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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Celiac Disease, Gluten Ataxia And Candida
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42 posts in this topic

I never got completely better after eliminating gluten. Unfortunately, alot of us are in the same boat with regards to ongoing symptoms, leaky gut, increased food intolerances and so on. It seems obvious to me that there are underlying issues involved when we do not recover following a strict gluten free diet.

If symptoms persist after removal of gluten, dairy, soy, egg, etc....and the list of "safe" foods gets shorter and shorter....in my mind there *must* be some other mechanism (or organism) involved in this process and continued decline in health.

I've mostly been looking into "triggers" of Celiac as possibly also being the cause for ongoing symptoms and failure to fully recover as swiftly as many others do on a gluten-free diet.

I focused on food eliminations for a very long time and I dont find other foods to be the *cause*....at least not in my case. I find that food intolerances are simply a result of a persistant leaky gut and while they *do* provoke a wide array of symptoms....they are also a symptom in an of themselves.

So w/out the presence of gluten in the diet....what is keeping the gut from properly healing as it does for so many others? I know that many will say soy or dairy can cause the same type of damage but I dont find alot of science backing this theory up. <_<

Personally, I dont think its the answer. I think that we can react very strongly to these proteins due to leaky gut and therefore people with leaky gut shouldnt consume foods that are foods very likely to cause an immune response. This also goes for food dyes, preservatives, msg, aspartame, additives and a whole laundry list of stuff found in processed foods.

With leaky gut....everything that we encounter...whether its toxins produced within our body, or toxins in our foods..or environmental toxins...the potential for these things passing through the gut and into the bloodstream is high. We should avoid as many of these things as possible in order to heal...this means eating a very "clean" diet.

Its not a coincidence that many of us feel better following this type of diet. Its not a coincidence that eating processed foods make us feel worse....whether they're gluten-free or not. But *WHY* do we still suffer from leaky gut after eliminating gluten....and *WHY* are the symptoms hitting some of us even *harder* after eliminating gluten??

If I was to take a poll the most common problematic foods (gluten aside) that will turn up are these..

Dairy

Rice

Corn

Fruits

Beans

Peanuts

Soy

Processed foods

Starches

Sugars

These are also the foods that will feed any yeast or "bad" bugs that may have overgrown while our immune systems were weak.

I looked into Lyme as a possible trigger for Celiac and a reason for ongoing symptoms follwing a gluten-free diet.

Even though many Lyme patients do have gluten intolerance, leaky gut and food intolerance....I dont believe the Lyme is *directly* responsible for these particular symptoms....other than the fact that the infection is weakening the immune system.

I believe the common link may be Candida Albicans. A great deal of Lyme patients suffer from candida overgrowth....as do a great deal of Celiacs. In fact candida overgrowth is found to be an issue in almost all chronic illness....mainly because its opportunistic and takes advantage when our immune system is under stress. It can really take off when antibiotics are taken while immune defenses are down. Unfortuately, we take antibiotics when we are sick....from infections....so the chances for an overgrowth of yeast are high.

I have severe leaky gut, multiple food intolerance, chemical and environmental sensitivities and these symtpoms have persisted for 4 years now. Yes, I was aware of Candida as being a problem and I attempted to treat it myself for a period of time....through diet and antifungal treatment. It was during this time that I felt the best. However, I did not know whether this was due to candida treatment or removal of gluten from my diet....or both.

My symptoms did return when introducing all of the foods listed above.....which happened to be the same foods that feed candida and were restricted while on my candida diet.

I understand that candida occurs when the immune system is weak I focused my attention on finding out why I have candida to begin with. It may be Lyme Disease....I'm not 100% sure....all I know is that I've got problems and I'm not able to recover on my own.

One of my Dr.'s thought Candida might be severe in my case and I had a bloodtest for antibodies associated to things that are leading causes of leaky gut.....dietary protein, yeast, and bacteria. I had slightly elevated results for certain bacteria and dietary protein. I had significantly high antibodies toward yeast. The person who had ordered the test had only seen one person with higher results. My primary Dr. found the results to be very significant as well...yeast is clearly an issue as my antibody levels were 5-6 times the normal level.

I started researching Candida again and found some very interesting research that may be the answer I've been looking for all this time....I dont know because it appears that this research is fairly recent. I believe it could very important with regards to ongoing symptoms in Celiacs or those who are non-celiac gluten intolerant.

I've been posting about this on the OMG thread but thought I'd share it here.....in case others may benefit from it...and also to get some feedback.

So it seems that Candida Albicans and gluten share the exact same amino acid sequence. This is the same sequence which triggers the autoimmune response when gluten is present. Sooo....if this is true....it means that even if we are 100% gluten-free....our immune systems can still react to a candida overgrowth in the same way that it reacts to gluten. In effect it can cause the same damage and produce the same symptoms.

Candida, as many of us know, adheres itself to the intestinal wall...causing leaky gut. It seems very plausible that if we suffer from an overgrowth of this pathogenic yeast....our guts will not be allowed to heal...gluten-free or not.

Here is the info that I found in my research...

