• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

Just Curious
0

Rate this topic

19 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Im just curious if any of you now like a food you didnt like before having to go gluten free?

I always have hated chocolate. But now since goiing gluten-free, I seem to love it. I keep some in the freezer so when I have that major attack of I need a sweet, I have some.

Also I never liked squash at all, and now I seem to love it.

Seems my taste buds have re adjusted, since so many things gluten-free I try, well taste yuk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


I definitely realized a difference in my choice of food. I used to hate beans of any kind and now I like them. I used to love tuna fish but lately it has been tasting extra fishy so I haven't really been eating it. I also never liked squash, asparagus or sweet potatoes but now I like all of them. So strange! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
;) there arent many foods that i didnt like, but i have noticed that now i can eat many things that i couldnt before----like i have always loved broccoli and cauliflower, but couldnt eat them because of the diarrhea, not that they still arent gassy :P but at least i can eat them--i couldnt drink orange juice before because of terrible heartburn, now i can drink it with no problem--gluten was interfering at every turn for me and now i can eat things i couldnt before and it's great :D deb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure if this counts --- I didn't used to eat potato chips, but since starting the gluten-free diet in February, I have had probably just as many or more than I had in my entire life prior to the diet. I still liked them before, but I had so many other options and with so much cut out...avoiding lots of sugar and acid in addition to gluten...there just isn't all that much besides potato chips that I can snack on.

I was a VERY picky eater before the diet and I have found that I am far less reluctant to try new mixes and recipes than before...probably because with many of the staple foods in my diet cut out, I need to find new stuff...again, I think I didn't directly answered the question :lol: , but just adding my two cents.

-celiac3270

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I'm only 4 or 5 weeks gluten-free so I can't really say yet, however I'm an eater and there are very few foods I don't like.

Since going gluten-free I've started to try and eat more healthy and I have cut out all chocolate and most sweets totally. I'm eating very little refined carbs and eating more basic foods.

I never ate things like potato chips before and still don't, I'm one of those that watches my weight like a hawk... I have a lot of clothes (shopaholic) and I can't get any bigger or they won't fit and I won't buy anything, not one piece, a size bigger, to me that just gives me permission to get bigger.

So far I don't really miss anything other then pizza and I tried a mix to make a gluten-free pizza crust and so far I'd rather do without.

Susan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, at first my sugar cravings were crazy! I had a sweet tooth before and then it just went nuts! I went through a period where I didn't knnow what to eat and was craving sugar, so I would have ice cream for dinner! It finally balanced out and I actually can't have high levels of sugar now! funny.

Now, since working hard to balance out my diet, I am eating a lot more soy products, vegetables and I added red meat to my diet after 15 years without. With my diet so restricted, I figured I had better add the meat back in.

Now I just try hard to eat a balanced diet, although it doesn't always work. gluten-free isn't exactly CONVENIENT for someone who eats on the run all the time!

-Sara

p.s. thanks for posting on here! It's so good to hear what other people are going through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


The first few months I added salt to EVERYTHING and I rarely used salt before limiting my diet. I have also been going crazy with the potatoes and I haven't really eaten potatoes or chips in years.

I have finally been able to cut back on my salt to almost my former level and well, the potatoes are still there (I can eat them!!!) but not as much as before.

I also eat fruit daily where it used to be a rare thing, I am constantly amazed at how sweet it is...

-Kate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've discovered that my carb cravings, which were very intense, are gone since I gave up dairy. York testing revealed I produce antibodies to milk so I gave them up and the cravings went away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My tastebuds have changed dramatically since going gluten free. I used to not be able to be in the same room as broccoli and now I crave it. I also like beans more than I did before. I still love potatoes pretty much in any form thank God they're gluten-free!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Fruit and yogurt! I ate neither before going gluten-free (though I didn't have anything against them :rolleyes:) and now, it's my favorite breakfast and/or snack. (And, it has to be plain, ff yogurt that I flavor myself. The premixed, sweetened, additived junk turns me off big time.) And fruit, I hadn't realized how sweet it is! Mmm... Oh, and I also eat beans almost daily now, very filling and satisfying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are lots of additives in processed/prepared foods that we stop eating. Once our bodies adjust to more healthy foods that we can actually taste - they taste good. I also believe that our bodies crave things it needs (we might not feed it the right things however). I got on an organic olive binge - rather pricey. Then I read quite by accident that olives have a natural antibiotic in them - go figure!

Alicia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a fairly new celiac (only 6 months), but I have kind of noticed a difference in my tastes. I definitely eat a lot more rice now than I used to. I can also fix a potato in about 5 different ways or more it seems like.

I did, however, meet with a nutritionist about 3 months ago, and she said that it's okay to eat/splurge on something that I really want (i.e. subway, real pasta, pizza) Have you all heard of this? If so, what sort of things do you splurge on, and how often do you splurge?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:angry: your nutritionist is so wrong--WE CAN NOT SPLURGE--never, ever--once you have gone gluten-free eating things that contain gluten will probably make you very sick--we can never have gluten again--the nutritionist needs to take some classes--maybe you should give them this forum to read---deb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I agree with Deb- no cheating!!

