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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Hershey Candy
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17 posts in this topic

I am a twelve year old boy and I have been diagnosed with Celiac disease. I was diagnosed only about a week ago, so I am still really new to the whole diet. So I am wondering if Hershey's Milk Chocolate Candy Bars are okay, because I bought a miniature candy bar package from Costco, and the ingredients say the miniatures have malt, which is a big no-no, but it doesn't have any separate ingredients for the milk chocolates, so I am wondering if they have malt in them or not. Ok Thanks! :blink:

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Hershey is not a reliable company. They will not disclose whether their products are gluten free due to propriety ingredient information from their suppliers. It more important to be loyal to their suppliers than the millions of people who buy their products.

Here is a list of companies who will clearly disclose all forms of gluten:

http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/in...donothidegluten

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I'm no longer a Hershey's customer due to their lack of consideration for people that cannot tolerate gluten, but their plain chocolate is gluten free--as long as it does not list natural flavors as an ingredient. I was recently told their plain chocolate bar, chocolate bar with almonds, chocolate chips, cocoa, and plain Hershey's kisses are gluten free. That's about it. If it has natural flavors you have to assume it is not gluten free.

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Thanks! And by the way if you do ever eat Hershey's again the Recess Peanut Butter cups are okay. Thanks again.

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Its really upsetting to me about Hershey's. I need chocolate that is not only gluten free but peanut and nut free.... does anyone have any ideas?

Susan

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Agreed, Hershey is not on my safe list anymore.

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I am a twelve year old boy and I have been diagnosed with Celiac disease. I was diagnosed only about a week ago, so I am still really new to the whole diet. So I am wondering if Hershey's Milk Chocolate Candy Bars are okay, because I bought a miniature candy bar package from Costco, and the ingredients say the miniatures have malt, which is a big no-no, but it doesn't have any separate ingredients for the milk chocolates, so I am wondering if they have malt in them or not. Ok Thanks! :blink:

I called Hersheys (in USA/Midwestern States) and was told that all Hersheys candies are made on the same lines as wheat and gluten products. Because of this, I feel it is not worth the risk to eat ANY Hersheys candy. Don't get discouraged, though! Kinnikinnick makes chocolate doughnuts. We have tried 3 flavors so far, and all have been awesome! I am sure there is a Celiac-safe delicious candy bar out there in the world somewhere. When I find it, I will let you know how and where to buy it. I will not give up---I promise!!!! B)

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Hershey's plain chocolate bars used to be considered safe. But there have been changes in their company. I don't know if they have changed what they are actually doing, or just what they tell people.

But, HERSHEY MINIATURES ARE DEFINITELY NOT SAFE.

I used to think the plain bars were OK, even though they are in a package with Krackle, which have barley malt in the crispies. But later I found out that when Hershey makes all the miniatures, little leftover pieces get remelted to make new bars, so even the "plain" chocolate miniatures are likely to have malt contamination.

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I am a twelve year old boy and I have been diagnosed with Celiac disease. I was diagnosed only about a week ago, so I am still really new to the whole diet. So I am wondering if Hershey's Milk Chocolate Candy Bars are okay, because I bought a miniature candy bar package from Costco, and the ingredients say the miniatures have malt, which is a big no-no, but it doesn't have any separate ingredients for the milk chocolates, so I am wondering if they have malt in them or not. Ok Thanks! :blink:

I'm sorry, this must be hard for you. Hershey's chocolate bars are something I have eaten every day of my life (I'm old enough to be your mom so thats a long time) and to not be able to eat them any more is hard for me. Something that I have used to replace the Hershey's bar is Guittard milk chocolate chips. They are creamy and taste pretty good. Its kind of silly but I feel like I am sneaking something by eating chocolate chips, I guess since they are used for baking and meant for eating out of hand. Plus they are easy to find in grocery stores.

Mars candies is pretty clear on their allergy information. IF there is an allergen in their candy they state it. I have been eating their candies when I want a candy bar, as long as it doesn't list wheat or gluten. Nestle is another company that if it doesn't have wheat on the label I feel ok eating it.

Guittard sales candy bars but I have noticed they can be difficult to find and they are kind of spendy compared to a Hershey's bar. The chocolate chips run about $2 for a bag while the candy bar is $3 to $4 depending on where you buy it.