Coeliac disease is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the small intestine that is induced by ingestion of gluten proteins from wheat, barley, or rye. We postulate that Candida albicans is a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease. The virulence factor of C albicans-hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1)-contains aminoacid sequences that are identical or highly homologous to known coeliac disease-related alpha-gliadin and gamma-gliadin T-cell epitopes. HWP1 is a transglutaminase substrate, and is used by C albicans to adhere to the intestinal epithelium. Furthermore, tissue transglutaminase and endomysium components could become covalently linked to the yeast. Subsequently, C albicans might function as an adjuvant that stimulates antibody formation against HWP1 and gluten, and formation of autoreactive antibodies against tissue transglutaminase and endomysium.
Celiac Disease, Gluten Ataxia and Candidiasis

Celiac disease, triggered by gluten proteins from wheat in susceptible people, can damage the central nervous system. The cell walls of Candida, the yeast responsible for oral thrush, vaginal infections and intestinal Candidiasis, contain the same protein sequence as wheat gluten and may trigger or stimulate Celiac Disease.

Our understanding of celiac disease has come a long way in the last few years. Several recent studies have linked celiac disease to central nervous system damage which may cause sporadic ataxia. Other studies have identified the particular protein sequence in gluten which causes celiac disease. Other researchers have identified a similar protein in candida yeast and suggest that it may also trigger the same disease. These studies suggest that the typical digestive symptoms we associate with celiac disease are present less than 20% of the time. Having "normal" digestion no longer rules out the disease.

This is a complicated business but I think rather than gloss over it many people deserve and need the details. So please bear with me and skip over the parts that get to thick.

First a bit of background:

Celiac disease is also called coeliac disease or celiac sprue. The Merck Manual defines it as a "chronic intestinal malabsorption disorder caused by intolerance to gluten." [1] The villi of the small intestine atrophy and nutrients are poorly absorbed resulting in steatorrhea (frequent greasy stools) and malnutrition. Sufferers usually get better when gluten containing cereal grains are removed from the diet. Although the syndrome was described earlier, [2] it wasn't until 1950 that the link between dietary cereals and the disease was figured out. [3] During the Second World War when the Germans occupied Holland , children with celiac sprue improved dramatically only to get sick again disease again at the end of the war. During the war, wheat and rye were in short supply in Holland . The researcher who noticed this was able to show that it was the gluten protein in grains which triggered the disease. [4]

Celiac is a genetic disorder and the incidence varies among different populations. Ireland and people of Irish descent have the highest incidence, about 1 person in 300. In Europe and the United States the incidence is much lower, reported at about 1 in 2,500 or less. The longer a population has eaten wheat the lower the incidence. Europeans have cultivated wheat for almost 9,000 years while the Irish have grown it for only about 3,000 years. I suppose we could rename the disease Celtic Sprue rather than celiac sprue. When tested 90% of people with celiac disease are positive for the HLA-B8 antigen in their blood.

The classic problems associated with celiac disease are those of malabsorption and nutritional deficiency. Children with the disease fail to thrive; they are deficient in all of the fat soluble vitamins (A, E, K, and D) and many of the minerals, especially calcium and magnesium. While children are prone to osteomalacia, adults usually develop osteoporosis. This has been the description of celiac disease that medical text books have talked about for decades. Now for what's new.

For the last ten years we have known that celiac disease is associated with hypothyroid disease, specifically Hashimoto's Disease. About 10- 14% of celiac patients are hypothyroid. Celiac patients are about ten times as likely to have thyroid nodules. [5,6,7] Is it the same genetic predisposition making people overly prone to develop autoimmune diseases that causes both conditions? Or is it the chronic bowel inflammation that stimulates these autoimmune reactions? At this point it isn't clear.

Celiac is clearly an autoimmune disease. The gliaden portion of the gluten protein contains a sequence of amino acids that trigger the immune reaction. When they bind on to the intestinal mucosa they act as an antigen and summon killer lymphocytes to attack. The immune system also develops an immune reaction to the muscle lining of the intestine, the endomysium and the enzyme transglutaminase. [8] People with celiac disease make antibodies which attack both the endomysium and the enzyme transglutaminase. Once this autoimmune process has been triggered, damage occurs in other parts of the body and not just the intestine.

Neurological damage occurs with celiac disease. Early on this was thought to be due to nutrient deficiencies caused by malabsorption. Current research shows that the problem is more complex. Celiac disease stimulates the production of antibodies which attack areas besides the intestine including the central nervous system. About 40% of patients who suffer from idiopathic sporadic ataxia have celiac disease which damages their central nervous systems. [9,10,11] The neurological symptoms of celiac disease mimic the symptoms of multiple sclerosis to the degree that celiac must always be ruled out when diagnosing this disease. [12] The neurological conditions caused by celiac disease are now called gluten ataxia and cause damage to the cerebellum, the posterior columns of the spinal cord, and the peripheral nerves. [13]

The studies on gluten ataxia have revealed a significant statistic. In patients who had clearly measurable antibodies that are diagnostic of celiac disease and were suffering from gluten ataxia, only 13% had any gastrointestinal complaints. In other words, the hallmark symptoms of poor digestion we associate with celiac disease and use to diagnose the condition may be absent in 87% of patients with gluten related problems! [14] This suggests that celiac may be way under diagnosed.

