• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Blood Tests And Gluten Challenge
0

6 posts in this topic

Hi. I'm new to the forum, but not new to celiac disease. My daughter, now 46 was born with it. I was told I probably had it (by a physician) but never tested until this yr. First test I had been strictly gluten -free for 2 mos. IGA and IGG were negative. So was the endomesial antibody IGA.

So I did a gluten challenge for three weeks. Tested again. Everything negative but Endomesial antibody went up to just enter the positive range, exactly 1:5.

I'm thinking now I should be on gluten a longer time and test again, because the longer I am on a ciet containing gluten, the more digestive distress I am having.

1. Can anyone explain what the higher endomesial antibody test results might indicate? Should I pursue more testing after a longer gluten challenge?

2. What is an ARA test? Should I have had it or did I already under one of the other names?

3. The nurse read my report to me over the phone, at my request, and mentioned a term that included the words tissue transference (not sure I got it right, but the number she gave me on that was 13, whatever that may mean.

I will meet with my dr. and get these things clear, but frankly I don't think she knows that much about celiac disease or the tests.

I'd like to go armed with the right questions to ask! :)

Thanks for sharing iwhatever nformation you can. Elsie

p.s. I've suffered digestive problems all my life, sometimes called colitis and more recently irritable bowel or "food sensitivities." After being treated for non-hodgkins lymphoma two yrs. ago and learning the higher risk for that among Celiac patients I feel I need to get serious about a definite diagnosis to preserve my present health.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Here's a great site for explaining all those acrnyms:

http://labtestsonline.net/

I hope you find an answer soon. It sounds like you would definitely benefit from a gluten-free lifestyle.

Hope this helps!

Karen

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Karen, thanks. I checked the site and obtained some useful information. Elsie

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I may be able to help.

I think the test (#3 on your list) is called Tissue transglutamase

Here is a link to a laboratory test information guide for this test:

http://www.lhsc.on.ca/cgibin/view_labtest....mase%20antibody

If this was the test you had and you had a reading of 13 than I think it means you MAY have tested positive for celiac (I'm not a doctor!). It says on the website that a normal reading is less than 10 U/ml. But it also says "Tissue Transglutamase may give persistent mildly elevated results in the absence of disease". Definitely worth looking into! Of coarse check this info with your doctor.

Tissue transglutamase is the blood test that I had and I was told that this blood test is vey specific for celiac disease.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Different labs use a different reference range. For the Tissue Transglutaminase test most labs say under 20 is negative, a few use under 10 as negative. It is the most specific bloodtest for Celiac.

ARA is Anti-Reticulin Antibody. It is as far as I can tell an outdated bloodtest that very few doctors or labs rely on anymore for Celiac testing. It is still included in some celiac panels though. On mine it said I was negative for the screening test for it, so the actual test was never performed.

The fact that your IgA endomysial antibody went up when you went back on gluten is an indication that gluten may be causing your symptoms, but if you want a definative diagnosis you would have to go back on gluten for anywhere from 3-6 months or more to get more accurate test results. Otherwise you could just continue on the gluten free diet and see if it helps. I went back on gluten for two months and it was not long enough to show my doctor the damage she wanted to see to give the diagnosis of Celiac. I opted for Enterolab testing to get my answers. I am very happy with their testing methods and it is certainly an option. You can check them out at http://www.enterolab.com

God bless,

Mariann

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


ARA can - as far as I've been able to discover - indicate either autoimmune kidney problems as well, but usually celiac. It's actually relatively specific (in theory), but not very sensitive. (Plenty of celiacs won't have it raised.) That, actually, was my only positive test. (I couldn't get any values on the rest, so I don't know if they were borderline.) When I combined that with a positive result when going on the diet - and doing a dietary challenge - I took that as my answer. It is an indirect test though, and definitely not too many doctors run it any more.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,346
    • Total Posts
      935,634
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      65,026
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    lcook9@my.wgu.edu
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • While you could very well be vitamin/mineral deficient, you could also have issues with your thyroid.  Autoimmune thyroid is common with .......autoimmune celiac disease.  Your doctor should order a full thyroid panel, including thyroid antibodies.   Your blood sugar should also be checked (autoimmune diabetes).  I am not saying you have these issues, but these AI issues are common with celiac disease.  In fact, you can develop or have more than one AI issue.   If I feel a very strong need to nap, I know my thyroid is off and my doctor should be notified.  A simple blood test usually verifies that an adjustment to my thyroid replacement is needed.   That said, you are in the healing stages of celiac disease.   Eat healthy and include plenty of fats to keep you satiated.  Try to avoid processed foods.  Make sure that gluten-free diet is varied and full of veggies.  Get plenty of rest.  Just listen to your body.  Soon you will feel much better.  
    • Hi and welcome Can you tell us a little about your diet? What are you eating on a typical day? You may find that some simple switches in food choices can deliver more energy and fewer spikes and crashes. This is something that receives too little attention, particularly from the medical community. It can come as a huge shock to the system and as the implications become apparent its easy to feel overwhelmed. This certainly happened to me and many others here so first do know that you're not alone. You are currently grieving believe it or not and you will be going through the stages of grief.  Second, although it may not feel it now, it WILL get better and you will adjust and adapt as you get used to the diet and start focusing on what you can still do rather than what you can't.  In the meantime, this is a good place to vent and share those feelings as they are perfectly natural and understandable and whilst not always helpful,  they are a part of you and a part of the healing process. Go easy on yourself, this is very early days. You are young, which is good news, it means you will heal sooner and you will adapt quicker and there's lots of good things on the way for you as your body gets a rest from the gluten that's been holding you back.  All the best! Matt
    • Hope it proves of use  The Umberto Volta interview is particularly interesting and the case study from England also...
    • Following a gallbladder surgery, I could not get my digestive system back to normal.  After several months of constant diarrhea, I went to see the gastro dr. and told her my problems. I also mentioned that I had a sister, brother and nephew with Celiacs.  She said, "I'm almost sure that's the problem".  I, like you, did not want to go back to eating gluten so I did the gene test but it was not positive.  I learned it is not always an exact test.  It came back with Crohns which so far I have no symptoms.  The Endoscopy  indicated Hpylori, CDiff, and one other bacteria.  After I took all the meds to clear my body of these bacterias, I was still having  some symptons of diarrhea and found that I thought I was clear of all gluten but I had a long way to go. Throwing away a wooden cutting board my dad had given me, lipstick, lipgloss, makeup, handcream, plastics in the kitchen, pans that had a scratch, any item in the pantry that had any of the items with starch that may have gluten and the list goes on and on.  I'm still reading labels but I definately can tell a difference as I have eliminated more items that I had no idea were harmful.  This website has been a life-saver for me.  Thank You so much for your wealth of information.   Linda Fortson    
  • Upcoming Events