• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

How Big Is This Iceberg ?
0

Rate this topic

18 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

I know that Celiac disease of the gut is just the tip of the Iceberg of the gluten and other food intolerance diseases that are plaguing humanity . It wasn't until this past March that I learned about celiac disease , I thank Celiac.com and this forum for a great deal of what I've learned. I've probably had celiac problems for 50+ years, like being short and asked to join the wrestling team my 1st year of high school, they needed a little guy for the lightest ( 92lb ) bracket, I weighed 89Lbs !! I've had skin problems for 30+ years, been going to doctors for 25 years , kept hearing systemic dermatitis----- take these antibiotics... about 4 years ago went to the V.A. figured it might be Agent Orange from Vietnam . they said not agent orange. in May they took the wrong kind of skin biopsie again even after I told them I suspected Dermatitis Herpitiformis. when it came back no infection I asked does this mean it's an autoimune disease, they said oh no it must be your nerves , quit scratching???? In April I started my Gluten free learning curve, and after a while I realized why you need to be 100% gluten free. my D.H. is 90% better (still eat a lot at resturants ) and have lost about 30 lbs as I had become obiese thru the years,,, another symptom doctors don't recongnize. Bottom line I'm self diagnosed but I believe it's the answer as a number of other problems have also resolved... sorry about the long story to get to my question, as I have read about the many symptoms of celiac disease and Gluten/food intolerances with the autoimune problems that come with them,,,, I can't believe what I'm seeing......... I'm starting to feel that half the people I know have something going on thats related to the unrecognized "Iceberg" of a problem !!!!!!!! when I went to my son's house for thanks giving dinner I almost cried as my 3 year old grandson had a red sore the size of a pencil eraser on his face (cheek) with a couple of other small red marks a few inches away, I didn't say anything. some one else asked about it, my daughter inlaw said that he had a pimple come up and that he had scratched it... I'm starting to think that I'm getting paraniod about how big this problem really might be. How big is this Iceberg ? Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


How big is this iceburg? Real Big. Celiac is rampant in this country and it amazes me how little many doctors know about it. I was undiagnosed for a really long time also and had a lot of systems effected so I know first hand how many body systems it can effect. I can't count the number of doctors who told me to learn to live with the pain. I also couldn't believe how much resolved gluten free. The NIH estimates that up to 98% of us are misdiagnosed or undiagnosed. It is so sad in this time when health care costs are skyrocketing and Americans are the unhealthiest population in the world that so few doctors even think to check for it.

It is also heavily genetic so I would advise all your relatives to get tested. Do mention it so the little one can be tested, he may have other issues both physical and mental that you aren't aware of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have read that about a third of the USA population has some of the genes for celiac. But only about 1% will actually develop celiac disease. Quite a discrepancy there so it seems they don't really know why some people develop the active disease but most don't. There is a video on the NFCA by a Mayo clinic doctor who says the rate celiac appears to be rising. The general reccomendation I've seen is to test all first degree relatives for celiac. They say the testing in young children is not as reliable as though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Early on a lot of people suddenly think they start seeing celiac in every other person. Reality is that no more than 1 percent of people have or will have celiac. A red spot on your grandson's face does not mean celiac. Occasional diarrhea or fatigue does not mean celiac. A pattern of some of these things, especially in people with a family history, means check it out. So, yes, you are indeed being a little overly attentive to the issue. There are those who argue that wheat is bad for all humans but I'm talking about actual celiac here.

BTW, all of your first-degree relatives should get tested, and that means your son.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's called an iceberg because no-one knows how many undiagnosed Celiacs there are.

Celiacs is on the rise because as more people become aware of it, more people are getting themselves tested for it, because the symptoms of Celiac Disease hits a chord with them.

1% of over 308,000,000 people is still a lot of people (in the US alone).

When I was first diagnosed with celiac disease (9 years ago) , 1 in 250 people had celiac disease where I lived. That is now down to 1 in 130 people and in the specific area I live it's actually 1 in 100 people, and that is because the local teaching Hospital has taken and interest in Celiacs Disease and are carrying out some major and interesting studies (this in a total population of 4,000,000).