Now we come to what to me is the most interesting of the recent research regarding celiac. It seems fitting that the research again comes from Holland , where celiac disease was first linked to diet. Dr. Nieuwenhuizen, from the research group TNO Nutrition and Food Research, published a paper in the June, 2003, Lancet. He links celiac disease with Candida albicans. Dr. Nieuwenhuizen, knowing the actual sequence of proteins which trigger celiac disease from the published work of other scientists, had searched the databases available to him through TNO to see if the same sequence existed in other places. It turns out the identical sequence of proteins occur in the cell walls of Candida albicans. [15]

These Candida gluten-like proteins turn out to be the yeast's "hypha-specific surface protein" nicknamed Hwp1. This is the yeast's version of Velcro and allows it to attach and hang onto the endomysium in the wall of the intestine. It is also targeted by transglutaminase, the enzyme which acts on the gluten protein and serves as a target for immune antibodies. Candida species which don't have this Hwp1 protein can't attach themselves to the digestive tract. [16]

If Candida can trigger the same chemical and immunological reactions as wheat gluten do we can imagine a number of interesting implications.

First, in people with celiac disease, symptoms usually get better rapidly when they eliminate gluten from their diet. This isn't always the case. Even without gluten some people continue to have symptoms. They may have intestinal Candidiasis. The Candida in their gut may be acting like gluten and continues triggering symptoms.

Second, an acute Candida infection may trigger the onset of celiac disease. Even if the Candida is treated and eliminated, the person could be left with a permanent sensitivity to wheat gluten. Candida infections occur frequently with antibiotic usage. In people genetically susceptible to celiac, extra caution should be exercised when using antibiotics to prevent Candida overgrowth.

Third, if wheat can cause neurological damage as in gluten ataxia, it is reasonable to assume that Candida could also do so by the same process. Reports of Candida infections causing neurological symptoms are not uncommon; now we have a possible explanation.

Fourth, if only a small portion of the people with gluten ataxia have gastrointestinal symptoms despite their severe damage elsewhere in their bodies, it is reasonable to assume that Candida could stimulate significant problems while producing slight or no digestive symptoms.

So what does all this mean? Here's the bottom line:

Celiac disease may be grossly under diagnosed. It should be ruled out in any chronic digestive condition even if the symptoms don't fit the classic picture. Celiac disease should also be ruled out in osteoporosis and in neurological problems, especially MS. Celiac disease should also be ruled out in Hashimoto's Disease and other thyroid abnormalities. Whenever Celiac disease is diagnosed, Candida infections should be tested for and treated aggressively. People of Irish descent are far more likely to get celiac disease than others and should be extra cautious to avoid Candida infections and treat them aggressively if they occur.

So at my last Dr. appt. when my Dr. was adressing my high yeast antibodies and discussing treatment he also mentioned avoing wheat, dairy and sugar...as these are very problematic foods for people dealing with Candida.

I then mentioned to him that I'm on a gluten-free diet due to positive test results showing elevated tissue transglutinamase and elevated IgA (Enterolab)....although I do not have the markers for Celiac Disease...

He then said to me...

"You know....there are some researchers who now believe that candida and gluten can trigger the same immune response because the sequence that triggers the attack is identical in both gluten and candida."

Sooo...this does not seem far fetched to me at all. It seems quite clear that the amino acid sequence in candida is identical to that found in gluten. It seems perfectly logical that if candida is present and adhering itself to the intestinal wall....the immune system will then launch the same attack it would in the presence of gluten.

Maybe this is a plausible reason for positive tTG seen in so many Enterolab results...when there are no genetic markers for Celiac??? This could answer ALOT of questions.....there are endless possibilities if this information has merit.

Any thoughts???

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Thanks for a very informative post, Rachel. I gave up a long time ago on the OMG thread. I know you've been doing a lot of research and we are the happy recipients of your work.

I believe the common link may be Candida Albicans. A great deal of Lyme patients suffer from candida overgrowth....as do a great deal of Celiacs. In fact candida overgrowth is found to be an issue in almost all chronic illness....mainly because its opportunistic and takes advantage when our immune system is under stress. It can really take off when antibiotics are taken while immune defenses are down. Unfortuately, we take antibiotics when we are sick....from infections....so the chances for an overgrowth of yeast are high.

I don't have much to comment or add to your post, but one thing stood out to me - the fact that Americans are far too dependent on antibiotics and doctors are far too willing to pass them out for almost anything. I'm sure that this is a contributing factor in the high incidence of celiac/gluten-intolerance, not to mention the Candida problems that so many people suffer from. From an early age we destroy the balance in the intestinal tract and then suffer the long-term consequences.

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Rachel, can you post a link for the study? Thanks. :)

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Question - per your research and what your dr. said, does that mean that candida will do the same damage to your intestines as gluten for a celiac (i.e., all "yeasty" foods)? If so, then how long do you have to be on the candida diet? Or is that something you have to do for life like the gluten-free diet? I"m just curious b/c I"ve been gluten-free for 8 months and have noticed some improvement, but am still having some intestinal issues (not as bad though - they come and go and could be accidental glutenings).

Another question - what in the heck do you eat on the candida/gluten-free diet?!!!!!

:blink:

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Rachel,

Thanks for posting this research. It makes a lot of sense to me. When I first got sick, about 10-1/2 years ago, my naturopath did a test for candida and other fungi first thing. I was on some potent anti-fungals for several months. I had kind of forgotten about that. Now, I'm fine as long as I keep my diet restricted. It's definitely something you want to take care of. My doctor now wants me to take a special kind of potent friendly bacteria once or twice a year - she calls it "fertilizer".

