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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Wendy's French Fries?
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I also was hoping someone could tell me if burger king or other restaurants have gluten in their fries.

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McDonalds fries are safe. However, there is some debate around this topic. If you are in Canada, New York Fries are safe too.

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I believe the issue with Wendy's fries are that they are fried in the same vat as the chicken nuggets & fried chicken sandwhich breasts. Wendy's has a gluten-free area on their website at http://www.wendys.com

Editing to add that Chik-fil-a waffle fries are gluten-free and YUMMY!!

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I believe the issue with Wendy's fries are that they are fried in the same vat as the chicken nuggets & fried chicken sandwhich breasts. Wendy's has a gluten-free area on their website at http://www.wendys.com

Editing to add that Chik-fil-a waffle fries are gluten-free and YUMMY!!

Thanks!

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Check the websites of all the big chains and they list information on there (BK, ChickFILA, McDs, Wendys).

However, there is always a risk of cross contamination, esp with the oil (using it to fry other things). Some places say they never fry anything else, but people have reacted. So, if you get sick, its not your imagination :)

Good luck.

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I just noticed your signature: allergy to wheat/oats, milk, eggs, corn, yeast, tree nuts, turkey, fish, seeds, mold, dust, dander, pollens, soy and other legumes

Son: allergy to milk, corn, beans/legumes

if you can't have legumes....isn't peanut a legume? Some places use peanut oil.

if you are allergic to corn, you will need to know if their salt is iodized, bc many salts (including regular table salt at home, Morton's) has corn derivatives in it.

(I'm not sure if you were asking for you or for someone else, but I wanted to add that)

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My Wendy's has a dedicated frier. But my Burger King is a definite no. They fry they're frys in the same oil as everything else thats breaded.

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I just noticed your signature: allergy to wheat/oats, milk, eggs, corn, yeast, tree nuts, turkey, fish, seeds, mold, dust, dander, pollens, soy and other legumes

Son: allergy to milk, corn, beans/legumes

if you can't have legumes....isn't peanut a legume? Some places use peanut oil.

if you are allergic to corn, you will need to know if their salt is iodized, bc many salts (including regular table salt at home, Morton's) has corn derivatives in it.

(I'm not sure if you were asking for you or for someone else, but I wanted to add that)

I react to some legumes, but not all. So far not peanuts, but I develope new allergies all the time. So I try not to eat them too often. I haven't eaten anything at any restaurant in a long time. I am just curious because I thought I might try it, but I'm in no hurry to use my epipen either.

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Shai-

I don't blame you about the epipen! I was having health issues this summer and fall and I was reacting to all but 8 foods...it was a nightmare. I can symphathize with you on that. Corn to me was the kicker....I had no idea it was in everything. It makes gluten look like a cakewalk!!!!!! There is a neat corn free cookbook that Living Without Magazine offers, but I'm not so sure how helpful it will be when you have multiple allergies (I ordered it right before I realized I was reacting to most everything, so I never really used it much).

Good luck :) :) :)

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Julie,

There have been many, many threads about McDonald's fries. Here is an article about it. http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodi...-01106423369.76

I also suggest doing a search on this board and reading some of the discussions ... here is one of them: http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?s...mp;hl=mcdonalds

The GIG has independently tested them and they are safe in terms of being gluten free.

Take care,

Laura

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Wendy's fried aren't on their gluten-free list simply because not all locations have dedicated fryers. If the location you visit has a dedicated fryer, they're gluten-free. But fast food places are inherently risky.

richard

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My son has eaten Wendy's fries quite a few times without any issues...watch, I probably jinxed myself! :P If you call, ask to speak to a manager and be *very* specific about what you mean by a dedicated frier.

I have to say that the Wendy's by me has been incredibly helpful and mindful of the need for gluten-free. When I order my son's plain burger and fries, I immediately tell them he has an allergy (it's just easier) and absolutely must have a fresh burger that did not touch the bun. They've actually waited until I've come to the window to pay before they even pack his food to confirm that they've "got it right."

I don't do Mc Donald fries....way too much controversy and way too big of a risk. Just MHO. Wendy's is just as convenient for me to buy as a treat.

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