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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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rutland

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After avoiding all the suspect foods for several months I decided to all back soy to my diet. My Chiropracter keeps telling me how good it is to make smoothies with berries, flax, and soy protein. I bought a packet of soy protein and decided to make it, and MAN, I feel awful. My heart started to race, my head hurt, and I felt depressed, like jumping out of my own skin. Its such an uncomfortable feeling. It like no matter what I wear or how I sit, Im uncomfortable.

Has anyone had this kind of reaction to soy? Im not touching it again.

Steph

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Hi,

Soy can be allergenic for some people. It also has major effects on thyroid function for sensitive people (this would possibly explain the depression, racing heart, etc). You can read up on soy on the Weston A Price website (just type that into your browser).

If you are going to try soy again, stick to the unprocessed traditional foods (like tofu, tempeh), etc and in strict moderation. Soy milk and protein are concentrated. Fermented soy products (like soy sauce - if you can find one without the wheat) are supposed to be ok, cause the fermentation process destroys the harmful components...

I have hypothyroid so try to avoid soy all together (though once in a blue moon I do eat a bit of tofu, which I love.

Sally

After avoiding all the suspect foods for several months I decided to all back soy to my diet. My Chiropracter keeps telling me how good it is to make smoothies with berries, flax, and soy protein. I bought a packet of soy protein and decided to make it, and MAN, I feel awful. My heart started to race, my head hurt, and I felt depressed, like jumping out of my own skin. Its such an uncomfortable feeling. It like no matter what I wear or how I sit, Im uncomfortable.

Has anyone had this kind of reaction to soy? Im not touching it again.

Steph

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I used to eat a lot of soy. Tiger's Milk bars, roasted soy nuts, canned soybeans, vegetarian burgers and even Edamame. I developed a wacky thyroid problem where I'd go from from hyper to hypo and was really suffering. Then I read about the connection of soy to thyroid. I cut back on the soy. And as I did, my thyroid meds were also cut back. Only when I finally decided to eliminate it totally, save for the occasional product with soy lecithin in it, did I finally get off the thyriod meds! And no more symptoms like the racing heartbeat, overheating, brain fog, etc.

Daughter is allergic to soy so I generally try not to buy anything with it in there. But we both have an egg allergy as well, mine severe. Sometimes I have no choice but to buy something with lecithin in there and if I do, it's soy and not egg based.

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Eating soy as a large part of your diet as a celiac is IMHO just asking for another intolerance.

I'm not rabidly anti-soy.... I just think its one of those things where if you start relying on it as a protein source its asking for trouble.

If it were me I'd take it as a warning shot and stay well away :D (I just try and moderate soy,)

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It is true, after we celiac's eliminate the gluten from our diets, usually soy is the next intolerance's to pop up. The only soy I get now is soy lecithin and in margarine--I try to buy butter, yet I do not like it as much. They say that many soy intolerant people can handle some of the oil, something about the heating process making it change--not sure anymore.

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It is true, after we celiac's eliminate the gluten from our diets, usually soy is the next intolerance's to pop up. The only soy I get now is soy lecithin and in margarine--I try to buy butter, yet I do not like it as much. They say that many soy intolerant people can handle some of the oil, something about the heating process making it change--not sure anymore.

I tested as soy intolerant (among other things). When I questioned Enterolab, they said they thought that soy lecithin would be OK. I assume this is because it wouldn't have any of the offending proteins. In my research, I've seen some say that soybean oil is OK. But other sites say that it depends on how the oil is derived from the beans. Too complicated -- I just avoid the stuff.

Even before I found I was soy intolerant -- I've read that it can be something with very subtle symptoms -- I cut out isolated soy proteins because I don't think they are healthy.

Since you (rutland) had a reaction -- to the soy or something else in the powder -- you might try eliminating soy for a few weeks (the stuff IS everywhere :blink: ) and see how you feel. I really wondered about my test result. Then, after a few weeks off soy, I found my, uh, body output to be downright normal and a couple other symptoms that I had no idea were food related cleared up. I accidentally challenged by taking a supplement that I had assumed was soy free and wasn't. My first clue was when the symptoms cropped up again. Stopped taking the supplement and everything was OK.

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