It sure would be nice if this could all be easy!

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Rachel, can you post a link for the study? Thanks. :)

Yeah... :)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...t_uids=12826451

This is where I found what I quoted in my first post

http://www.life-enthusiast.com/index/Conce.../Celiac_Disease

I didnt see this earlier but the same info is actually on this site...

http://www.celiac.com/st_prod.html?p_prodid=859

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Thanks for a very informative post, Rachel. I gave up a long time ago on the OMG thread. I know you've been doing a lot of research and we are the happy recipients of your work.

Thanks, I know that thread isnt easy to keep up with. I thought this research was particularly interesting and might apply to alot of people who continue to have symptoms....which is why I posted it seperate from the OMG thread. :)

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Question - per your research and what your dr. said, does that mean that candida will do the same damage to your intestines as gluten for a celiac (i.e., all "yeasty" foods)?

Yes....what the researchers are saying is that candida can cause the same immune response in a person with Celiac as gluten does.

The "yeasty" foods arent actually going to cause damage....they will feed the yeast. If you have an overgrowth and continue to eat foods that feed the yeast....its alot like throwing fuel onto an already burning fire. The yeast produce toxins...so this creates alot of symptoms that are just caused by having an overgrowth.

If so, then how long do you have to be on the candida diet? Or is that something you have to do for life like the gluten-free diet? :blink:
You would need to get the candida under control...diet alone usually wont get rid of it.

I have to take anti-fungals as well as watch my diet.

No...you dont have to stay on a candida diet for life. If you can get the situation under control and get your gut back in a healthy balance....with good bacteria...then the candida problem should subside.

You would also need to determine what caused the overgrowth to begin with?? If you have something going on that is taking a toll on your immune system....it wont be easy to get yourself back into balance.....and no matter what you do the candida may persist.

It can be any number of things that triggered the overgrowth. Antibiotics, stress, heavy metal toxicity, Lyme Disease, Celiac/gluten intolerance, steroids, birth control pills, prescription meds such as NSAIDS, bacteria such as H.Pylori, parasites such as Giardia, etc....basically anything that is weaking the immune system.

So if the initial cause for your overgrowth hasnt been addressed and your immune system is still suppressed due to one or more of the above factors....then you'll continue to have candida issues.

Oh...a diet that is high in refined sugars, processed foods, and junk is a big factor as well. Its a factor in the development of an overgrowth and its a factor in not being able to get rid of the overgrowth.

Another question - what in the heck do you eat on the candida/gluten-free diet?!!!!!

There are about a gazzillion websites on the candida diet....also quite a few books.

Here is one site...

http://nourished.com.au/articles/how-to-ov...-candida-part-1

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That information is very interesting. This research could answer a lot of questions. You've been doing a lot of research Rachel!

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Bless your heart Rachel.

This is just the info I've been 'lurking' and searching out on the OMG.

I told the people on Daily Strength to come over and take a look at this thread.

I'm still unclear as to what 'test' shows the Candida or yeast overgrowth?

will this last link show me..? haven't ck'd yet as i wanted to thank you before..'brain fog' hit.

I was 'soy-ed' 2 nites ago and just late in the day started to feel like I was going to live.

BLASTED SOY :ph34r:

Have a great Sudan. What movie were you going to see?

Judy

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I'm still unclear as to what 'test' shows the Candida or yeast overgrowth?

will this last link show me..? haven't ck'd yet as i wanted to thank you before..'brain fog' hit.

Judy,

There are various tests out there for candida overgrowth...many labs offer these tests. The problem is reliability. I dont think candida is the easiest thing to determine through testing....and especially with regards to severity of the overgrowth.

I can tell you from my own experience that I dont think stool tests are completely reliable.

I originally diagnosed myself with Candida (based on symptoms). I read books and followed the diet...got my Dr. to prescribe anti-fungals...etc.

After about 4 months I decided to get a stool test to see what was really going on. This was the same time I started reading this site and learning about Celiac. Since I was already on the Candida diet I was already gluten-free....so I decided to do Enterolab testing too.

My stool test for candida or bacteria overgrowth came back negative....except it also showed that I seriously lacked beneficial bacteria. I figured that not having a good amount of "good guys" would definately mean there was yeast or other "bad guys" taking over that space?? But...nothing showed up in the test. It could have been because I was treating yeast at that time.

Then I got my Enterolab results showing a malabsorption score of 913...positive IgA and positive tTG....so I *assume* that I dont need to be concerned about yeast and just focus on being gluten-free.

Well...I can tell you that shortly after going off my candida diet and adding in fruits, processed gluten-free foods, corn products, sugar, etc...my symptoms started returning.

In the last year I had two more stool tests...one showed a "light" candida albicans overgrowth and the next one showed NO overgrowth. Nothing changed with regards to my diet or my symptoms in between these two tests. I did nothing to "treat" the overgrowth that was detected in one test and yet in the next text it was gone. :huh:

My symptoms are VERY indicative of candida overgrowth and they do flare up if I eat foods that are known to feed yeast. I didnt really *believe* the results of the stool test but I chose to ignore candida...largely because I didnt believe it could contribute this much to my on-going symptoms. I thought maybe it was a small piece of the puzzle and I would address it later on.

