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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
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York Food Allergy Tests
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11 posts in this topic

:ph34r: I received the test back and am allergic to almost everything (in addition to being Celiac with severe intestinal damage) - Rice, corn, eggs, nuts, milk, soy, etc. I also have gastroparesis (trouble with food moving from stomach to intestine - especially fiber & fats). I am at a loss about what I should eat anymore. Are these tests really accurate? If so what am I supposed to do - live on a feeding tube? This is getting ridiculous.
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Did it say how sensitive you are to these things? I know I am sensitive to dairy if I have alot of it but I can have some in moderation. Also I would value what these tests have to say...I for one did not have one done yet but plan to sometime in the near future.

Fruits and veggies are good though :D

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As vote said, how allergic? You may be able to include them in your diet rotationally (have them one day, but not the next few) which could help your options. You'll also want to investigate the widest possible variety of food. (Other grains, other fruits/vegetables, etc.) What's the full list?

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I had that test done about a month ago and also have LOTS of food allergies. I didn't need the York test tell me that I was reacting to food but it did help to pinpoint or at least validate my intolerances. It IS very hard but you will figure out what you can and cannot eat. I was working with a dietician when I was first told about the gluten intolerance and she had me eating sooooooooo many new and different foods that I was reacting almost daily. Then it made sense to me why I was not eating the foods that she put in my diet......I probably reacted to them before and avoided eating them subconsciously. Most fruits, fresh meats, fish and salads are ok. Nothing canned or processed. Think natural.....but eliminate the things that make you ill. If you tested positive and are not sure if you get sick from it try small doses to see how you react.

It's been 3 months since going gluten free and I am still having a hard time with other intolerances. This morning I reacted to hot brown rice cereal and remembered that I felt the same way when I had buckwheat, which I tested positive for, coincidentally made by the same manufacturer. So....it could be cross contamination. This is a learning experience. I'll never eat that hot cereal again....or any other made by that manufacturer! Of course it ruined my day and I am still feeling awful but what is the other option....Not eating???? You have to figure out what doesn't hurt you so that you can eat and maintain nutrition.

I don't do eggs or soy or peanuts anymore....just to name a few.

One of the good things that came out of my appointments with my dietician is that she had me keep a food diary. Everything I put in my mouth was documented along with the time and how I felt afterwards. When you don't feel well it's hard to figure out what did it but if you see it in black and white over and over then you know you can't have it. Consider keeping a food diary.

Email me anytime if you need to talk.

good luck!

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Here is what the CDers in my family had to do.

Start with some simple meat such as chicken that you do not react to. Grill it without extra spices or sauces. Use only a little salt for flavoring and some garlic if you do not react. Be sure you are starting with a clean grill if you used to use it for non-gluten-free items or the cross-contamination can get you.

Next, buy some white rice (or brown if you are like me and a nutrition nut or get constipation badly). Use that as your starch to start with since it is rare to have a reaction to rice.

Pick out a couple veggies and fruits that you like and are not reactive to. Keep it minimal and simple.

Use this simple meal for several days rotating among the couple of fruits for breakfast and snacks and among the couple of veggies for your other meals.

After a week or so and you are not reacting, add in foods like you do a baby learning to eat...one at a time. Keep a food diary. Only add one fruit or one veggie and eat it once daily for several days. If you react, go back to what you were eating before and let it get out of your system. If you don't react, put this food into your rotation.

When you have a little variety in your fruits and veggies, add some potatoes instead of rice. We did mashed potatoes made with gluten-free chicken broth instead of dairy. Now you have two starches you can alternate along with your veggies and fruits so you shouldn't be having to eat the same thing more than two or three times a week.

Next add a different meat. Again, keep it simple and grilled. No added fats, fancy spices, or sauces.

You get the picture. After several weeks, you will find that you have quite a bit of variety and are letting your body relax and heal. After a couple of months more, you will have significant variety and a clear list of what you react to.

After you have been six months or more without a reaction, try adding back an item you were only a little reactive to and see if your immune system will handle it now. We found that we were able to add back almost everything within a yr or two. We each still have a couple of things we don't dare try again, but we are a whole lot better off than before.

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Donna,

I'm reading the advice that you gave linda...I'm going to have to take it myself.

I am having such a hard time with food. I eat things that I think are ok but then react terribly. The advise you gave to keep it simple is what I have to do. The thing is that I thought I WAS keeping it simple! Chicken seems to be ok......white rice is now bothering me too! My gut is always inflamed and bloated. Even certain veggies are doing me in. I have been trying to be gluten free for about 3 months now but have realized there are so many other intolerances and then the IBS acts up too! OKay, so i have to get back to basics and simple food. It seems that the less variety of food the better off I . One thing sets me off and then my gut is irritated for days!

soooooooooooo here I go again..think simple.........and gotta watch those veggies!

