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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

The Most Delicious Home-made Gluten Free Bread I've Ever Tasted...
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341 posts in this topic

Mine didn't rise fast at all. In fact, today I used the full 80 minutes AND I used quick rise yeast. :huh:

I wonder if it's because my pan is a different shape. It has the same volume (roughly) as a 9x5 pan, but it's 11x4.

I warmed the milk first, as a previous poster had...I may have murdered the yeast. :ph34r:

Make sure you don't use the instant yeast - if mine didn't rise at all, I'd probably go and get some fresh new yeast. As for warming the milk and ingredients, I've made this several times now and it's really not necessary to warm up the milk or eggs. If you can, just put them into a cup or bowl ahead of time and let them warm to room temperature.

I think that pan size should be fine IMO.

Perhaps Laurie can help you out further.

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Hi All,

I'm new here....been perusing the board for a few weeks and decided to jump on in. I'd like to try this recipe as the various gluten-free breads I've purchased at the store have been less than satisifying. I looked in the fridge and see that I only have two eggs....would sour cream work as a replacement for the two egg whites? If not, what else would work to replace the egg whites? I'm in the mood to bake today so any help would be appreciated. Thanks! Deb

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I've tried a couple of mixes from the store, and my husband didn't really like them (him - gluten intolerance, me trying to be supportive). I wanted to try this recipe since everyone is raving about it, but I think I messed up!

Mine was not "pourable" into the bread pan - it was very thick. I double checked and I put the right amount of ingrediants, and I used the gluten-free mix by Hagman for the gluten-free flour. Its attempting to rise right now, but I've never had very good luck with bread, so we'll see what happens.

I think next time I'm going to try the sorghum flour instead of the garflava - I am not so sure about this bean taste.. maybe it bakes out a bit?

Any thoughts or advice would be appreciated! Also, we don't have a bread machine, and I want to hold off purchasing one until we know if I will be baking bread or just buying the occasional loaf from the health food store... But should I get a heavy duty mixer? I only have a hand one, and it is not capable of mixing this batter/dough...

Thanks! Beth

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Mine didn't pour either. I have a heavy duty mixer. It seems to mix well with that, but I could see a hand mixer being a problem for sure. I hope it works out for you.

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Mine didn't pour either. I have a heavy duty mixer. It seems to mix well with that, but I could see a hand mixer being a problem for sure. I hope it works out for you.

Thanks! :) The good news is its been about 30 minutes, and it is clearly rising, something my other baking attempts failed to do... I'll keep my fingers crossed!

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First of all I must say, "Lorka" is a godess amongst celiacs!!! This bread is awesome! I have made it 3 times in the last week because it goes so fast as the novelty of having bread again has not worn off. The last time I made it I made it into rolls that came out really well. One tip for making a good shaped consistant sized roll is to use a ice cream scoop (the kind with the spring release works best). I put them on sprayed/greased cookie sheets and let them rise for about 50-60 minutes and then baked them at 350F for about 20-25 minutes. The kids went to school with the most beautiful looking sandwiches ever!

For those of you that count carbs - I figured (by fairly rough calculation) that when using the recipe as written (with the flour mix being white rice, sorghum and tapioca) the carbs for the loaf are 371 grams for 12 slices that's 31 grams per slice. When I made the rolls the recipe yeilded 13 rolls, so about 29 grams of carb per roll.

Thanks again for this recipe, you've made a 6 year old and her mom VERY happy!

Barb

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well, geez, if i just hand out my recipes, who is going to buy my cookbook?????????????!

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I think this is what they call a "teaser" now we're all hooked and I for one would buy any cook book of yours. Thanks again!

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well, geez, if i just hand out my recipes, who is going to buy my cookbook?????????????!

Given that I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to baking bread, the fact that I've had several flops with different recipes, and that my loaf is 5 minutes from being done, and looks fabulous, I'd say...

ME!!! :)

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Count me in too. :)

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I've But should I get a heavy duty mixer? I only have a hand one, and it is not capable of mixing this batter/dough...

I burned the motor out using my little light-weight hand mixer (probably 20 years old, so it's no great loss). Anticipating making another loaf today, I went out yesterday and bought a KitchenAid "Ultra Power" hand mixer. It has regular beaters and dough beaters. It worked like a charm and had no problem mixing up this heavy dough.

I also bought another loaf pan (the one I had been using is 8-1/2 x 4-1/5). So I bought a "professional" 9"x5" pan.

The loaf rose up well and I put the flat pan over the top as suggested and that did help square off the top surface. When I put it in the oven, the dough was about 1/4 inch over the top in the center. It rose up another 2 inches, and STILL FELL after I took it out of the oven.

WHAT AM I DOING WRONG??? Should I let it sit in the pan for a while before taking it out???

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Make sure you don't use the instant yeast - if mine didn't rise at all, I'd probably go and get some fresh new yeast. As for warming the milk and ingredients, I've made this several times now and it's really not necessary to warm up the milk or eggs. If you can, just put them into a cup or bowl ahead of time and let them warm to room temperature.

I think that pan size should be fine IMO.

Perhaps Laurie can help you out further.

I checked the yeast and in tiny print it said instant. It did say quick or fast acting in big print. Next time I'll use regular and see what happens. Ty's been eating it anyway, so it must be all right.

