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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

My Husband Is Vegan And I Am Gluten Free
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16 posts in this topic

My husband and I are having issues with food. We both started out as vegetarians about a year ago and he recently went completely vegan because dairy makes him have intolerable allergies. (seriously; he's been known to eat benedryl like candy - when we discovered cutting dairy out of his diet made the allergies stop, we were amazed!) And now I am putting myself through all these ridiculous food tests, and reading everything I can about celiac because all signs point to me having it. I have started eating meat again since going gluten free because it was too difficult trying to find food and I was showing signs of anemia. Now, my husband doesn't eat meat or dairy but eats everything else and I can eat anything except wheat and gluten. This is causing problems for us because we're not eating together as a family as often because its easier to cook our meals individually. our grocery bill has spiked an insane amount. I find that I'm having horrible feelings of guilt and I can't think of anything to cook other than vegetables and tofu (which we are both soooo sick of). does anyone have any suggestions or recipes or resources so we can use so we can both be well fed and healthy?

THANK YOU

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Do either of you do fish?

How about adding beans and nuts as a protein source?

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We eat fish, nuts and beans. There are things that we can eat together, but they can only go so far. He says tired of eating the same things over and over again. I think he is frustrated with me and with the whole gluten free thing.

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I second the beans suggestion. Lentils don't need to be soaked, so they're very convenient. The red or yellow ones cook in about 30 minutes, and make a wonderful puree for soups and stews. You can also use them to make veggie burgers. Millet, buckwheat, teff, amaranth and other grains are also good in all sorts of dishes, or in place of rice.

If you don't already, use cornstarch or arrowroot, or other starchy flour instead of wheat flour for thickening gravies. Use Tinkyada pasta for even more meals that the two of you can enjoy together. Adding a few colorful beans and veggies will not only be healthy and taste great, but also give it plenty of eye-appeal.

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I guess my first reaction is that it's 100% OK to eat different meals. Sitting together to eat dinner is what makes it a "family dinner" - not eating the same food.

But if you are wanting to eat the same foods, I would focus on beans and soy for protein and of course lots of vegetables and fruits. You can do rice, quinoa, amaranth, etc. for grains. We love to do soups/stews - I eat them plain and my husband serves them over a grain.

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if he's tired of eating the same things, you guys just need to get creative and learn to make new things. I am gluten and dairy free (though I am not vegetarian, as I'm hypoglycemic, and I cannot get a high enough protein/carb ratio while vegetarian to keep my blood sugar balanced). there is such a huge variety of foods you can make vegetarian and gluten free. really, there's no limit. anything you could make vegan you can make gluten free (ok, maybe not tempeh :P), so start finding some cookbooks, and learning to convert. and one thing I'll often do if we've got vegetarian friends coming over is to make identical items, but one with meat and one without. (so, stirfry - one has no meat (but maybe mushrooms) and the other has meat (but no mushrooms as my husband doesn't like them). you could easily make a primarily vegan meal, and make a small amount of meat to go with it for yourself.

this doesn't mean that you have to have a skyhigh grocery bill, though. stick to cooking whole, unprocessed, naturally gluten free foods, and your grocery bill doesn't have to change. (yes, adding meat can certainly make it go up.)

of course, there is the obvious answer of "don't both be vegetarian", and I am not saying that flipply. what I mean is, are there allowances that your reasons for his going vegan will let him make. would he consider eating eggs? perhaps fish? some philosophic reasons are about animal welfare, but judicious choice of well raised (or wild) meats can help with that. some philosophic reasons revolve around violence, but you have to weigh violence to the animals towards violence towards the people involved, as violence is not purely physical. (this is one that I've 'been around' a lot, being a yoga instructor.)

take a look around at the recipes on the site, and that might help. (I make a mean thanksgiving dinner that coincidentally happens to be entirely vegan, even the pumpkin pie if I make one, outside of the turkey and the turkey gravy.)

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I understand completely! There are lots of good gluten-free pasta choices. I used DeBoles corn/quinoa pasta. Then there's Quinoa. It's a grain that's OK for us and is substituted often for barleys or couscous. If you both do fish, then experiment and get acquainted with all the different kinds! I tried my very first blue marlin yesterday and it was not at ALL like eating fish, but VERY GOOD! There's SO many different kinds and different things you can do with them with many, many flavors to play with. I would suggest that you keep looking at cookbooks and reading online recipes on forums like this one or other gluten-free boards. I have to substitute many things besides glutens also---dairies, eggs, rice, nuts, etc........ I have had many, many brain blocks and periods of time of feeling sorry for myself and feeling like I can't eat more than 2 things the rest of my life, lol. But then, suddenly, I'll read something or hear something that sparks an epiphiny of creativeness and I come with with several great ideas. It's a process. Fight thru it when you get down!!