Will think of your words whenever I dare to venture onto something that is questionable! "Simple"!!!

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Good advise Donna, I agree with Mel... Keep it simple. Like you Mel, I react to so many things...My IBS, after being great for many months started up again, so I too have had to go back to the tried and true....a few days of mostly rice or rice products, then I know I can safely add puffed millet, puffed corn...and when the pains/bloating/gas goes away I add simple things back in, plain potatoes, peas, carrots, a LF white fish...but only salt as my seasoning.

I still don't know who to go to for the food allergy test...I want to be tested for as many as possible although like some of you I can already tell what I'm sensitive to. Dairy for sure and soy for sure and to many raw fruits or veggies, and then there is chocolate...oh don't even start me on that..I'm a chocoholic but it sure can do me in. I know in part because of the fats. I can do a cocoa based smoothie with no problems.

Anyway you look at it, it's tough. But something challenging always is, and after all, aren't we worth it?

Kandee

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lindasheppard -

You are not alone! And I felt pretty much the way you do now, when I found out that I had celiac disease.

I am allergic to most proteins and lots of fruits and veggies too.

I had to eliminate them from my diet. The only thing I can tolerate is a (very) small amount of corn, which is fortunate because similar to gluten, corn is in everything, including tylenol and ibuprofen. Once your system has calmed down it should be able to tolerate more fresh fruit and vegetables though stay away from things in the cabbage family if you're having fiber issues. While I can eat rice, I have found that I like quinoa better and it has more protein, haven't had a reaction to it either. It can be purchased as natual, flakes and flour. Due to my allergies I eat organic, and I pretty much stay away from mainstream and processed foods. It has taken me a long time to figure out what I can/cannot eat, so don't get too frustrated. I'd be happy to help you with any food suggestions - just let me know..

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aaascr,

i read your post and found it interesting that I used to eat quinoa too and I don't think it gave me a reaction. Then I started seeing a nutrionist who wanted me to have a little protein at every meal. I would have 2 hard boiled egss with the quinoa for lunch. That's when the trouble really started. I would get soooo sick. Not knowing I had food allergies other than gluten I figured there was something up with the quinoa so I stopeed eating it. Then I had the YORK allergy test done and eggs were at the top of the list for allergies...both the white and the yolk. I have never attempted to try the quinoa again as I am afraid. Could there be any cross contamination with quinoa? Not sure. My gut has been in a bad sate for weeks and I can't seem to get it to calm down. I guess I have to scrutinize more and definately stop the espresso that I love so much! it is starting to irritate me regardless of how little of it I drink right now. maybe..........when my gut is better I can sneak in a few sips from hubby's cup! Between the IBS and the allergies this is really tough. I am happy that you finally figured out what you can and cannot eat. I am still trying to get it right. Please pass along any tips that you might have. Even after I have a BM the pain and twisting are there....sometimes I even get bloated! oh well...............................

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I have a different take on the York testing.

My husband is celiac & we did the full test and it came back that he was highly sensitive to soy, yeast, almond, milk, egg yolk, certain nuts like hazelnut, cashew, lentils, chili pepper and mildly sensitive to other items such as garlic & brazil nuts.

We showed the report to his gastro, who is the ONLY gastro who diagnosed him with celiac disease properly in 30 years, he was not familiar with this type of testing, but he said not to put too much faith in it as we could run another test in several months and get differing results, as the body does change.

Why I am skeptical about this test: For example, my husband has not eaten lentils or chili pepper in 30 years! nor hazelnuts or cashews in 30 years; not even in a baked item or processed item as nuts upset his IBS (that he thought he had). Anyway, my question to York was how can someone have an antibody in their blood for a foodstuff that they have not eaten in 30 years? Their reply is that it has to be in something he has eaten recently, maybe as a hidden ingredient. Well, sorry, but that's not possible. From 11/03 to the test date of 8/04 everything he ate was made by me or him from scratch with plain/bland gluten-free ingredients. I am not questionning sensitivity to the soy, yeast, milk or egg yolk, admittedly, he does eat this stuff, but I am questionning the items he hasn't eaten for many, many years. How does the body have a measurable sensitivity to something that the person is not eating?

Anyway, I'd say "proceed at your own risk" and buyer beware. If you get a test, go over it with your GP, gastro or nutritionist (as a matter of fact, the York report tells you to do just that).

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I think they are good to have done however they are not widely accepted by the medical community yet.

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