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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

Isn't Baking Soda And Powder Gluten Free?
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Most of it isn't labelled because it does not contain wheat. I have seen it once reported something like this - food starch ( wheat). Or wheat food starch.

I have never seen it labeled as that  and most companies I have called, who labeled it as Modified Food Starch, use wheat starch and it is labeled Modified food starch. I have seen however modified corn starch or modified food starch (made from corn)  so I avoid all ones that just say modified food starch because I have found most of it is made from wheat starch.

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While not unheard of, wheat as the origin of "modified food starch" is extremely rare, at least in North America. It is almost always tapioca or corn starch. In Canada, disclosure of wheat is required by law in all foods. In the US, most foods are regulated by the FDA and FALCPA applies.

If you have a verifiable source of wheat being used, but not disclosed, provide it here and now. Be specific, that is, tell us the name of the product, and the source of your claim that it contains wheat. Otherwise, stop the fear mongering.

Modified food starch is a safe ingredient.

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I want to publically apologize. I haven't read a Campbell's soup label in a long time since I can't have Campbells soup so I was unaware that they have now listed their modified food starch as modified food starch, wheat.  So I apologize if my comments sent anyone in a state of fear and I will check my facts from now on before I post

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Thank you, that is appreciated :)

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All grains have glutens in them - not just wheat which has a particular type of gluten (gliadin) - it's just that wheat is particularly troublesome for people with gluten intolerances.

 

However, my understanding is that after wheat, corn gluten is the next biggest problem for many people with gluten sensitivities, especially if you have poor digestion or leaky gut syndrome. In fact, many people with gluten allergies, intolerance or celiac continue to have problems after they remove all wheat from their diets - and it's possible for some that it's because of corn gluten. I personally react as strongly to corn as I do to wheat (perhaps more so). As a result, I seek out gluten-free baking powder which does not have cornstarch in it. Baking soda (as stated previously) does not have either wheat or corn gluten. 

 

So, there is in fact a reason for gluten-free baking powder. 

 

Cheers, 

Dee

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All grains have glutens in them - not just wheat which has a particular type of gluten (gliadin) - it's just that wheat is particularly troublesome for people with gluten intolerances.

 

However, my understanding is that after wheat, corn gluten is the next biggest problem for many people with gluten sensitivities, especially if you have poor digestion or leaky gut syndrome. In fact, many people with gluten allergies, intolerance or celiac continue to have problems after they remove all wheat from their diets - and it's possible for some that it's because of corn gluten. I personally react as strongly to corn as I do to wheat (perhaps more so). As a result, I seek out gluten-free baking powder which does not have cornstarch in it. Baking soda (as stated previously) does not have either wheat or corn gluten. 

 

So, there is in fact a reason for gluten-free baking powder. 

 

Cheers, 

Dee

The "Gluten free" on a baking powder label has nothing to do with corn. It could still have corn starch. For labeling purposes and Celiac Disease - corn " gluten" is not called gluten.

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