I recently got new Dr.'s and started BioSET treatments for my many intolerances. The BioSET testing kept showing candida/yeasts/molds/mycotoxins as being very problematic for me. After it kept coming up and the testing was strongly suggesting that it was bringing me down in a big way....the practitioner started to think maybe I have a severe candida problem. She ordered a bloodtest to check for high antibodies of things that can affect intestinal function.

My IgM yeast antibodies were extremely high at 8196 (normal range 0-2248).

The problem wasnt showing up in the stool tests....whereas the bloodtest is showing a strong immune response to what is obviously high amounts of yeast.

Since Candida is something that exists in all of us....I dont know how its presence in stool can determine whether or not there is an overgrowth or how severe the overgrowth may be.

The antibody test, along with my symptoms and on-going leaky gut pretty much pin-pointed candida as a big culprit for my many intolerances.

My Dr. is addressing the Candida issue right now and the test will probably be repeated down the road....to see if the antibody levels are coming down with treatment.

So yeah....I dont put much stock into stool tests. <_<

Basically the results of the stool tests deterred me from continuing my yeast treatment. :(

The lab that did my bloodtest was Immunosciences Lab. The test was some kind of "Intestinal Barrier Function" test.

I looked up testing and found info. which pretty much says the same thing...bloodtest is the way to go.

The biggest problem in proving the existence of Candida Related Complex in non-immune compromised people is that until very recently, there were no good tests for the condition. Everyone has Candida in their system and in small amounts it is harmless. It is only in larger amounts that Candida is harmful.

Therefore it is tricky to test for Candida. Simply showing that Candida is present in a person's system is useless. What are needed are tests that show how much is present in the system.

The IgA, IgG, and IgM are three tests which are somewhat reliable separately, and together have a good degree of reliability. The candida immune complexes test is even more reliable.

Since none of the tests are 100% reliable....clinical symptoms have greater significance.

It seems like the most reliable test is the candida immune complexes test...

Candida Immune Complexes

An objective and highly specific and sensitive marker of candida overgrowth

In 1987, Dr. Alan Broughton developed a unique assay to measure candida specific IgG immune complexes. Candida immune complexes consist of antigen (candida albicans) bound to IgG antibodies specific to candida albicans and fragments of complement and are an indication that there is active removal of candida antigen. Candida Immune Complexes are also present in direct proportion to the candida antigen load and levels decrease quickly when the candida load is reduced. Candida Immune Complexes have been reported to be an objective, highly specific, and sensitive marker for candida overgrowth. (6,18)

In his studies, Dr. Stuart Lanson has reported that candida immune complexes performed by AAL Reference Laboratories, Inc. are an effective and objective marker for Candida Overgrowth. (6) His study found that 80% of patients with elevated candida immune complex levels respond to antifungal treatment with the candida immune complex level returning to normal when the patient reported improvement. The average length of treatment for patients with post treatment normal immune complexes was 154 days. The average symptom score from pre and post treatment questionnaires were as follows; pre treatment 6.6 and post treatment 1.8 which is a highly significant reduction (p=<0.001, Student t test). This demonstrates that 80% of patients who presented with candida overgrowth symptoms and had elevated candida immune complexes were cured after treatment with an antifungal regime.

The 20% of patients whose immune complexes remained positive after nine months of treatment showed no reduction in their symptom score. These patients were diagnosed with chronic unresponsive candida overgrowth.

Chronic Unresponsive Candida Overgrowth

These chronic unresponsive patients were further studied and reported in a recent paper by Drs. Lanson and Broughton. (7) Chronic unresponsive candida overgrowth patients were compared to patients known to have elevated candida immune complexes but not under treatment, and a group of apparently healthy volunteers who were selected as controls.

The following tests were performed on all three groups: Candida Immune Complexes, IgA and IgG antibodies to casein and gliadin and Total Phagocytic Index and Ingestion Index

This study found that chronic unresponsive candida overgrowth patients had the following:

* Significantly higher candida immune complex levels than the other groups.

* Increased intestinal permeability as shown by the presence of antibodies to casein or gliadin (IgA antibodies suggesting current permeability and IgG suggesting past permeability). (8-12)

* A decrease of leucocyte phagocytosis both adhesion (Total Phagocytosis Index) and ingestment of particles (Ingestion Index).

This study also demonstrated that there is an inverse relationship between the candida immune complex level and the total phagocytosis index. But the ingestion index was independent of the candida immune complex level. This demonstrates that the presence of chronic candida overgrowth is associated with difficulty in the first phase of phagocytosis (adhesion of particles prior to ingestion).

Increased Intestinal Permeability

Increased permeability will allow the passage through the bowel of metabolites usually prevented by an intact bowel. These metabolites include the casomorphines and gliadomorphines from casein and gliadin respectively. These metabolites have been reported in the urine and serum of other conditions of increased intestinal permeability such as regional ileitis, (11) and may account for some of the symptoms associated with chronic unresponsive candida overgrowth. These patients develop intestinal permeability because of the progressive colonization of the gut wall by the candida that results in damage to the protein barrier in the lumen of the bowel. The appearance of symptoms related to delayed food allergy may also be related to increased intestinal permeability which allows foods across a normally intact membrane.

