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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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i found thi sin another forum and thought you guys may like to read it too:

HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT

Spotlight Turns on Celiac Disease

By Katrina Woznicki - WeNews correspondent

(WOMENSENEWS)--Alice Bast was 29 back in 1990 and excited about becoming a mother for a second time.

During the pregnancy she suffered bouts of severe diarrhea, but her doctor said not to worry. The pregnancy went smoothly until two weeks before her due date when she felt the baby had stopped moving. She was soon in the hospital delivering a full-term stillborn girl. It wasn't until after several more miscarriages when she would learn that the whole nightmare could have been prevented if she had followed a gluten-free diet or a diet free of wheat, barley and rye.

The cure seemed so simple, but the disease experts call a "clinical chameleon" was complex. Bast suffered from an autoimmune disorder called celiac disease or celiac sprue. The condition occurs when the body attacks itself after the intestine is exposed to the protein gluten. This exposure can lead to a variety of symptoms both mild and traumatic, from indigestion to severe diarrhea to intrauterine growth retardation, which could affect babies born to untreated mothers, as it did in Bast's case. It also causes mal-absorption of other nutrients, such as iron and calcium, leaving patients, particularly women, vulnerable to other serious chronic conditions like osteoporosis and anemia.

Much is known about celiac disease, which affects twice as many women as men, yet public awareness about this condition is just beginning. All it takes is a simple blood test to diagnose it, but few people are aware of this and few doctors know what to look for to determine if the blood test is necessary. Thanks to more recent studies on the subject and more patients speaking out about it, celiac disease is falling under the national spotlight and what was once an uncommon, often misdiagnosed condition is now being studied for potential cures and even has grocery stores responding to accommodate people requiring gluten-free diets.

"Fourteen years ago my life was dramatically altered," said Bast, who, as a result of her experiences, founded the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness in December 2003. "I became a victim of this debilitating and widespread disease that has been virtually unknown. I had a full-term stillborn child, multiple miscarriages, and a premature child. I was losing weight. I was anemic. I had constant diarrhea. It took me five years and 22 physicians to discover I was suffering from celiac disease."

Widely Under-Diagnosed

One out of every 250 Americans has some level of gluten intolerance, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, a division of the National Institutes of Health. The condition goes widely under-diagnosed because many physicians don't know how to detect it and its ubiquitous symptoms are often mistaken for other illnesses, such as irritable bowel syndrome.

Everyone has tiny, fingerlike protrusions called villi that line the small intestine and help usher nutrients from food into the bloodstream. In celiac patients, however, gluten triggers a reaction that causes the immune system to attack these villi. When the villi are destroyed, celiac patients lack the ability to absorb critical nutrients.

Patients can be entirely asymptomatic or in more drastic cases, celiac can affect their fertility. There is no known treatment or cure for the condition except one that works 100 percent of the time: completely cutting gluten from the diet, which means cutting out popular carbohydrates, like pasta, bread, and cookies. When individuals with celiac stop eating gluten, the villi in the intestinal tract are able to grow back and function normally.

Of the 8 million Americans living with autoimmune illness, which include not only celiac disease, but also lupus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, more than three-fourths of those patients are women. Genetics play a role in all of these conditions and celiac is also believed to be a genetic disorder, but the biological mechanics remain unknown.

"The theory is that some genes on chromosome X (the female chromosome)

could be responsible," says Dr. Alessio Fasano, co-director of the University of Maryland's Center for Celiac Research in Baltimore. "Or chromosome Y (the male chromosome) might be protective, but nobody knows. Nothing has panned out."

Looking for a Cure

While some scientists hunt for a cause, others are looking for a cure. Fasano said scientists have pinpointed a molecule that plays an active role in celiac. "This molecule is out of control mch more than it should be and it makes the gut leaky," he explained. "It's very peculiar."

Fasano is hoping to create a drug that celiac patients could take shortly before eating and the medication would block this molecule from misbehaving. There is also interest in developing a vaccine against gluten, Fasano said, though that research is just getting underway.

