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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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Hello My name is Dawn

I am a 30yo mother of two young girls and a nurse

In 2005 I had a total colectomy and my entire colon was removed.

Since that time I have had some huge weight loss and weight gain periods

Right now I am in the middle of a weight gain

I can do nothing to lose any weight

I go to the gym and exercise

In the mean time i was diagnosed with fibromyalgia and started taking lyrica

I went to the Dr last week due to stomach upset after eating everytime, fatigue, weight gain, pain and headaches

He diagnosed me with celiac and took some blood test.

He told me to start on a gluten free diet

Ok there is my problem

I am in school for my advanced nursing degree and am raising my girls

I wake up in the morning to poptarts and cereal, in the afternoon a tuna sandwich and the dinner with the family full of gluten

So I have no idea what to do

Any help will do

Dawn

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First Dawn....Welcome. :)

Secondly, how did he Dx Celiac without the results of the blood tests. And here is the thing, if the blood comes back POS he will want you to get a biopsy. You MUST keep eating gluten until ALL testing is done. He may not require a biopsy for a Dx, but you should at least wait until the blood work comes in. If it is POS and he doesnt want a biopsy, start your gluten-free diet then. If it comes back POS and he does want a biopsy, wait till the day after the biopsy to start gluten-free.

If ALL comes back NEG, you can still try the diet to see if you get results. Many in here came back NEG on tests but had a dramatic POS response to the diet (me included).

So right now, hang tight and read through these forums and LEARN LEARN LEARN. There are MANY threads that have menu ideas for children and adults. And you can ask specific questions ANYTIME.

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hi Dawn and welcome to our world!! this board is a great resource. read what you can and ask lots of questions...i'm sure you'll get some wonderful advise.

i'm curious about the doctor your saw...many doctors won't diagnose celiac without first performing a biopsy and certainly not before the blood work results come back...you'll need to continue consuming gluten until all tests are done or they won't be accurate.

but once you go gluten-free...

personally, i found it helpful to read about the disease. Celiac Disease - A Hidden Epidemic by Dr. Peter Green is a great starter book. i read it when i was awaiting my biopsy and found it very helpful. i also have Living Gluten-Free for Dummies. it's your typical Dummies book but worth checking out.

as for eating gluten-free...it's a lifestyle change. i've found it best to plan my week on Sundays. i do my shopping and spend some time cooking ahead of time so it's easier to re-heat and throw together meals if i'm too busy.

Rice Chex is now gluten-free so you can enjoy that for breakfast with some fruit, you can convert your tuna sandwiches to tuna wraps using corn tortillas and then get creative with dinners! you can also consider converting your household to gluten-free that way you don't have to make separate meals for yourself and your girls. (it's healthier anyway so no harm done!)

i'm in love with my crockpot these days, thanks to the "CrockPot Lady"...check out her website: http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/

you may want to stick to naturally gluten-free foods for a while until your body heals. shop the perimeter of the grocery store and steer clear of gluten-free breads and such for a while. some people also have issues with dairy and/or soy after going gluten-free.

it's daunting and scary at first but i promise, it will get easier!

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Hi Dawn,

Not to worry, once you get the hang of it - the gluten-free lifestyle becomes second nature.

Here are some quick breakfast ideas: Cereal (Rice Chex is my fav - Cocoa/Fruity Pebbles are great for a sugar fix), PB&J on rice cakes, hard boiled eggs and cheese slices, Trader Joe's frozen gluten-free banana waffles or rice pancakes (they also have a mix for both), BumbleBars (I like chocolate and almond chai), apple slices and peanut butter, Trader Joes organic yogurts, egg-cheese-salsa breakfast wraps in corn tortillas. I don't know where you live but, there are some very good markets when it comes to gluten-free: Sprouts, Trader Joe's, Henry's, Wild Oats, Whole Foods (most have gluten-free shopping lists online).

As mentioned by another poster, check out the blog for the gal that does gluten-free crockpot recipes that are pretty simple and tasty: http://crockpot365.blogspot.com/

Things always seem dismal after being newly diagnosed, don't worry, things will get better :)

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Welcome. The gluten-free diet may require some adjustment in lifestyle but any investment you make in it is an important investment in your health. This is a disease that is very manageable and we don't have to take meds and put up with their side effects! Planning and preparing ahead helps. We can still have(our versions of) pasta, bread, cereal and many of the familiar things. Switching family meals over to simple, natural foods and having everyone eat these naturally gluten-free foods is a good idea. You will learn how to prepare many of your old family recipes again, with gluten-free ingredients without sacfificing flavor. Enlist the help of your kids with kitchen chores if they are old enough and train in steps if they are not quite. It is not a burden to them, it is a good opportunity to teach important life skills and the investment of a little extra time and patience initially will pay off in the long run!

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Join a local Celiac support group.

Ask your doctor for a referral to a dietitian who is experienced with Celiac.

Learn how to read food labels and which companies make reading labels easier.

http://www.celiac.com/categories/Safe-Glut...3B-Ingredients/

http://www.glutenfreeinsd.com/product_updates.html and http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/foodlists/index.htm

Newly diagnosed: http://www.glutenfreeindy.com/diagnosis/newlydiagnosed.htm

Read, read, read.

other good resources besides this forum and its owner, celiac.com:

www.celiacdiseasecenter.columbia.edu

www.celiaccentral.org

www.celiac.org

www.celiacdisease.net

www.gluten.net

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    • Yes you are correct. Interestingly my genes in the US are thought to be more associated with RA. Which is something they thought I had prediagnosis. In the Middle and far East they are more likely to be associated with celiac and they are rare genes in Caucasians which I am according to my parents known heritage. I always caution folks not to take the gene tests as absolute proof they can't have celiac because I had one child who had positive blood and biopsy, did well on the diet, then got genes tested in young adulthood and was told they could never be celiac. Of course that resulted in her abandoning the diet. I worry but hope someday doctors will realise we still have a lot to learn about the genetics of this disease. PS While I still have some deformity in my hands my joint pain resolved after a few months on the diet.
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    • I can't help thinking that all of this would be so much easier if the doctor I went to 10 years ago would have done testing for celiac, rather than tell me I probably should avoid gluten. He was looking to sell allergy shots and hormone treatment, he had nothing to gain from me being diagnosed celiac. I've been messing around ever since, sort-of-most-of the time being gluten free but never being strict about it. I really feel like three months of eating gluten would do my body a lot of permanent damage. I've got elevated liver enzymes for the third time since 2008 and no cause can be found which might be good, I guess. I wonder if it would be reasonable to do the HLA testing first, to decide if I really need to do the gluten challenge. If the biopsy is negative, that is. Squirmingitch, love your tag line about dogs in heaven. We lost the best dog ever last December. I sure hope all my dogs are there waiting for me!
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