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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Hydrolized Corn Gluten
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lovegrov    148

It's safe. Corn does have gluten but it is not a problem for people with celiac.

richard

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tarnalberry    314

Technically, gluten is a generic term for any protein in a grain. So, the protein that corn has, is *technically* called gluten. But we commonly use gluten (around here, particularly, to refer to wheat, rye, barley, and oat gluten specifically. Corn gluten is fine for celiacs (who don't also have a corn intolerance ;-) ).

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celiac3270    4

Interesting.........that sort of confused me, too.......that a corn gluten could be gluten-free......I would've immediately thought that it was bad, kind of like one might think that buckwheat or maltodextrin is bad.

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kirst4588    0

some maltodextrine *is* bad, you have to check with the manufactorer to see if it is derived from wheat or corn - unless they have already voluntarilly adhered to the new legislation for labeling and put the source in parenthesis

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celiac3270    4

No, you're correct; it can be bad, it's just that you might incorreclty assume from the ingredient, whose name contains both malt (a gluten-containing ingredient) and dextrin (possibly a gluten-containing ingredient) that the actual ingredient contains either of those and therefore isn't gluten-free. Although maltodextrin can contain gluten, it can also be gluten-free......I was just using it as an example of one of those ingredients that you might think is bad from the name, sort of like the one discussed here, corn gluten.

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celiac3270    4

Oh, by the way, I just looked up maltodextrin on the site....I didn't realize this, but now (don't think it was this way before), it IS gluten-free for sure in the USA (don't know what is the deal in Canada) unless in vitamins....here is what I got from celiac.com:

8) Maltodextrin is prepared as a white powder or concentrated solution by partial hydrolysis of corn starch or potato starch with safe and suitable acids and enzymes. (1) Maltodextrin, when listed on food sold in the USA, must be (per FDA regulation) made from corn or potato. This rule does NOT apply to vitamin or mineral supplements and medications. (2) Donald Kasarda Ph.D., a research chemist specializing on grain proteins, of the United States Department of Agriculture, found that all maltodextrins in the USA are made from corn starch, using enzymes that are NOT derived from wheat, rye, barley, or oats. On that basis he believes that celiacs need not be too concerned about maltodextrins, though he cautions that there is no guarantee that a manufacturer won't change their process to use wheat starch or a gluten-based enzyme in the future.

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