The thing is, if you're on a diet say for weight loss and you splurge once in a while, you simply prolong the time it takes to reach your goal. No harm done.

The reason you really shouldn't intentionally "splurge" on a gluten-free diet if you're celiac is that it always does harm to your body. Without fail. Sorry. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't believe a nutritionist would say it's okay to cheat! This person needs some serious training. It's bad enough when we have accidental slip ups, but for a professional to tell you it's okay to cheat is really irresponsible. Even if you don't have an obvious physical reaction, your insides may be affected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:rolleyes: i have mentioned this in another thread, but i will say it again--my mom just had surgery in a big hospital in midland--250 bed--my sister, dad, and i--all celiacs and she is a dietician went to the cafeteria for lunch--my sister asked for the dietician and asked her what was gluten free on her menu :o she had no idea what we were talking about--so judy asked, "havent you served any celiacs in your hospital?" :unsure: and the lady had no idea what a celiac is--a trained dietician who usually always knows more about foods for special diets then doctors do--she didnt know anything--my sis said :angry: "there is not one worker in my kitchen who does not know how to serve a celiac--you had better do some studying!"---there isnt enough info given to these people--i guess it is up to us to get the info out there ;) deb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:) Thanks for your opinions everyone! I really appreciate the imput. I realize it can hurt me to cheat, but I was just following what I was told. The few time I have cheated, it hasn't made me sick at all, but I do realize there can be long term affects. I am definitely going to look into it with my specialist. Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,113
    • Total Posts
      939,741
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      66,099
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    peterson111
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • You finally know what has been slowly and painfully killing you. Recovery will not be quick but it will come. You will find yourself running up the stairs in 6 months and will sit sobbing at the top for half an hour. It will be about 5 years and lots of PT before you will walk normally again but not long ago you remodeled the bathroom because you were told you would be in a wheelchair soon. The nightly agonizing hours in the bathroom will be replaced with a solid eight hours sleep now except when you accidentally get glutened. Those glutening will come farther and farther apart though as you get better at the lifestyle.  It seems like there is nothing you can eat right now but that will change as more folks are diagnosed and more foods become better labeled.  Your skin will heal and your hair will grow back. That early gray isn't going away but eventually you will prefer it to having to dye it every three weeks or so because it now grows faster than it has at any time in your life. You will have lots of times that you feel sorry for yourself but a quick trip to look at that tackle box full of meds you no longer need will be a comfort. You will have some residual damage even years later but nothing you can't handle. You will be able to work again and to go back and finish those degrees but you will go back to school too soon. Don't be too hard on yourself as a couple years after that you will have recovered enough to take and pass those classes. Your life isn't over with this diagnosis it is just going to be different. But it will be a better different without the pain and moodiness. Eventually your family will understand and stop the eyerolls because they will see you healing. It will be hard socially but your social life was always tough anyway.  The important thing is you will get your health back and that is more important than grabbing a quick meal at a take out joint. Hang in there.
    • I can understand doctors being cautious and wanting certainty before diagnosing a youngster with a lifelong condition that will limit their already limited dietary choices. Even so, his figures seem to make a very strong case and I wonder what their rationale is for waiting 3 months? That seems to be time that could be better spent getting him healthier on a gluten-free diet. I wonder if you can ask them what clinical advantages the delay will bring? Either it could speed the process along, or at least you'd get a better understanding of why they advocate a delay? 
    • He had the dpg igg as well. That came back at 50, normal is under 20.   It's the waiting that is hard and the reluctance of Drs to diagnose. His diabetes educator has already said they won't pay attention to those results for 3 months and then they'll test again. If they're still high they will look at the next steps. Gp seems a bit more ready to proceed now so hopefully he will get the referral sorted so we can have a definite answer before too long. 
    • You find a magic typewriter in an old musty box in the attic. It will allow you to write a message to yourself on the day that you found out you had celiac (or gluten sensitivity etc). You can include anything you've learned about yourself, handling celiac, good strategies for coping, how to deal with emotional issues, hostile reactions from friends and family, travel, work, dating. etc.  You may not include details of who won the World Series / next weeks lottery numbers etc as this would break the space time continuum and the typewriter will give you a nasty shock if you even try it, so just keep to the celiac insights.      
    • Thanks to everyone that's replied I plan to sort through these and bundle them up into a big ball of helpfulness.  For now, here's mine   'I wish more people were aware that a negative test for celiac doesn't equate to 'gluten is fine for you, eat as much as you want'. That may be the case and in which case tuck in, but for some people it won't be and they risk more illness and unnecessary suffering because the general understanding of NCGS and associated conditions is so poor.'
  • Upcoming Events