corn Starch

Calcium Sulfate (added to prevent caking)

Natamycin (A Natural Mold Inhibitor)

Yay or Nay?

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Safe :)

and Tinkyada brand rice pasta is by far the favorite of most people on this board!

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Safe :)

and Tinkyada brand rice pasta is by far the favorite of most people on this board!

Ok so the new law is that everything that has any kind of Gluten product in it needs to list it as "Wheat" in the label? I read the label to corn taco shells the other night and wasn't sure if the corn starch or anything like that were unsafe. There was no "Wheat" listed!!

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Ok so the new law is that everything that has any kind of Gluten product in it needs to list it as "Wheat" in the label? I read the label to corn taco shells the other night and wasn't sure if the corn starch or anything like that were unsafe. There was no "Wheat" listed!!

not listing wheat however, does not mean that it is gluten free. there are some companies that will list if it contains gluten clearly on the label but do not rely on something saying wheat free to be gluten free.

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With the new labeling laws in the US, any _wheat_ is required to be listed. HOWEVER, rye, barley, and oat are _not_ required by law to be listed :huh: . Unilever and Kraft WILL list rye, barley or oat, because they have chosen to give us the information we need (good manufacturer! :D ). Other manufacturers will not necessarily list these. so, if the "natural flavors" on another manufacturer include barley malt, they won't necessarily tell you, :ph34r: that's why it's a red flag ingredient. Because your salad dressing is from a celiac-friendly manufacturer, it's safe unless it specifically lists one of the no-no grains.

Don't want to confuse, but don't want you messing up because the nice manufacturors spoiled you!

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With the new labeling laws in the US, any _wheat_ is required to be listed. HOWEVER, rye, barley, and oat are _not_ required by law to be listed :huh: . Unilever and Kraft WILL list rye, barley or oat, because they have chosen to give us the information we need (good manufacturer! :D ). Other manufacturers will not necessarily list these. so, if the "natural flavors" on another manufacturer include barley malt, they won't necessarily tell you, :ph34r: that's why it's a red flag ingredient. Because your salad dressing is from a celiac-friendly manufacturer, it's safe unless it specifically lists one of the no-no grains.

Don't want to confuse, but don't want you messing up because the nice manufacturors spoiled you!

Aha see that's what I was afraid of. Is there a list of "safe" manufacturers who we can trust to list the wheats and glutens as such? If so can someone direct me to it please ;-)!!

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Does anyone know of a company that makes Gluten Free crackers like goldfish? My daughter absolutely LOVES those and I'm HATING the fact that I have to NEVER let her have them again!!

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Miss Roben's makes a mix that you then bake yourself.

Corn starch is safe. Please look at the lists on celiac.com so that you can learn about some of the safe ingredients.All companies will list wheat.

Kraft and Unilever are two companies that always list any gluten source. McCormick is also good about it. There are more, though.

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OK folks. I acknowledge that Unilever says they will list when something contains wheat. I guess what bothers me is when a package doesn't clearly state gluten-free on the label. I mean, sure THEY may not have added wheat/gluten, but suppose one of the ingredients they use already contains gluten? Maybe I'm a bit too careful. Maybe I go overboard about it, but the phrase "better safe than sorry" comes to mind whenever I have even the slightest doubt.

Some companies provide a list of their gluten-free products, but unfortunately Wish Bone currently doesn't have one that I can find. Perhaps a letter to them would prompt them to put something on their site.

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Most labels of mainstream products that are gluten free do not say they are gluten free. There are no guidelines for saying something is gluten free. Labeling laws are there for a reason, and it doesn't matter how the wheat is there, if it is there it has to be listed! In time, I'm sure that more companies will begin to do that as Celiac awareness raises, but at this time, I don't think its a problem if:

1. All companies are required to list wheat, which is the most common source of gluten

2. Certain companies go as far as to make sure that any gluten source is clearly listed, so that we can make informed decisions.

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I looked on Wishbone's website b/c I had the same question and it states:

"Common ingredients that may contain gluten are rye, wheat, oats and barley, and noodles and pasta prepared with any of the previously mentioned grains. HVP, TVP, flavorings, are likely to contribute gluten as well, however, if they contain any gluten, the source would always be listed in the ingredient statements.

Since product formulations change from time to time, we do not have a printed list of products that identifies those products that contain specific allergens or gluten. The best advice we can give you is to check the ingredient list on the label. Ingredient allergens as defined by FDA: peanuts, tree nuts, soy, fish, seafood, wheat, eggs, and milk or dairy, as well as any ingredient that may contain gluten are always listed on the label. If gluten is present, it is clearly listed in plain language on the ingredient label (i.e., wheat flour, rye, barley, oats, and malt). Malt is a barley based ingredient.

We do not publish a list of gluten-free flavors. Therefore, we suggest reading all ingredient labels carefully. As always, if you cannot determine whether the product contains the ingredient in question, we recommend that you don't use it."

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This topic is more than five years old, but what was stated back then is still true: It is a Unilever brand, and Unilever will always clearly disclose any gluten.

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Like Peter said it's an old topic. Wish Bone now labels their dressings gluten-free.

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