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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

This Is Too Funny!
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9 posts in this topic

I called the airline the yesterday -- getting ready for a trip. After making the reservation, I needed to order my gluten-free meal. The guy on the phone told me that he would scan the list for that, and asked if while he looked, I would explain what gluten was. After I gave him a quick definition, he said, "Oh, here it is, and that makes more sense. I always thought it was "glutton-free," for people who were gluttons and ate too much." I couldn't stop laughing! Still chuckling today.

Patty

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yeah - isn't that too funy - us celiac people eating too much - i don't know about you all but ever since i've known i've had the "d" i don't over eat - unless i'm cheating(being bad) - that is w/ food - my family & i call it cheating - i don't care for alot of the gluten-free food - n don't have a lot of time to make "special" recipes so i eat eggs, sausage, egg & tuna salad - i did find a bread that i love toasted so ALL sandwiches must be toasted - anyway - yeah i very seldon over eat - thanks for sharing the story - that was cool!

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As a pastor I can point out that gluttony is a sin! So now that you have pointed this out maybe I can start to point out to others that "gluteny" is a sin :rolleyes: and must be stopped. After all, to "gluten" one of us is almost like murder! Isn't it? :P

Thanks for the laught though, I will have to remember this one.

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And now you two have me laughing even harder! :D No, I never overeat, and it's hard to anyway. I don't like the gluten-free alternative flours and breads, so gluttony is not only a sin, it's nearly impossible (except for potatoes -- a favorite!). And no, I don't cheat (eat gluten) -- I used to have a mild allergy to wheat, and so when I went gluten-free, I was no longer de-sensitizing myself to wheat with little bits here and there, so now if I eat even a crumb, I have a severe allergic reaction (anaphylactic shock). So not only is cheating NOT an option, I HAVE to be so careful, so I generally don't eat out and buy only "whole foods" (one ingredient in their natural state).

Oh, this is funny -- last time I was hospitalized with anaphylaxis, they brought in bread on my hospital tray the next morning! It's was in my diagnosis, and I also told the dietician. So of course when I asked the dietician to be sent to my room, she told me it wasn't wheat, but "whilte." (Is "white" a new grain? I used to teach in the wheat and corn fields of Kansas, but never a field of "white." :blink: Hmmmm . . . ) Anyway, there I am explaining to this dietician what wheat is! Argh! It scares me, thinking of little kids with food allergies, who just eat what is stuck in front of them. Another story.)

OK, tell me something funny too?

Patty, the absent-minded professor

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Oh, this is funny -- last time I was hospitalized with anaphylaxis, they brought in bread on my hospital tray the next morning! It's was in my diagnosis, and I also told the dietician. So of course when I asked the dietician to be sent to my room, she told me it wasn't wheat, but "whilte." (Is "white" a new grain? I used to teach in the wheat and corn fields of Kansas, but never a field of "white." Hmmmm . . . ) Anyway, there I am explaining to this dietician what wheat is! Argh! It scares me, thinking of little kids with food allergies, who just eat what is stuck in front of them. Another story.)

OK, tell me something funny too?

Yep--far too common. When I was first diagnosed my dad said something like, "Oh, you can eat raisin bran, right?" He got the impression that unless it was rye bread or frosted mini wheats, I could eat it :). He understands now, but we still make fun of that.

People have actually asked on the board if white bread is okay....on the last pages of messages, probably in the food products section--kinda funny, but scary--some people have life-threatening responses when they consume foods they're allergic to--the dieticians would be in trouble if someone in the hospital was that way with wheat. :lol:

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--kinda funny, but scary--some people have life-threatening responses when they consume foods they're allergic to--the dieticians would be in trouble if someone in the hospital was that way with wheat.

Yup, that was me -- in the hospital with a life-threatening allergy to wheat, and they bring me bread and crackers with my meals. I gave up trying to explain, called home for food, and my daughter brought me a couple of cans of pineapple. :D

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I was on a recent business trip and booked my airfare online. I selected the Gluten-Free Meal from the special needs drop-down menu and thought this is easy. I come to find out that my flights were changed in that "No Special Meal Offered" was printed on my receipt. I ended up having to pack a travel meal and carry it with me so that I could sustain myself while in-flight.

Lesson learned is that it's alsways good to double-check and have something gluten-free with you just in case.

Cleveland Bob :)

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That hospital dietician story about the white vs wheat was funny, but in all seriousness, if I were the hospital I'd check her credentials and demote her anway for that. She's a liability to the hospital.

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I'm inclined to agree about taking the hospital dietician to task. Geez... you're IN there for a severe reaction to wheat and they give you wheat?? What's the diff betw. that and giving someone with a life-treatening allergy a whopping dose of penicillin?? Someone would fry for that!!

That's sort of my nightmare... that I end up in a nursing home someday and people feed me wheat and I keep having "molten acid" leaking out of me and they get mad and I get terrible bed sores on my butt!! YIKES!!

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