• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

New Lactose Problems?
0

27 posts in this topic

Lately I've been noticing that whenever I have milk my stomach becomes incredibly burbly and noisy. I mainly use soymilk, but I use butter, cheese, sour cream, yogurt, etc. A couple days ago I was in a constant state of discomfort after having a small bowl of cereal with lf milk. Yesterday, I avoided everything until I had a piece of cheese (without even thinking about it.) Then I was mildly burbly. Today I had yogurt for breakfast and NO PROBLEM. But at lunch I fixed enchiladas with cheese and sour cream and am now mildly burbly and uncomfortable. It's almost enough to make me cry! Is this a "serious" lactose problem or is this just one of those things I can basically ignore by using lactaid or acidophilous or whatever (and just stay away from milk?) Any suggestions? Just the thought of having to go CF too makes me so depressed (and here I'd thought I'd handled the diet change so well.) :(

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Try using 'lactaid' supplements (chewable tablets) when you consume milk products OR try 'Lactaid' or Dairy Ease or any lactose free brands of milk instead. Yogurt bacteria help digest lactose, so yogurt may not give you similar symptoms. Many of us noticed problems with other foods AFTER we eliminated the gluten, because we didn't experience the extreme gluten reaction symptoms anymore. Since you don't have problems with yogurt, you probably don't have casein (milk protein in all cow's milk products) intolerance, but you could have lactose (milk sugar) intolerance. That's easier to fix by using lactaid supplements while you still enjoy dairy products. ;)

BURDEE

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are your lactose intolerance symptoms worse through times of stress? I have found that is the case with me... just wondering if that could be a factor for you as well.

Gretchen

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started using goats milk and it has been going well but then early this week I used cows milk and whoa my body was not happy. I stopped eatching cheese and stuff, too. It's frustrating.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to say, in a relative sense, my lactose problems are the worst they've ever been (since I never noticed them before) and the stress level currently is pretty darned low. Go figure! So, I'm going to try the lactaid tablets. I had a bit of cheese with dinner tonight and I'm not really uncomfortable, but definitely not feeling as good as I was before dinner. Earlier I had something with a little reddi wip on it and wasn't feeling too great after that either.

Would acidophilous (spelling?) work like lactaid? I have some of those in my fridge.

Thank you for the info on the difference between lactose and casein reactions! It definitely isn't a problem with yogurt, in fact, I tend to feel better all day if I eat some (and now I know why.) It is interesting that other problems do become more obvious as we clear our bodies from gluten. I really haven't ever felt as good as I do now (except for the lactose thing.) I'm certainly more aware of how my body reacts to foods than I've ever been (had I ever really thought of it before? I can't remember.)

Thank you for your help here. I feel MUCH better.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


No, acidophilus won't help with lactose intolerance. You need the lactase enzyme (contained in those lactaid supplements) to digest lactose. Before I learned about 'lactaid', I tried acidophilus milk, which did ZIP for my lactose intolerance symptoms ... but then I also have cow's milk intolerance (lactose, casein, whey or whatever's in cow's milk). Try the 'lactaid' or generic lactase enzymes--Rite Aid stores carry a cheaper version with the same potency.

BURDEE

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How long have you been gluten-free? The lactose enzyme is on the tip of the villi. So, if your villi are still not completely grown back, or are still lower than the crypt cell, then the lactose enzyme might not be abundant in your system. I take a pill called WHOLE ENZYME with every meal. You can get it at whole foods. It contains all of the enzymes that your body should naturally make. I had problems with milk too - the enzyme supplement cured it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Interesting about the enzyme, I'll have to consider that (though price is an issue too. I'll do a comparison shop, lol) I've been gluten-free, with the occasional accidental consumption, for about 7 months now. How long does it take for the villi to completely recover?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it is 6 months to 2 years, but each person is different and there is refractive?? celiacs in which people don't see a huge response to the gluten-free diet. My villi seem to want to take the long road to healing. From what I was told from my GI, the villi are suppose to be in a 4:1 ratio with the cell (villi:cell), i.e the villi are 4 times higher than the cell and thus able to absorb nutrients. My villi were 0:1, i.e non existent at dignosis (July 18th 2003) and are now 1:1 (May 2004). Such is life:)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is also natural in humans to lose the ability to digest lactose over time. In fact, in some major populations, it's rare to be able to continue digesting large amounts of lactose past the age of two. (It's a genetic thing that occured after the advent of dairy sources that provided a large enough survival advantage that the ability to continue consuming dairy after weaning has made big inrodes in the gene pool.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Hi everybody, just wanted to say that you may want to look at a bunch of info I just posted on a post entitled "Kefir", there is an article their about how kefir culture improves milk/lactose digestion as well as others that show that kefir recolonizes the intestines with probiotics (and kicks Candida out by the way), heals the intestines, improves the immune system, creates enzymes and is a wonderful source of vitamins and minerals. I will say that digestive enzymes are great but since drinking kefir, I don't need to supplement them anymore.

