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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Sunbeam Breadmaker
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Hi there,

as I figured, my mother-in-law gave me a breadmachine christmas. I already read the manual and I also read the advices about breadmachines in the glouten gourmet book I got. And I have the strange feeling, I can't make good gluten-free breads with this machine. This sunbeam breadmachine kneads the dough two times and I heard this isn't that good with our dough. It also has expressbake settings, but it doesn't say, if this leaves one kneading process out or not. I read in previous postings, that the expressbake setting could leave one kneading process out. But is this so with every bread machine?

The next thing, that I read in the glutenfree cookbook was, that the paddle(s) should be large and NOT dough-hook-shaped. And it shouldn't be a short thick paddle and if so, the dough should be mixed outside the pan or use a rubber spatula to stir the dough as it is mixing. How large is large? And what is dough-hoo-shaped??? I think mine has a short thick paddle, but it's not possible to mix it outside or stir the dough, while it is mixing. This machine mixes on it's own and while it's mixing you can't open the lid, otherwise you have to start all over again.

I also can't cut out the "stir down" or the second rising. I need help!!!

Stef

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I read a lot b4 buying one recently and every expressbake-type option i saw was accomplished by skipping 2nd knead/rise.

So far i've made little mistakes 2 of the 3x i made bread, but it all turned out great.

My paddle is small and w/ a 30-40 degree angle in it, and watching it work (lil window) i can't see what could be done better w/ a different paddle.

Also both my mom and sister make good gluten-free bread w/ machines that are years old, and neither has single knead/rise settings. Maybe something w/ Bob's Red Mill gluten-free mix makes perfect optimization unnecessary ? Same mix for all of us.

Your book should have a chart of the times used for each diff program included. The ones i saw showed that the fastbake cycle always skipped 2nd knead/rise. ANd if it doesn't, u can get good bread w/ Bob's "wonderful gluten-free" mix, even w/ 2nd knead/rise.

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I often use the rapid setting on my machine with gives two kneading processes but only a short rest between the two. It works great with my favorite bread recipe. I also have used the quick setting with has only one kneading process (but a 5 min longer bake cycle...which is too long for my recipe) so generally I use the rapid setting. I've also unplugged my machine before the baking turns on in order to allow a new recipe to rise longer, then replug it in and set it to just the bake setting (starts baking right away.)

Take a look in the manual. Try a good gluten-free bread (like Bob's which is very forgiving.) If it flops, give a call to you MIL and ask if she would mind if you take it back to the store and replace it with another breadmachine type. I did this with two different brands before I found one I liked (but, like Tom said, you may find it works just fine for you. Mine isn't an uber expensive one with all the bells and whistles, just the Oster brand. Every time I try something new with it, I learn a little more about how to use it more efficiently for myself.) The stores (and the young clerks managing the counter) generally don't care why anyone returns things (especially big store like Target.)

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My husband totally surprised me with a new bread machine for Christmas (He is very understanding of me and this disease.) I have a gluten-free loaf baking as we speak so we'll see how it turns out. It is a Toastmaster TBR15. Everywhere he went looking for one, he was told by many salespersons they will not be carrying bread machines anymore because no one buys them. Hmmmm. Will let you know how it turns out. :ph34r:

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Bread turned out tasting great!!! My new machine made a smaller loaf than my old Toastmaster, but the bread is good and holds together. Sorry, though, the recipe I used has both eggs and yeast. :unsure:

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Hello everyone, I'm not sure if any of you have the answer, but if you could help me out with what I may have done wrong that would be great! I purchased a Breadman breadmaker, since it was a great sale price at Target, because I had read that many people make wonderful gluten free breads in the breadmakers, and mine in the oven have been flops. Anyhow, I used the super rapid rise cycle like I've read since it only kneads once. I did not however use the rapid rise yeast (maybe this was my problem?) My problem was, when it was the machine stopped baking because it was "done" the bread still looked like it needed another 30 minutes baking. I could not figure out how to set a time to continue baking, and looked in the manual and there is nothing saying how to continue baking if your bread isn't done. I'm getting so frustrated I'm about to give up on all of this and take the machine back! I set it for the correct size of loaf, but I don't know how just by not using rapid rise yeast, would cause the bread to not be even half done when its supppose to be...

Rachel

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Hi Rachel. I have a Breadman TR2200C model ("ultimate" is somewhere on the box in BIG letters) but i've only used it w/ a mix. Mine makes a big deal about having all ingred at room temp b4 starting, which i suppose could be more of an issue on a rapid cycle.

But i too don't know about the yeast or how it could be responsible.

Lastly, it'd be a shame to take the machine back w/out at least getting one tasty gluten-free loaf out. Bob's Red Mill makes a mix named "Wonderful gluten-free Bread" and they ain't lyin'.

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Hi Tom, I don't think mines the Ultimate one...but it did make a big deal about the ingredients being room temp. and they were, would that contribute to a way underdone loaf? I'll give there consumer services phone line a call tomarrow and ask if they have any suggestions...

Rachel

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Does your breadmaker have a "BAKE" setting? A couple times I had to unplug my machine and let the bread rise longer. Then I just set it to "BAKE" and it immediately starts baking. (I also accidentally hit the button once and it deflated my perfect loaf. I was so upset I ran upstairs ranting like a maniac :huh: so don't do that, it's embarrassing.)

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Mines the TR846, and it doesn't have a bake setting...would letting it rise longer have any effect on the bread still being dough when its suppose to be done?? Grrah I thought the bread machine was suppose to make things easier : (, I'm going to call the consumer service line tomarrow,and hopefully they can help me, maybe theres something I can do to set it so it bakes longer, I looked in the manual and there was nothing of that sort...

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