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thanks to all who replied. these are very helpful suggestions. I am printing this forum out and husby and I are going to have a chat tonight about what the future holds.

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Hi, maybe try different gluten-free natural seasonings and spices to liven up the standard items you can share. We branched out into Indian food & recipes are plenitful.

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I was a vegetarian for many years before I went gluten free. After being gluten free and vegetarian for a while I decided to start eating meat again because I felt like my diet was too limited. However, there are a lot a meals that you can do that are both vegan and gluten free. Vegetable curries are yummy and versatile, you can add cannellini beans to salads or gluten-free pasta, or you could do lentil and rice salad. If you want to bake without butter you can use olive oil as a replacement. You have plenty of options, you just need to think outside the box a little.

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Check out: http://www.fatfreevegan.com/gluten-free/index.shtml

This is a site for Gluten-Free Vegan recipes.

Also, look into raw food cookbooks. There are a TON of amazing recipes that are all vegan and gluten free. You can make lasagna and pate and noodles and ravioli and desserts. Raw is a great resource for Celiacs. Plus, making raw food is faster than cooking. I make a mock-tuna that is to die for. It is vegan and gluten free and is great as a dip, on salads, or on rice bread.

Vegan and Gluten-free are actually very complimentary. Too many vegans eat a ton of bread and crackers and pastas just to have something to eat. It's better for vegans to be gluten-free because they then tend to eat healthier whole foods and get more veggies.

All the best to you both.

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I am celiac and don't eat meat unless I am at a restaurant and have no choice. My preferred easy meal is brown rice, beans, spaghetti sauce and hot sauce. Rice and quinoa is pretty easy to make in a rice cooker and can often be used as a substitute for pasta. Good luck.

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My dd was a vegan for a year and gluten-free for several months of that year. So I learned a few things.

Make meatless chili and if you want meat, add cooked hamburger to your portion. I got so used to eating it w/o meat that I actually like it better. Keep small packages of cooked meat in the freezer.

Make stir fry. Rice and veggies in the same pan. If you need meat, cook it in another pan and add it to your serving.

Make tacos and nachos with lots of toppings. Great to warm up leftovers the next day.

You can make lasagna with mashed potatoes, creamed corn or other veggies or mexican style. Layer desired fillings and bake in bread pans.

Rice and beans, add chicken or beef separately. I found Mexican or Chinese foods easiest to do gluten-free/v.

Make mexican topped spaghetti for a change.

These waffles are gluten-free/v and wonderful. I used to dislike waffles until I tried these:

http://www.recipezaar.com/312803 (I decrease any milk to 1 1/2 cups). Keep a banana in the freezer and thaw to use. Use agave nectar or maple syrup for the honey.

Put nuts, seeds and beans in everything.

The hardest thing to make was cheeseless pizza. Refried beans work well. Vegan cheese sauce made with nutrional yeast flakes if desired.

On the baking/cooking recipe section...find the post for dips for veggies that are dairy free. Found it:

http://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/index.php?showtopic=63493

Baked potatoes with meatless chili on top.

Oven baked jo-jos.

English Muffins:

http://www.foodphilosopher.com/assets/docs/090107gluten.cfm

http://glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com

Karina has lots of helpful recipes/ideas

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Have you been to the vegan/vegatarian celiac site: vegiac.com? You might find some help there.

I've managed to remain vegetarian since going gluten-free, but I won't say it hasn't been hard. It's definitely a limiting diet.

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There's a cookbook called "The Gluten-free Vegan".

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We eat fish, nuts and beans. There are things that we can eat together, but they can only go so far. He says tired of eating the same things over and over again. I think he is frustrated with me and with the whole gluten free thing.

This isn't helpful at all but sorry, I just had to laugh if he eats FISH and calls himself a "vegan". He is NOT a vegan, he's not even a vegetarian. He's just someone who doesn't eat most meat and doesn't eat dairy. Sorry, not helpful I know... just a HUGE pet peeve of mine because I actually WAS a vegetarian for many years, a real one, and hearing these people be like "Oh Im a vegetarian but I eat fish" just makes me want to scream. It's like NO, you're NOT a vegetarian.

Anyways back to topic, I suggest learning a lot of foreign foods like curries. Mmm I love curry. I'm VERY limited. No soy, no gluten, no dairy, no corn, no chickpeas. Curry saved my life. You can throw anything in there and its always very yummy.

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