Hope this helps everybody!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2 cents - my lactose/casien intolerance has gone from mild to bad to worse over the last 5 years. Even with lactose tablets - I now avoid it completely, just like all the other foods that make me sick. I have switched to goat's milk too, although I am still adjusting to the taste, like I had to adjust to soy milk when I switched to that years ago which I have had to give up due to soy bean intolerance. However, my mother can still eat ice cream and drink milk occasionally if she takes the pills and she has been lactose intolerant longer than me.

-Kate

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Kate: I had a similar experience. Lactaid pills seemed to help me for years. But when I had excruciating undiagnosed celiac pain, avoiding gluten reduced most of that pain. When I did Enterolab tests for gluten and milk sensitivity, I learned the source of the rest of my symptoms: CASEIN (the milk protein) antibodies/intolerance. So lactaid pills for lactose (milk sugar) didn't prevent my casein reaction. I also had intolerance to soy, so I just avoid all dairy products (and soy/dairy substitutes). Another friend whose E-lab results told her she had casein intolerance tried goat's milk with disastrous results. I read that goat's milk STILL has casein, just not as much as cow's milk. So I don't want to risk a reaction. Avoiding gluten/dairy/soy is challenging, but well worth it on 'good' days. :D

BURDEE

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's one of the biggest bummers about being casein intolerant - no more kefir. (And I really haven't been able to get into goat's milk enough to get past the nausea at the taste to see if I tolerate it. ;-) )

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, the goat's milk info is interesting and would explain my reaction to pumpkin pie made with goat's milk. No soy for me and I already know I am casien intolerant. Thanks...back to rice milk.

-Kate

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tiffany,

You can still make kefir with another medium, such as rice milk or even water kefir, the culture can feed on any type of sugar, doesn't need to be milk sugar.

Let me know if you would like to know more about it, it is a way to get the probiotics in without dairy.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it makes you feel better at all I am also "becoming" lactose intolerant. I never had any problems before going gluten free but about 4 or 5 months in I started feeling a little sick sometimes. I have now been gluten free for ten months and am now lactose sensitive. I can get away with a little but any more than that and it isn't so good.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Would acidophilous (spelling?) work like lactaid? I have some of those in my fridge.

I started having problems with dairy products after being gluten-free for a few months. I cut out all dairy. But, I was still having some problems. So I started taking milk-free acidophilous everyday. I've been taking it for a few weeks now and have slowly started reintroducing dairy products with no problems. .. Just a thought.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am also sensitive to casein. My doctor just gave me some new pills and the fine print shows there is lactose in the ingredients. I gather lactose is milk sugar, does anyone know if it still contains casein?

thanks Nin :rolleyes:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

while lactose shouldn't contain casein, if you have a very strong allergy to casein, I would avoid it until I contacted the company about contamination. (I'm not sure if lactose is synthetically derived.)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I buy Lactaid Milk and Lactose Free Butter..I can only eat cheese if its baked on something, and even that it doesnt take much to affect me. Its a real pain going to someone else's place, out of town..You cant start carrying milk and butter around with you lol. I never bother with the lactaid pills. i dont think it'd be worth my trouble...

~lisa~

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's easier to carry little chewable lactaid pills than milk or butter to someone's place, out of town, etc. They do help prevent lactose intolerance reactions. However casein/soy intolerance is another story ... I sure miss ice cream, cheese and butter. :(