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Yes, I definitely just use 'regular' yeast.

Regarding the cookbook - I've love to scratch a few of your brains with my ideas, and get some feedback. If you feel like helping me out (and by all means, you don't have to), it would be grand!

In that case, please email me!

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I checked the yeast and in tiny print it said instant. It did say quick or fast acting in big print. Next time I'll use regular and see what happens. Ty's been eating it anyway, so it must be all right.

Well, from the picture of your loaf, it turned out perfect!

Unless someone has a suggestion for me, I think the next loaf I'll reduce the water slightly and let it rise only about 1/4 inche from the top, rather than all the way. (It is perhaps just a tad too moist.)

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The first two batches I used turned out great...I used a hand mixer.

The next two batches didn't turn out at all. They rose fine but fell. I used the bosch mixer.

I do have the quick rise I think though (not sure). I got it bulk.

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Yes, I definitely just use 'regular' yeast.

Regarding the cookbook - I've love to scratch a few of your brains with my ideas, and get some feedback. If you feel like helping me out (and by all means, you don't have to), it would be grand!

In that case, please email me!

I'd appreciate an ethnic gluten-free cookbook. But a really comprehensive one, not basic. Something that would go in depth and cover ALL cuisines, not just scratch the surface like the mainstream ethnic cookbooks do. Also, something that has good substitutions for those who can't have certain ingredients aside from gluten.

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The loaf rose up well and I put the flat pan over the top as suggested and that did help square off the top surface. When I put it in the oven, the dough was about 1/4 inch over the top in the center. It rose up another 2 inches, and STILL FELL after I took it out of the oven.

WHAT AM I DOING WRONG??? Should I let it sit in the pan for a while before taking it out???

Mine fell a little bit, and caved in on the sides a little bit, so next time I'm going to let it sit in the pan for a few minutes (I took it out right away)..... But ABSOLUTELY Delicious - and pretty easy to make! My hubby loved it too, and since he's the one who has to eat it, that was the point.... My mom was even interested in the recipe, just because she liked it....

So I volunteer to be a tester! Consider me the inexperienced guinea pig - to see if the recipes are user friendly for the inexperienced baker! :)

Beth

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I'm glad I'm not the only one with the problem. And I am an experienced bread baker.... from years ago, though :(

A couple things that DID go right..... :)

I found that if I measured the oil first, then used the same tablespoon to measure the honey, the honey just slid right off the spoon.

I used my electric knife to cut this last loaf and it worked very well. Didn't gum up the blades one bit.

Now that I'm going to be baking this bread every week, I'm going to mix up a large batch of the dry ingredients (minus the flax and yeast) so I don't have to drag everything out each time.

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OK, I'm going to be trying this recipe soon! I have a bread recipe that my dd likes well and I have figured out how to get to turn out pretty well, but with all the raving, I'm going to try it. We have never done flax before, but I bought some the other day for this recipe.

Here's my advice about the baking/falling. I've had that happen too. I now preheat the oven to 200 when I'm mixing the bread. Put the bread pan in the oven and turn the oven OFF. I set the timer for 20 minutes and when the bread is just below the rim of the pan, I turn the ofen back on to 400 and let bake for another 15-20 minutes. If it rises above the rim, then I have the sinking/falling problem.

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I found that if I measured the oil first, then used the same tablespoon to measure the honey, the honey just slid right off the spoon.

That is so funny! I had that revelation too! I was amazed at how easy the honey came out, and even wrote a little note to myself to do that again! eheheheh

Its the little things that thrill....

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I've been baking for a few years now. One daughter needs to be gluten and corn free, thus I have to make the bread because most mixes use corn starch. When the baked goods collapse, it is usually due to too much liquid in the mix. If you're having that problem, try cutting out up to 1/4 cup of liquid. Most of the time the consistency of my bread dough is like a thick cake batter. I use a heavy duty mixer, too.

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I made a loaf of this bread last night, too.

I used garbanzo bean flour instead of the farvara bean flour.

I did, though, have the problem of the bread getting three times bigger as it baked and then falling as it cooled off. I read all the advice and I want to try another load tomorrow. I never thought I would ever be able to eat the fluffy bread again.

I love the fact that the reciepe calls for healthy flours. It's just what I've been looking for.

I LOVE THIS WEB SITE.

Thanks to all.

Juanita

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II want to try another load tomorrow. .

Let us know what you did and how it turned out. One loaf lasts my husband at least a week, so I won't need to bake another loaf until next week. I'm so hoping I canl make a "perfect" loaf (Not that the "fallen" loaf doesn't taste just as good.)

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I just pulled a loaf out of the oven (my 3rd) and it got so big I think it was going to burst right out of the oven! It is now falling before my eyes. This is the first time that I made it with water instead of milk and the first time that I am having the high rise/flop problem. Anyone else notice this difference between milk vs. water or do you think it is a coincidence?

I also let it rise for 40 min. in a preheated (turned off) oven then turned the temp up to 350 before the loaf reached the top of the pan and baked for a little less than 40 min. I am cooling in the pan to see if that contains it.

When I made the recipe into rolls it worked great but even in the much smaller size the bottoms of some of the rolls were kind of dimpled in the center. Next time I may cut out a bit of liquid....

Still loving the great taste and texture though!!

B.

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