Dr. Peter Green, director of the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University in New York, said there is immense growing interest in finding treatment alternatives to celiac. Following a gluten-free diet is not easy because gluten hides in so many foods, from soy sauce to soup, leaving patients with severely limited food choices, so there is a greater focus on developing new therapies. While more grocery store shelves are featuring gluten-free aisles and a wider array of celiac-friendly products, researchers are exploring another avenue of investigation; creating drugs that would contain enzymes to help celiac patients digest gluten.

"It's a bit like giving someone Lactaid for someone with lactose intolerance," Green explained.

Celiac has many drawbacks to it, but there might be an upside. Green said there's some evidence suggesting women with celiac might have some health benefits, including lower cholesterol, a reduced risk for heart disease and a lowered risk of breast cancer. These perceived links have yet to be studied. "These are just epidemiological observations," Green said.

As women wait for more advanced treatments, scientists continue to unearth more connections between celiac and other conditions. A recent study from Italy published in The American Journal of Gastroenterology found placing a small group of migraine patients on a gluten-free diet either reduced migraine frequency and intensity or wiped out migraines entirely. Why migraines and gluten in the diet could be linked is not yet known.

Despite these gains, Bast said there's still a long way to go. "Research on celiac disease is in its infancy," she said. "There are a few centers focusing on celiac and all are under-funded. Physicians, particularly those on the front line of seeing patients, must understand the need to treat celiac disease to reduce the time to get a correct diagnosis. And the public must become aware of the diverse group of symptoms that can make celiac masquerade as something else."

Katrina Woznicki is a freelance writer based in Edgewater, New Jersey.

For more information:

National Foundation for Celiac Awareness: -

http://www.celiacawareness.org/

University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research: -

http://www.celiaccenter.org/

The Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University: -

http://www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu/

i found it very interesting and plan on checking out these websites---deb

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Thanks for the article. Before being diagnosed, I miscarried (went through hard labor with no baby) and it took me 2 years before I was able to conceive again. Thank God, I had a healthy son that time and another one a year later.

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    • It seems like you really need a concrete or near concrete answer so I would say maybe you ought to get the gene testing. Then you can decide on the gluten challenge.   Thanks! I am convinced our dogs are there waiting for us. Meanwhile they are playing, running, laughing, barking & chasing. I have another favorite quote dealing with dogs: "If a dog will not come to you after having looked you in the face, you should go home & examine your conscience."  ~~~ Woodrow Wilson ~~~
    • I can't help thinking that all of this would be so much easier if the doctor I went to 10 years ago would have done testing for celiac, rather than tell me I probably should avoid gluten. He was looking to sell allergy shots and hormone treatment, he had nothing to gain from me being diagnosed celiac. I've been messing around ever since, sort-of-most-of the time being gluten free but never being strict about it. I really feel like three months of eating gluten would do my body a lot of permanent damage. I've got elevated liver enzymes for the third time since 2008 and no cause can be found which might be good, I guess. I wonder if it would be reasonable to do the HLA testing first, to decide if I really need to do the gluten challenge. If the biopsy is negative, that is. Squirmingitch, love your tag line about dogs in heaven. We lost the best dog ever last December. I sure hope all my dogs are there waiting for me!
    • Most (90%-95%) patients with celiac disease have 1 or 2 copies of HLA-DQ2 haplotype (see below), while the remainder have HLA-DQ8 haplotype. Rare exceptions to these associations have been occasionally seen. In 1 study of celiac disease, only 0.7% of patients with celiac disease lacked the HLA alleles mentioned above. Results are reported as permissive, nonpermissive, or equivocal gene pairs. From: http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/88906  
    • This is not quite as cut & dried as it sounds. Although rare, there are diagnosed celiacs who do not have either of those genes. Ravenwoodglass, who posted above, is one of those people. I think she has double DQ9 genes? Am I right Raven?  My point is, that getting the gene testing is not an absolute determination either way.
    • Why yes it is! jmg and myself are NCIS, I mean NCGS specialist/experts or is it NCGI people ourselves. posterboy,
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