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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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I have medium to dark brown hair - was blond as a kid. I started to get grays very early. Now I have a problem that every time I dye my hair brown to cover the grays it turns red, no matter how much ash is used. Interesting article on the redhead connection.

http://howtobearedhead.com/2011/09/to-go-gluten-free-or-not-that-is-the-question/

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Yep, I'm also a redhead. Red hair is recessive, and so is celiac. I wonder if they're linked somehow in a way we haven't discovered yet.

Or, as someoene suggested above, could just be the gene pool.

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Yup I'm another ...I got auburn hair and am part Irish..

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Yep, I'm also a redhead. Red hair is recessive, and so is celiac. I wonder if they're linked somehow in a way we haven't discovered yet.

Or, as someoene suggested above, could just be the gene pool.

Just a FYI - Celiac is not a recessive trait. Not sure about red hair as what may be percieved as red may actually be blond or brown genetically?

http://www.curecelia...he-other-parent

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Just a FYI - Celiac is not a recessive trait. Not sure about red hair as what may be percieved as red may actually be blond or brown genetically?

http://www.curecelia...he-other-parent

Good point. The other sources I read were probably wrong.

As for being a redhead, I'm talking about true red hair: http://genetics.thetech.org/ask/ask44

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Dark brown and got my first greys at age 20.

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I am blonde--but had alot of reddish tones when I was young...Some grey hair--so I use hair dye to match my regular color now. Although I am not dx with Celiac--I have many issues (past and present) that Celiacs also have. Our "sensitive" nature to the world around us maybe? :D

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Light brown/dirty blond but my dad is (was) a redhead.

How many of us have relatives with red hair?

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