Removal of particularly gliadin and casein from the diet will produce temporary relief of some of the symptoms. After three months gliadin and casein should be reintroduced and the Intestinal Permeability Evaluation #2330 repeated one month after the reintroduction of casein and gliadin. If the IgA antibodies have disappeared then the intestinal permeability has been cured. But if they still have IgA antibodies then the patient should return to the casein and gliadin free diet. At this point gluten sensitivity should be excluded by testing for endomysial and reticulin antibodies (test #369 & 370). If the endomysial and reticulin antibodies are positive, the patient must stay on the gliadin free diet for the rest of their life. If these antibodies are negative then the patient has a bowel with active intestinal permeability which may take months to heal.

I found it interesting that the people who didnt respond to candida treatment were then tested for gluten and casein antibodies.

Its an interesting article and seems to furthur support the relationship between candida, gluten and leaky gut.

http://www.Lame Advertisement/p/articles/mi_...i_n6110584/pg_1

What movie were you going to see?

"The Holiday" I already saw it once and it was one of the cutest movies ever. I LOVED it. :)

My friend wanted to see it and I dont mind watching it again.

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Removal of particularly gliadin and casein from the diet will produce temporary relief of some of the symptoms. After three months gliadin and casein should be reintroduced and the Intestinal Permeability Evaluation #2330 repeated one month after the reintroduction of casein and gliadin. If the IgA antibodies have disappeared then the intestinal permeability has been cured. But if they still have IgA antibodies then the patient should return to the casein and gliadin free diet. At this point gluten sensitivity should be excluded by testing for endomysial and reticulin antibodies (test #369 & 370). If the endomysial and reticulin antibodies are positive, the patient must stay on the gliadin free diet for the rest of their life. If these antibodies are negative then the patient has a bowel with active intestinal permeability which may take months to heal.

If I'm reading this right....its saying that IgA antibodies to both gluten and casein (without Celiac) are a direct result of leaky gut. If the leaky gut is healed....these IgA antibodies can disappear...even with gluten and casein being included in the diet.

Hmmmm....this goes completely against Enterolab's opinion that all elevated IgA antibodies are "for life". <_<

I never quite understood this anyway....if Enterolab IgA results are positive for egg, yeast or soy....they say you need to avoid these for life...the same as you would gluten?? :blink:

It doesnt make sense to me.....it seems more likely that the immune response is caused by leaky gut....and not that you would need to avoid these foods for life....unless of course.....you continue to have a leaky gut. These are actually the foods that are very likely to cause immune reactions with a persistant leaky gut...with gluten and dairy at the top of the list.

Obviously, if you have genetic markers for Celiac and have elevated IgA due to leaky gut....you should stay off gluten regardless of what shows up with Endomysial, reticulin or tissue transglutinamse testing.

Well.....thats just my opinion. :)

But what about me...I dont have Celiac markers?? :unsure:

I asked this question about a gazzilion times and never got an answer...

"If tTG is specific for celiac disease....then why are people with no genetic marker for Celiac coming back with positive tTG in Enterolab stool tests?? :unsure:

I did not believe that my elevated tTG and malabsorption were caused solely by gluten....because the problem is still there and I've been off gluten nearly two years now. <_<

Maybe I finally have my answer with this new research....along with my recent test reults showing high levels of candida??? :huh:

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If I'm reading this right....its saying that IgA antibodies to both gluten and casein (without Celiac) are a direct result of leaky gut. If the leaky gut is healed....these IgA antibodies can disappear...even with gluten and casein being included in the diet.

Thanks Rachel for a very interesting post. It would explain all my problems perfectly. I've been gluten free for almost three years and last spring I went on a very strict anti candida diet for six months. It didn't resolve the candida but I did feel lots better. I got worried though that I was building up deficiencies and stopped in the autumn. Since then I have digestive problems and my skin has gone to pot, I also had bad nightmares for a while when I went back to sugar/fruit/yeast products. I had decided that I'd go back on a modified form of the diet including fruit because I find that the hardest thing to stop eating and from time to time wine when I eat with friends. I don't think I can completely rid myself of Candida as I've realised its stress related and there's something that I can't change in my life at the moment. A big thanks anyway, its nice to know that there's a logical reason to whats happening and I'm not just imagining it!

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I read through quickly, but I think I have the just of it. I didn't feel 100% better after going gluten-free. I went to a doctor who did a 3 day stool test and said that I had slightly high candida. I also had and amoeba and other nasty bacteria and almost no good bacteria. I took antibiotics then started on antifungals and probiotics to get rid of the candida and get some more good bacteria in there. The antibiotics made me feel terrible but I didn't feel better after I finished with them. I tried nystatin and then Threelac and feel like I kicked the candida. I have felt 100% for about 6 months now just being on the gluten-free diet.

I did have a negative blood test for celiac but I have never had genetic testing. My mother has celiac and we think her father did as well.

Not exactly sure how my situation fits into this research but I know I feel much better after getting rid of the candida.

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Thanks Rachel for all the work it took to share this information. I always learn so much from you and appreciated it so much. I've suffered since 1982 from candida. Its so hard to get it under control. I have to work on it again, I know I've been saying that for the past 8 mo. but I hate being on the diet so much I get in a state of denial.

