• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Graduate School Reasearch In Education
0

13 posts in this topic

Hi All-

New to the site. I'm a Silly Yak (yahoo member). I'm 36, a celiac (dx 0ct 03) and have 4 kids, two with celiac disease.

I'm a teacher who is in grad school and am gathering my own research on celiac disease and school.

Q: How does the gluten free diet effect children's feelings about school? (But from the kids perspective--not the parents!!)

I'll be posting questions, and looking for kids to keep a "feeling" log during school in the near future--but I'm looking to see if people will be willing to help. I'll take all ages, including college.

Has anyone seen research focused on school from the kids perspective? I've been searching and have yet to find a close link. e-celiacs.org has an art on celiac disease in kids--but not hard facts stuff.

Thanks in advance for anyone willing to help. When the time comes, a letter from my school advisory board will be included--just saying that I'm for real. :)

Heather

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


That is really interesting to think about. How did you come up with this topic? Is it from your own chidren since 2 have Celiacs and two don't?

I would think the answers would really vary depending on when the child was diagnosed. I was diagnosed my senior year of High School (and am now a sophmore in college) and am sure that the feelings I feel about school and Celiacs are very different from those of someone diagnosed when they were a baby or very young. When younger kids get diagnosed I am so happy because they won't remember how life was when they ate gluten (taste and pain -wise) as much as adults do.

I am sure you will find people willing to help you. Good luck!

Kristina

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your response!

The topic is close to home--obviously. I want to share celiac disease with teachers in the field, and this will do it (my class will know more!). Also, as a parent who is celiac disease and who has celiac disease I go through different problem solving techniques when thinking out being out of the house for long periods (like when a meal will be eaten). To take care of myslef, I don't stress so much. I know I can always eat a baked potato or dry salad (yum, I know--but I won't pass out). With the kids, (mine are young, 4 and 6 w/celiac disease) it consumes my thoughts because they depend on me to take care of it while we are out. And, they are not going to eat a salad or bp!!

I also feel, as a parent, one of my main responsibilties is to feed my kids (you know, the basics: food, clothing shelter). Simple! I think about gluten free all the time when they are out of the house. I want to now how much are they really thinking about it.

I've been thinking about homeschooling my kids too. I want them to love learning and I want to see if celiac disease is taking fun out of learning because school and gluten-free are not always easy.

Thanks for your time,

Heather

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree--the opinions are going to vary. For myself, though: I've always liked school, always tried extremely hard and been the top of my class...basically no problems or aversion to education here :lol: . I don't think the celiac necessarily affects a person's perspective on school, but you might feel a little left out.....(w/ food and all)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always liked school too. I loved high school and now I love college. Not even the gluten-free diet changed it. :D I'm sure answers will very though

Good luck with research :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I think they will vary--but I think it will be interesting/helpful to see the factors that contribute. I might find something that can help parents and kids who are having a difficult time! :)

Heather

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Heather,

There is a book, available on this site and amazon I think, called "personal stories on celiac disease" or something. It is 3 page stories by all sorts of people on how they got diagnosed and their reactions and whatnot. There is a chapter written by people diagnosed as kids, and another chapter written by people diagnosed as teenagers. Very different stories in the two chapters. You may want to check it out.

Merika

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the book the previous poster is refering to is entitled, "A Personal Touch On... Celiac Disease (The #1 Misdiagnosed Intestinal Disorder),"

by Berlin, Stone.

Best wishes with your research,

Gina

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Several of us that post on this board are in that book (just a side note).

-Jessica :rolleyes:

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ahh--yes-I know the book. I wanted to write my "story" but was slow moving to do so. :(

Thanks!

Great advice!!!!

Heather

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi All--I meet (again) with my professor after class and he says it is a no-going with my cliac research. He thinks there is not enough there to "learn" from the project. He thinks I could write it without research. Hmm--maybe some of it...

Thank you to all who said they'd help!