BURDEE

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What an great board this is! Okay, so I bought some of those lactaid pills (store brand, actually) and, for the first few days ate them whenever I suspected something I was going to eat had lactose in it. It worked great! So then, I thought, I'd check to see what actually was giving me problems, testing and such. Now, I know, if I'm going to have something like ice cream, I have to take one. Cheese, it depends on the quantity. Just a little doesn't bother me, but lots (I like cheese) will. I keep a couple packets in my purse (with the imodium and migraine meds I've not had to use much at all since going gluten-free. :) ) I use lactaid milk now (and really like that extended expiration date!) So far so good! I'm hoping this goes away as my little villi come fully back to life :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How would a person be checked for lactose intolerence? I had not thought it was a problem but recently have been really bad stomach ache's after drinking milk. I hesitate to take yet another item off my do not eat list.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,332
    • Total Posts
      935,528
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,993
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    EmmaLauren
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Former lifeguard and competitive swimmer here. There could be some potential issues, but I think it's pretty unlikely. Here's why I think that: 1. The water volume in a standard 25m pool is enormous (hundreds of thousands of liters). Assuming there are people swimming in the pool, any hot spots are likely to get dissipated pretty fast, so you'd have to swallow a lot of water to get a serious gluten hit. 2. By law (at least in Canada), the water inflow and outflow rates must be such that the volume of water that makes up the pool must be replaced every 24 hours in public pools. There are always some dust bunnies, bandaids and whatnot trapped in the corners at the bottom of the pool, but the main volume you're interacting with gets replaced regularly, so no build-up. Public pools are also vacuumed on a regular basis. For cleaning agents, typically on bleach and baking soda are used in my experience. Private pools are another story and there no guarantees. 3. Most public pools prohibit food on deck due to public health regulations and/or wanting to avoid cleaning up messes. This limits potential sources of gluten to personal care products on other people's skin. Considering the volume of a pool, I'm having trouble imagining this resulting in a significant exposure, but I have also swam in packed outdoor pools that taste like sunblock, so who knows. I would definitely worry if people were eating hot dogs or shotgunning beers in the pool though (definitely a thing at backyard pool parties). 4. Pool chlorine can be either tablet based, liquid based or gas based depending on the pool. Either way, it is bleach-based (sometimes literal bleach gets dumped in smaller volume bodies like hot tubs when the chlorine is off). The pool I worked at, which was newer used liquid injection, and I would imagine this is true of most newer facilities (gas is undesirable as it can leak and kill people because it is odourless - some older pools still have this set-up though). Tablets are more common in backyard pools, and it's possible that these might contain gluten in some form (I have no idea and have never checked).  For reference, the concentration of chlorine in a swimming pool should be between 0.5-5 ppm, depending on the pool temperature and your region (lower for colder pools, higher for hot tubs).  So, I guess my opinion would be that a public pool is most likely pretty safe from a gluten perspective. Chlorine (or rather, the volatile gases resulting from the reaction of chlorine with biological waste in the pool) is an irritant though - occupational asthma rates in lifeguards and swimmers is quite high. Some people are more sensitive to this than others. My dad cannot swim anymore because he becomes ill for a week with severe upper respiratory symptoms (open water swimming is ok). I get similar, but less severe symptoms (part of the reason I don't swim anymore, sadly). Not sure what symptoms you experienced, but something to consider. http://www.ncceh.ca/documents/practice-scenario/pool-chlorination-and-closure-guidelines
    • I look back at photos from a few years ago now and can see the inflammation in my face. I spent decades with my body fighting constantly without my really being aware. Freaked me out when I realised! Few things to think about: If up to 1% of pop are celiac, at much as 6% could be NCGS - further reading here: https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117969-non-celiac-gluten-sensitivity-a-resource/ NCGS can present in the same varied ways as celiac - Not just or even primarily gastro related. I get back pain, chest pain, skin problems, eyesight problems, anxiety, depression, balance issues, nerve tremors and twitches etc. etc Try to treat these next months as a special case. Dial your diet back and eat really basic and simple. I lived on omelettes filled with veggies, huge green salads with olive oil and cider vinegar as dressing and a very simple evening meal with maybe some meat and rice. I ate as little processed foods as I possibly could. So try and avoid sauces, anything in a box really.  Your aiming to help your body heal and to reduce the amount of ingredients going in to the basic safest foods. Eat clean and healthy and avoid any possible gluten source. Spend a bit of time learning about hidden sources of gluten too. This thread will help:  https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/91878-newbie-info-101/   Final point. You may like me eventually have to live life without gluten and without the comfort of a diagnosis that says precisely why. This is not always easy, but what you learn about your body in the next 3 months of this trial could help you to do this. Keep the diary, note your reactions and hopefully when you see the Rheum in 3 months you'll have conducted your own science experiment and have the data you need to make a good decision. Best of luck Matt  
    • Newly diagnosed, who do I tell? I'm not talking friends & family. I am normally private about health matters but I feel it seems I need to tell so many people. Does anyone have a list? Some are obvious like doctor and dentist but one came up for me the other day when my massage therapist asked if I'd had any changes in my health and I said no but halfway through the session realized that, "Duh I should have mentioned Celiac! Clearly the lotion used could be an issue." So who is on your list to tell? Here's who I have so far: Doctor(s) Dentist Restaurant Servers Massage Therapists Hair Stylist Babysitters, Petsitters or Housesitters (anyone who might bring or prepare food in my home)      
    • Hey, I am learning also...make sure you are taking a good multi-vitamin...gluten-free of course.  I have had a few "charlie horse" pains in my thighs and am taking an extra B12 tablet...If you have an ALDI grocery store nearby they have lots of gluten-free items snacks and frozen.  Vitamins will help...you are not getting enough nutrients with what you are eating.
    • I feel the same way! Newly diagnosed (gluten-free since July 1) and never had major GI symptoms mostly neurological issues and other very random stuff. So no red flags to tell me, "You just glutened yourself!" Or at least I haven't identified them yet. I'm not sure if I'm feeling better or not yet. I do have more energy but lots of anxiety and random symptoms that might be celiac related... but who knows. I'm just not sure if this is what "feeling better" is yet. I can't imagine what that is like... or will be like. And I keep reading about people "getting sick" when they are glutened but that is so vague. For me, I'm not sure I'll know if I've actually been glutened or not. I feel like I'm extremely careful but I'm not sure if I'm being over the top, or if I'm doing it right, or not enough and need to do more. I'd just like to get to a nice gluten-free baseline and note what that is like so that I can compare how I used to feel and how I might feel if glutened so that I'll know! Sorry, didn't mean to hijack your thread and provide no answers. I can just relate, that's all.
  • Upcoming Events