It doesn't surprize me in the least candida gives the same symptoms as gluten. I'm like you....how do you find yourself free from this and get the gut looking healthy again. That would clear up all food intolerances and the many symptoms that involves. I still think there's other reason why some are prone to this. Mine was stress all through my childhood. Matters of abuse that I won't get into. I still think there's more to it though.

I'll have to start visiting OMG some more. I try to every now and then because its so helpful. I think you should go on to school Rachel your way to smarter then you realize.

Gail

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Rachel and Nancy:

Thank you so much for sharing your research with us. I have tried to understand what you have written, although I have been in a deep fog recently.

My gluten reactions are rare these days, but I have a serious problem with malabsorption. Back to the B-12 shots again.

Which leads to ask of few questions"

1. Can Leaky gut can result in elevated liver enzymes and a high white blood count?

2. With no evidence of recent gluten autoimmune reaction, if Candida is present in the gut, will absorption of the good stuff be hindered into the blood causing malabsorption?

I was feeling so good and recently I am back to the fatigue, gait issues and really have the tongue thing going on.

Thank you for your advise.

Lisa

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Thank you so much for sharing your research with us. I have tried to understand what you have written, although I have been in a deep fog recently.

Lisa,

Basically what I was saying is that the research suggests that Candida can possibly trigger Celiac Disease and also be a reason for having the same symtoms while on a gluten-free diet.

The research states that the exact sequence in gluten which is known to trigger the immune response in Celiac is also found in the candida cell wall.

It would make sense that the immune system could attack candida in the same way that it attacks gluten and the person would still suffer symptoms.....as if the gluten-free diet isnt working or as if they are still getting glutened.

1. Can Leaky gut can result in elevated liver enzymes and a high white blood count?

Are you on prescription mediactions at all?? Meds can be a reason for elevated liver enzymes. I normally do not have elevated enzymes (and I do have leaky gut) however, I had one test come back high right after taking antibiotics. They waited a bit and retested and they were back to normal.

Another cause for elevated liver enzymes can be infection.....viral, bacteria or parasitic infections could lead to elevated liver enzymes.

Are the liver enzymes always high? Have they done any tests to try to find out why?? Liver disease could be another reason....hopefully they've ruled that out??

I dont know if leaky gut itself can cause elevated liver enzymes but if you have leaky gut it could be that an infection is keeping the gut from healing and that same infection is also causing elevated liver enzymes.

Infection is also a cause for high white blood cell count. Chronic or hidden infections can lead to high WBC. Some medications can cause it too.

If you're not taking meds that can contribute to elevated enzymes or high WBC....then it might be worthwhile to get infections ruled out.

2. With no evidence of recent gluten autoimmune reaction, if Candida is present in the gut, will absorption of the good stuff be hindered into the blood causing malabsorption?

I was feeling so good and recently I am back to the fatigue, gait issues and really have the tongue thing going on.

Yup....candida overgrowth leads to malabsorption. My malabsorption score was very high (almost severe) when I tested with Enterolab 4 months after going gluten-free. I believe it was largely caused by Candida.

Candida can basically cause the same type of symptoms that are caused by Celiac. The toxins produced by Candida damage the intestinal lining. Also candida can attach itself to the intestinal wall and actually poke holes into the gut causing the leaky gut.

When the gut is leaky you are not able to efficiently absorb nutrients from your food.

The leaky gut syndrome can cause the malabsorption of many important micronutrients. The inflammatory process causes swelling (edema) and the presence of many noxious chemicals all of which can block the absorption of vitamins and essential amino acids. A leaky gut does not absorb nutrients properly. Bloating, gas and cramps occur as do a long list of vitamin and mineral deficiencies. Eventually, systemic complaints like fatigue, headaches, memory loss, poor concentration or irritability develop.
These are the stages of leaky gut....

The 7 stages of the 'inflamed
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Thank you so much and wil digest in the am.

Thank you for you time.

Lisa

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Lisa....there is a new thread about liver enzymes floating around right now....have you seen it??

What I find interesting is that some of the scientists and researchers are saying that autoimmune disease is triggered by these infections (yeasts, parasites, bacteria, etc.) and these are the same type of infections that can cause elevated liver enzymes.

So when people are saying there is a link between Celiac and elevated liver enzymes....there obviously is....but I dont believe its the Celiac Disease thats causing the elevated liver enzymes.

It would make more sense that if someone had an infection which triggered autoimmune disease (i.e. Celiac) and that infection was still present...and chronic...this would be a reason for occassional or consistent results of elevated liver enzymes.

It doesnt make sense to me that someone whos been gluten-free for years would still get elevated liver enzymes due to Celiac Disease. :unsure:

I think the answers for people with Celiac and ongoing symptoms can be found by determining what triggered the Celiac to begin with. What stressed out the immune system enough that it launched an attack on the body that it was designed to protect??

Also it doesnt make sense to me that a person continues to develop more autoimmune disease after Celiac. Yes....there is a definate pattern that those who develop one autoimmune disease commonly develop another.

It wouldnt make sense to me to say that these other diseases were caused by Celiac....these are all seperate autoimmune diseases and if they keep developing...it seems likely that *something* is triggering this within the body. Something that probably should NOT be there.