Heather

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Heather, I was so excited about your research project till I got to the last post about your professor not supporting it!! I'm wondering if you are in the psych dept. or med school or what. I guess that would change how appropriate the research would be. Despite his/her response I think its really cool that you are channeling your energy and thoughts on celiac into what you may be able to study. Maybe you could just re-package it a bit for the professor. Could widening the topic a bit to include other health issues be to your advantage? Like maybe comparing the effects of several different health issues which change specific ways that kids are able to function in the school situation. Maybe a hypothesis that deals asks how health issues affect a childs self concept, and assesses how much support or lack of support they need to compensate for that. A lot of that seems to be uncharted territory in the research area. From what I can tell there really isn't much of a format for educators to rely on in helping students cope with these types of health issues. Lots of strategies and laws now cover various learning disabiliites, but the health issues can also impair kids learning situations because of the additional pressure it puts on them. I can tell by your enthusiasm on is that you really have something to offer with this type of work even if this doesn't turn out to be the place. Good luck, and keep up your creative thinking. Dreamhouses

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gluten-Free + School = No Fun

I'm Holly [Age 13] and I don't really like being gluten-free at school. I get frustrated when they see other people eating gluten. I'm not saying I would cheat. But every single day I think, 'What if I just took one little bite of that pizza' or 'Maybe just a taste of that breaded chicken'. But I know I can't and I know the result. Not good. But you know- there are some people who try to hide their food so it doesn't make me feel bad; some who don't care what I think; some who don't know I have Celiac; and some who rub it in your face. None of the above are good. Sometimes I wish I never I had Celiac.

One of the science teachers in my school does have Celiac. I've talked to him but its not really any help because he says he cheats all the time. And thats obviously not good. He is the only other person I have talked to face to face who has it and he said he was diagnosed when he was about 40. No help.

In my opinion- I hate being gluten-free around other people. (Except my family)

And I am getting pretty tired of answering "Celiac Disease? Whats that?" or "Eww you have a disease. Get away"

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,436
    • Total Posts
      930,560
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      63,867
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    vprovenzatn
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Celiac disease is associated with numerous chronic conditions, such as anemia and malabsorption of some critical vitamins. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract, rates of gastric emptying, and gastric pH are responsible for impaired vitamin and mineral absorption. Intestinal CYP3A4 levels may also be disrupted, which may have implications in first-pass metabolism for some drugs that are substrates for this drug metabolizing enzyme. View the full article
    • Thank you for posting this I've never been to South America, it's the only continent, bar the poles, I've yet to visit. It's really nice to read that my gluten sensitivity hasn't ruled it out. Maybe I'll get to the land of Luis Suarez yet!
    • I know this post is a year ago... however it is still on the first page of the travel section!  I am from Uruguay, (South America) and I can answer this question for people that may look at it in the future. As a South American -  I can say that the cuisine varies greatly.  In cities, you shouldn't have any more than the normal amount of difficulty finding food.  For example, in Montevideo, the city I am from, you'll have no problem finding dedicated entire Celiac stores.  Meat is a large part of restaurant menus, so parilladas (similar in theory to steakhouses, would be very easy to navigate).  Uruguayans do eat a lot of pastries, and just like in the states... Most mainstream bakeries are not gluten free, but like I mentioned there are places that specialize.  In Uruguay, there is knowledge of Celiac and a large health awareness.  Some of the foods can be costly, cost of living in general is not low. In large swaths of South America, the foods you mentioned - Potatoes, rice, meat, etc are abundant, as are fresh fruits and veggies.  Avoiding corn does make it tricky.  Peru can be a great place for non-gluten eaters. Peru uses very little gluten (they are the original quinoa eaters) but there is a lot of corn in the diet (and since you are corn sensitive, that would be a food you would need to navigate). Latin America spread over two continents! In this area you will find a great variety in cultures, cuisines, and knowledge of celiac.  There is no reason why If you want to experience Latin America, that you have to rule out an entire region of the world because of Celiac.  Navigating it will be different, but it is doable!
    • Recently diagnosed last week does the pain ever get better??
    • George, i am sorry that you are not feeling well!  ☹️  I am not a doctor, but just trying out drugs to stop your symptoms just seems like a band aid  approach.  It sounds like he suspects IBS which is really, in my opinion, "I be stumped".  Has inflammatory bowel disorder (IBD) (more lovely autoimmune disorders) been ruled out?  This includes both Crohn's and Colitis.  My niece was diagnosed with Crohn's finally with a pill camera after all other tests were given.  The damage was not within reach of any scope.  I am just throwing out suggestions.  Hopefully, you and your doctor will figure it out soon!  
  • Upcoming Events