• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
0
ABQturkey

Low-level Allergy To Milk

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I'm going to post this in more than one forum because I need as many answers as I can get. My 6yo daughter was diagnosed w/celiac in mid-July and we've been doing the gluten-free thing since then. Her behavior has gotten worse since then and she still has stomach-aches, so the doctor ran an allergy panel and the only thing that came back elevated was milk. It was a low-level reading (0.63H - low level is between 0.35-0.70). Her regular pediatrician is out on medical leave so I was left with many questions. She's been drinking Lactaid and taking the Lactaid pills before she eats cheese and such. Are we supposed to stop all milk - even Lactaid milk? Does this encompass all dairy foods or just milk? I'm not sure what we should be avoiding and what's ok at this level. Please help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Welcome,

I would revisit her gluten free diet. Have you checked your used toaster, wooden cutting boards and spoons, lotions, shampoo, meds, vitamins or any contact she may have with her mouth.

Contamination at school is very difficult to avoid, with personal contact with food and other children. Are her school supplies safe. Play Doh is not. Have you met with her teachers and discussed her diet?

It's so difficult with children, especially when they are out of our watchful eyes during the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know about the allergy testing, but if your daughter is allergic to casein (milk protein) instead of lactose (milk sugar) you should eliminate all dairy products from her diet... milk, cheese, and whey are the big ones. Taking Lactaid doesn't help. Anything marked Kosher "pareve" is fine as long as it's also gluten-free. I'm leery of cheese substitutes (soy, rice) because I'm kind of a cheese snob :P (I grew up in Wisconsin), but soy milk and almond milk are good on cereal. Soy yogurt is good too. Rice milk... except for Rice Dream... is also fine, but I don't like the taste as much.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

butter is out too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is really low (Class 1) It's lower than what my son's was and we were told we didn't have to do anything. However, I'm not your doctor so you should check with them. In the meantime, here is a website that gives a little more info so you can see just how low it is . . .

http://www.oregonallergy.com/id17.html

My son was a Class 2 and the nurse said sometimes what they want (for the low level allergies) is for any type of "milk" ingredient to be at least third or fourth on the list of a product . . . but like I've said, our doc gave us no restrictions.

Also, like Momma Goose said . . . I'd take another look around for inadvertant gluten consumption.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Lactaid won't eliminate the casein and that's what she's allergic to. Yes, eliminate it. Be sure to watch for things like canned soups, margarine, canned icing, etc. Lots of things contain dairy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm going to post this in more than one forum because I need as many answers as I can get. My 6yo daughter was diagnosed w/celiac in mid-July and we've been doing the gluten-free thing since then. Her behavior has gotten worse since then and she still has stomach-aches, so the doctor ran an allergy panel and the only thing that came back elevated was milk. It was a low-level reading (0.63H - low level is between 0.35-0.70). Her regular pediatrician is out on medical leave so I was left with many questions. She's been drinking Lactaid and taking the Lactaid pills before she eats cheese and such. Are we supposed to stop all milk - even Lactaid milk? Does this encompass all dairy foods or just milk? I'm not sure what we should be avoiding and what's ok at this level. Please help!

I would do a two week elimination on all milk products to see if it helps. Milk products are the catalyst to really bad behavour in our family. We prefer homemade almond milk as a replacement and we make a vegan cheese with cashews and nutritional yeast that is extremely yummy. Is she getting enough fiber. Store bought gluten free stuff and mixes are all practically fiberless. Adding veggies and ground flax seeds to muffins is a nice and tasty fiber boost. I add ground gluten free oats to all of my baking, peanut butter oatmeal cookies are especially popular. Organic coconut oil works especially well as a butter replacement and is a very healthy addition to a celiac's diet because of the higher risk of thyroid issues.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,911
    • Total Posts
      943,455
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      67,049
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    lsmh5173
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Update: I have tried calling the company several times and have emailed twice. I have yet to talk to a person on the phone and no one has emailed me back.    I did a little research and they were are already involved with a class action lawsuit about being labeled as salt free and one of the first ingredients is sodium chloride.  I am done with this shampoo because this whole company seems a little shady now! 
    • I've actually been glutened by shampoo with hydrolyzed wheat protein, and I wasn't even the one using it. It was my husbands! I swear I don't go around eating my husbands hair.  I am pretty sensitive though, so it's entirely believable that the trace amounts in his hair were getting onto his and my hands and then making its way to my mouth, etc. etc.  It was a slow and steady low grade glutening that eventually built up to something that I was able to recognize as more definitively "a glutening". Once we ditched the shampoo and I recovered, I realized that I'd been feeling it for weeks.  It's going to depend on your level of sensitivity, but even if you don't feel it, it could still be doing damage. Also... I second that. Starch is a carbohydrate, protein is a protein (obviously), there is no simple process that would convert one into the other. Also, as gluten is a protein, converting starch to protein wouldn't be expected to do anything to gluten ANYWAY.  Speaking as a biologist here. I call poppycock. 
    • I just want you to remind you that I just had a repeat endoscopy last week after my diagnosis some five years ago.   Even though my antibodies are still elevated, my intestinal tract has healed.  But why have I been feeling sick?  I have chronic gastritis.  Who would have guessed?   I do not drink (rarely), take any meds other than my thyroid replacement, and do not have H. Pylori.  That leave autoimmune as the most likely culprit.  I also have some other minor issues that I think is related to Hashimoto’s.  So, I am in an autoimmune flare-up, but celiac disease is not the cause of current my woes. My endoscopy results have validated that I have been doing a good job about avoiding gluten.  I can relax a bit now!   I think because the treatment for celiac disease is a burden placed on us, it can become overwhelming.  Sure, we all eventually master the diet and most of us go on to lead plain old normal lives, but if something is off, celiac disease is the first thing that many of us blame.  Actually, we blame ourselves, to be honest.  We have to remember that we are often dealing with other health issues too.   As far as hair, I buy gluten free shampoo.  It is from Costco and it says it right on the label.  Nice and inexpensive.   Do I really need it to be gluten free?  No.  I think the last time I swallowed shampoo, my mother was most likely bathing me and I did not heed her warning to keep my mouth shut (baby shampoo may not sting your eyes but it tastes awful!).   Like you, sometimes I think it helps to have one less thing to think about and that can be priceless.           
    • https://www.twinings.co.uk/hot-chocolate-coffee-other-drinks/hot-chocolate-and-malt-drinks/twinings-swiss-chocolate-drink Have discovered this drink - it's great, labelled gluten free and is also fortified.   I can't drink too much milk as I get bloated, but find it tastes really nice even made mostly with hot water and just a small amount of milk.  Thank you Twinings.
    • Ennis_TX, thank you for your response! I will take heed of all your nutritional pieces of advice, one by one. And yes, I am aware that a gluten marathon is on the horizon soon.   Before doing the test, however, I shall try to fortify my diet with the nutrients you mentioned, and report back in a week or two.   I think adding some iron supplement is wise too.    
  • Upcoming Events