I dont think a healthy body and a healthy immune system launches attacks on itself for no good reason. :huh:

I dont think that a person with a diagnosis of Celiac has to "accept" a life of continued problems. If the symptoms persist or progress.....or even new diseases pop up...most likely its seperate from having Celiac and something else is going on. Symptoms shouldnt persist long after a person goes off of gluten....and they certainly shouldnt get worse.

Lisa....I dont think I'm very good at explaining my thoughts in a way thats easy to understand. I probably make things more complicated than they need to be. :wacko: Just tell me if I dont make sense and I'll try again. :)

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Thank you so much. I have taken notes and think a well prepared visit to the dr's is near.

Lisa

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What an INTERESTING post. I haven't checked in here in AGES. I was doing a search on gluten intolerance and candida and found Rachels post. My problems began at birth and progessed and I'll be 58 this year. Several years ago my doctor suggested gluten intolerance and I thought he was nuts. All the blood work was negative (including complete new testing by the allergy doctor I was seeing at the time). I did the enterolabs test and was positive for gluten intolerance but no fecal fat. I was strict for about 6 months but still very symptomatic (except maybe my intestines felt a little better). But now when I cheat on wheat I suffer so I don't. Long story short is that my search has led me back to candida and I intend to treat it and treat it well. It was treated by two doctors but not very well. I never associated my symptoms by what I ate and was bummed to find out that all of a sudden I couldn't have gluten. Now I wonder if what I really have is severe candida. Time will tell I guess. I have some Three Lac comming which I was told several years ago was overrated, overpriced and didn't work. However, I've read some amazing testimonies including e-mailing a guy who claims it did WONDERS for his wife. At my age and with all I've done (long story) it can't hurt to try. Thanks for all the research. INTERESTING to say the least. Carol B

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maybe a silly question but what is the OMG board?

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Long story short is that my search has led me back to candida and I intend to treat it and treat it well.

Good for you!! :)

This is what I'm doing right now as well. I'm taking Nystatin and LOTS of raw garlic. Everything I've read indicates that garlic is a highly effective antifungal. Its worked for me in the past and it gives me some symptoms of die-off which is actually stronger than the response I get from Nystatin.

I'm also back on the diet. No more ice cream for me. :(

Good luck!!!

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maybe a silly question but what is the OMG board?

Hi...its not a silly question. ;)

Its actually a thread on this board titled "OMG...I might be on to something.....When the gluten-free diet isnt enough". Its located in the "Other Food Intolerance and Leaky Gut" forum.

Its just a thread where we've had discussions about this topic and many others. :)

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Thanks for all the info, Rachel. I may post some of that on Lymenet....unless you'd like to do that yourself??

I knew when I saw all of you folks eating ice cream by the tons, that there were going to be some problems!! :P

What do you eat on the gluten-free and yeast-free diet?? Not much!! :rolleyes: I eat protein and vegetables and I make sure that the vegetables are not the starchy ones.

May I suggest a WONDERFUL product for anyone who thinks they may have a yeast problem?? I've had to watch the candida/yeast issues for more than 6 yrs now and I recently found what I think is the BEST product I've ever taken for this.

It does not kill the candida, but PREVENTS the imbalance of the yeast problem. It's expensive, but you only have to take one per day.....and for many one per week will do. It depends upon how bad your issues are.

I'll try first to give you the link, but if it doesn't go through.....do a google search for Theralac. Do not get it confused with Threelac. Theralac is WAY better, in my opinion.

www.theralac.com

Thanks for bringing this research to this link, Rachel. I haven't been able to keep up with that OMG thread myself!! Overwhelming to this Lymehead!! B)

Oh....and here is some more info on the subject.

http://www.wholeapproach.com/diet/

"Successful control and elminiation of a Candida Albicans overgrowth requires a multifaceted program as described below. Failure to follow ALL the steps simultaneously will result in slow progress and will lengthen healing time significantly. The program should be tailored to the individual and must balance the need to eliminate the Candida and deprive it of its food source while insuring proper nutrition for the individual."

Five Steps to Candida Elimination:

1. You must starve it into submission by eliminating its food source.

2. You must kill it with anti-fungal herbs and supplements. [e.g....garlic, onion, caprylic acid, Pau D'Arco capsules or tea, clove, grapefruit seed extract, olive leaf extract, oil of oregano, tea tree oil, Echinacea, Goldenseal, black walnut, MSM, barberry root, uva ursi, neem leaf, biotin]

3. You must reestablish the proper balance and quantity of probiotic bacteria in the digestive tract. [...multi-strain lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidus capsules with FOS should be taken between meals to maximize repopulation of the digestive tract by beneficial bacteria.]

4. You must reestablish proper levels of all B vitamins (yeast free) and utilize other immune enhancing supplements to boost immune system function. [e.g ... B complex vitamins (yeast free), biotin, beta 1-3 glucan, colostrum, maitake mushroom, vitamins A, C, E, zinc and selenium]

5. You must cleanse and heal the digestive tract to promote proper elimination of toxins and Candida and assimilation of nutrients. [e.g...chlorophyll, MSM, omega 3 fatty acids found in flax seed and salmon oils, GLA found in borage, evening primrose and black currant oils. Pantothenic acid, digestive enzymes between meals]

I have another link that this site will for some anal reason not allow. It's from Lame Advertisement and has info on all the specifics of the diet.

You can PM me for that info.

Gayle

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