I hope this helps.

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Its really upsetting to me about Hershey's. I need chocolate that is not only gluten free but peanut and nut free.... does anyone have any ideas?

Susan

When I did a google search for nut free chocolate a lot comes up but so many of the companies don't say anything about wheat. I think that is fairly irresponsible since they know the importance of allergy info you would think they would list all of them right off the bat.

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DOn't give up! Try another brand! My kids have lots of food allergies, along with celiac. There is a lot they can't eat. It s hard at first to read the labels and just get frustrated at what you can't have. If you are in Utah, try a good earth store and get the Enjoy Life Chocolate Chips, you can melt them and mold them or just get creative! there is also on online store called wheyoutchocolate.com Their chocolate is allergy safe and does not include milk, soy, nuts, peanuts, OR gluten. THe prices aren't too bad for the chocolate, but it can be pricey for shipping. Good Luck!

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Hang in there! You are going to feel so much better! I know it seems very overwhelming at first, but it really does get better. My son (he's 8 and was diagnosed right before Christmas last year) was just saying this morning how much he loved Bob's Red Mill Mighty Tasty Hot Cereal and that if we'd never found about him having Celiac he would never have known about it and that would be a bummer.

Here are some other things he really, really likes:

Gluten Free Sensations Chocolate Chip Cookies (order online from Gluten Free Sensations) - and he didn't like chocolate chip cookies before!

Kinnikinnick Chocolate Donuts

French Meadows Bakery frozen brownies with Breyer ice cream on top

Lara Bars - they come in lots of flavors. He loves some and hates others, so don't be afraid to try different ones.

Gorilla Munch cereal

Glutino Chocolate breakfast bars

Crunch and Munch Popcorn

Chin up! You can do this!!

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Hershey is not a reliable company. They will not disclose whether their products are gluten free due to propriety ingredient information from their suppliers. It more important to be loyal to their suppliers than the millions of people who buy their products.

Here is a list of companies who will clearly disclose all forms of gluten:

http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/in...donothidegluten

That's really upsetting. I just bought a bag of Jolly Rancher Fruit Chews because they looked safe, and now I'm wondering if they really are.

Sigh!

I really miss Starburst...does anyone know if they are safe?

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I am a twelve year old boy and I have been diagnosed with Celiac disease. I was diagnosed only about a week ago, so I am still really new to the whole diet. So I am wondering if Hershey's Milk Chocolate Candy Bars are okay, because I bought a miniature candy bar package from Costco, and the ingredients say the miniatures have malt, which is a big no-no, but it doesn't have any separate ingredients for the milk chocolates, so I am wondering if they have malt in them or not. Ok Thanks! :blink:

Hey you

M & Ms (plain) are supposedly safe. So are Nestles semisweet chocoalte chips. If you want a treat, see if you can find Dagoba organic chocolate bars. They are expensive but made in a gluten-free facility in Oregon.

Celiac doesn't really suck. Think of it as a great way to learn what food REALLY is. (Hint: is doesn't come highly processed with long lists of unpronouncable ingredients). I am happy for you that you have found out at a young age not to eat gluten. Many of us grew up back in the dark ages when nobody ever heard of gluten and we have paid a hefty price with ill health. You'll be okay.

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I dont really eat the candy but I do eat Hersheys special dark chocolate chips.

I eat them a lot and am sure Id have a reaction to them if they contained gluten.

They seem to be ok. Hope so anyway!

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I dont really eat the candy but I do eat Hersheys special dark chocolate chips.

I eat them a lot and am sure Id have a reaction to them if they contained gluten.

They seem to be ok. Hope so anyway!

I am sure that many of Hershey's products are, in fact, gluten free. The problem I have with Hershey is that they continue to have a higher level of relationship with their suppliers, rather than the customers who purchase and consume their products.

Is it truly THAT difficult the identify ingredients in "natural flavors", which Hershey refuses to do? They will NOT clarify any of their products with "natural flavors" as gluten free or not, nor will they disclose the ingredient listing, as they say "it's proprietary information". So, there is no way that any Celiac or gluten intolerant person could determine whether Hershey's products are safe or not safe to consume, other than by the risk of getting ill.

Sorry way to do business, in my opinion. I refuse to buy Hershey's products for that reason. I have alternatives that I can trust and respect.

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