• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Alcohol Allergy?
0

8 posts in this topic

I am very confused as to why I continue to get the celiac symptoms and think I narrowed it down to 2 possibilities. 1, is it it possible to be allergic to alcohol?(non gluten type) I was having problems drinking BAcardi rum, so I switched to driniking Grape Vodka, and not in any sort of quantity. I am completely hammered with all the usual fun symptoms (bowels, terrible brain fog, etc) even with just 2 drinks, it seems like I have the hangover of a lifetime which just gets worse as the day goes on.

THe 2nd possibility is this bread mix I get from Ireland. It is gluten free according to European standards, but it contains wheat, saying the gluten was removed.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


My sister (whoc doesn't have celiac disease) might not be allergic but she has quit drinking because it makes her feel so bad. Even one drink.

richard

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Richard. I guess thats the route I'm going to have to go and see if things improve. If nothing else I'll save a few $$$ while I find out.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi -

I stopped drinking about two years ago after being an on-again, off-again moderate drinker for about 10 years (I live in a town that makes beer, it's the drink of choice around here). Anyway, I had figured out I was hypoglycemic but couldn't understand what the deal was with alcohol. At this point I can have wine/etc in cooked foods but I can't drink any, if I have 2oz of wine I will have a major blood sugar spike and drop and the next day feel terribly hung over.

I was never an alcoholic but I feel like a recovering one now, when I have to turn down alcohol at a party, etc people look at me with pity, or even with respect - "I really ought to quit, too..." some will say. Then I try to explain it wasn't alcoholism that stopped me, but just feeling really terrible, my health, etc, but then I feel like I'm protesting too much. Anyway, it's weird sometimes but feeling better is worth it.

About the bread mix, I've heard Euro standards are different and I'd question it anyway, if there's wheat of any kind in it I'd be wary, but then again I'm not brave enough to try oatmeal, either.

Take care

Stephanie

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In Europe they use Wheat Starch and they believe it to be gluten free. I don't think I would try it. I just don't think it is worth the risk. I guess this is also a warning to double check all the labels on any gluten-free products that are made in Europe! I mostly buy products made in Australia and Canada, not because I don't trust the other countries, but because I like the taste of the products and I stick with what I like. I am hesitiant to waste anymore money on trying new things when I am happy with what I have.

I also don't drink any type of grain alcohol, never liked beer, and only have wine about once a year when I visit my sister. I don't buy it at home...

God bless,

Mariann

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Question on the Bacardi Rum...Are you drinking DARK rum or light, because many dark rums are made with a caramel coloring that sometimes is NOT Gluten Free. I stick with light colored alchohols. Many spirit makers refuse to disclose what is in their products. I found out by getting sick. Many whiskeys and bourbons are safe while others are not. Kesslers brand bourbon is safe while Makers Mark brand is not. Makers Mark is very expensive too compared to Kesslers.

Wendy

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would look hardest at the bread mix. I don't think it is possible to take the gluten out of wheat.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the responses! In as far as the rum, its been strictly Bacardi (the normal clear one). I play darts at a local pub and the bartender has been really accomadating, we've gone so far as to use plastic cups and bottled mixers for me, and when I gave up on the Bacardi, he went out and bought the Ciroc grape vodka. So I'll begin by stopping the bread mix and the alcohol (not my chianti...yet) and the see if I must lose the wine too or add either the bread or booze back to see if it has been one or both that getting me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,797
    • Total Posts
      932,502
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,282
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    lyoncallies
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I think he's right. It's a hard burden at times at any age but there will be particular challenges for your daughter as kids don't want to stick out or have to be continually monitoring things like their food. Check out this advert from a UK retailer. Beware it's so sugary it could probably give a diabetic person a sugar crash! Maybe you could do similar? Just get or make a selection of kid friendly foods but don't say anything about it to your daughter, just everyone go in and start filling their plates.  If she asks you if you've done anything for her you just tell her that she can eat everything on the table. At least this would show both that choice is still available to her and that because everyone is eating the same thing that she won't feel like she's being singled out?  
    • Hi Michael and welcome The celiac diagnosis process can be a little confusing. Some time ago I tried to put together some info and links that may be of help:    The key point would be to stay on gluten until you and your doctors are satisfied that celiac has been excluded. In your case that may include another test with a more complete panel as CyclingLady says above. If you go gluten free independently during this time you risk invalidating the results and adding to uncertainty. The second suggestion would be that should you succeed in eliminating celiac as a diagnosis then you have nothing to lose from trying the gluten free diet. I tested negative on blood and endoscopy, but removing gluten resolved or greatly improved a whole load of symptoms including anxiety, depression and that feeling of not being right that you outline above.  I say greatly improved because I can still suffer from anxiety or depression, as anyone can, but if I do, they're nowhere near as severe as they were when I was consuming gluten.  In the meantime, one thing you could do is to keep a food journal to see if you can track any relation between what you eat and how you feel. It's good practice for if you later try the gluten free diet and you never know what you may learn.  This is a good site full of friendly help and advice. I hope you get the help you need  
    • “I was coming here before I was diagnosed with celiac disease, but after, it was one of the few places I could go to since they had gluten-free items,” ... View the full article
    • Good advice Ennis!  I would add baking and freezing some gluten-free cupcakes to have on hand, so that she is never left out.  Be sure to read our Newbie 101 tips under the coping section of the forum.  Cross contamination is a big issue,  If the house is not gluten free, make sure everyone is in board with kitchen procedures.   Hopefully, your GI talked about the fact that this AI issue is genetic.   Get tested (and your TD1 child).  TD1 is strongly linked to celiac disease.  About 10% of TD1's develop celiac disease and vice versa.  Get tested even if you do not display any symptoms.    http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/diagnosing-celiac-disease/
    • What does weak mean?  Like you squat down and and you can not get back up?  Or are you fatigued?  When you said blood panel, was your thyroid tested?  Antibodies for thyroid should be checked if you have celiac.  So many of us have thyroid issues.  
  • Upcoming Events