Both my children have had negative blood studies and although I have told them that there a false negatives because they are now both adults both are refusing to get retested, both have problems when eating certain foods but just chose to ignore the fact that they could have celiac disease. One is overweight and the other skinny deathly pale and has many other allergy related problems, both are short in stature as I am. But what can you do...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Hi Dan-

I was 43 years old at diagnosis after at least 25 years of reporting very mild versions of the same symptoms that eventually became so bad I refused to hear "All your tests are normal - i.e. go-away" from one more doctor. It still took over a year and 50 blood tests for someone to finally run the tTG IgA test that started me on the path to celiac diagnosis. The only test over the years that indicated celiac for me would have been my constant anemia - for which each doctor would put me back on iron supplements.

Unfortunately our stories are not uncommon. Most recent statistics indicate that 1 in 133 people are Celiac - yet only a tiny fraction of those are diagnosed.

I have been comforted on celiac.com to hear stories of young 0-25 being diagnosed -- each time I think - How wonderful that they don't have the years of frustration and mysterious illness ahead of them!

As far as how big the iceberg is, I pose this question -- Who (celiac or not) feels better when eating a gluten filled diet? -- I know that my non-celiac husband and son feel better now that most of the gluten has been eliminated from their diet.

I agree that you should encourage your children to be tested. Unfortunately, gluten-free can be a hard sell for many.

-Lisa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I meet more and more people that tell me wheat does not agree with them. Usually they ask me why I am gluten-free and I tell them about the DH and swollen abdomen. They either have digestive issues, big tummy or a combination or some sort of skin issue. It is amazing.

Last night at the Whole Foods Juice Bar, a beautiful young girl asked me why I was getting only vegetable drinks. I told her about cutting sugar and skin issues. She told me she had acne and eczema type rash and had removed wheat and was mostly clear now.

The juice bar was insanely busy last night and it is really catching on at WF/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Hi Dan-

As far as how big the iceberg is, I pose this question -- Who (celiac or not) feels better when eating a gluten filled diet? -- I know that my non-celiac husband and son feel better now that most of the gluten has been eliminated from their diet.

-Lisa

Same here! My household.....

myself age 43 - diagnosed celiac

my son age 18 - diagnosed celiac

son #2 age 17 - lots of symptoms mostly gluten free now because we don't eat it at home

#2's girlfriend age 17 - diagnosed celiac

daughter age 15 - gluten free, soy free by choice - many symptoms have gone away

my fella age 43 -not a celiac but has learned to cook gluten free because he loves us

That's 5 outa 6 from three families.......

I think it's very prevalent. We are not "special" and that will upset some who have gotten a little high on themselves. They won't want to hear that there is nothing wrong with us. Humans should not eat grains!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
when I went to my son's house for thanks giving dinner I almost cried as my 3 year old grandson had a red sore the size of a pencil eraser on his face (cheek) with a couple of other small red marks a few inches away, I didn't say anything. some one else asked about it, my daughter inlaw said that he had a pimple come up and that he had scratched it... I'm starting to think that I'm getting paraniod about how big this problem really might be. How big is this Iceberg ? Dan

Why didn't you say anything? Not a judgement just curious. My kids say I'm relentless in my badgering of them to be careful not to eat gluten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The iceberg is HUGE....

When I first discovered that I felt better gluten free, and read about the role of celiac disease in opening the door for other autoimmune diseases to develop (http://www.umm.edu/news/releases/zonulin.htm), I warned my entire family via email that they should seriously consider going gluten free.

My father had rheumatoid arthritis, two of his sisters died from complications of lupus, one of my daughters has Hashimoto's thyroiditis and her daughter has celiac disease diagnosed via biopsy. Another of my daughters has lupus and Addison's disease and my adopted daughter (biological granddaughter) is definitely gluten sensitive if not celiac. My niece has Grave's disease. The whole idea of going gluten free to prevent "leaky gut" from triggering more autoimmune diseases is particularly important for families with a medical history like mine!!

But it isn't just limited to my blood relatives!! I put my entire immediate family (me, husband, two adopted kids = my biological grandkids) on the gluten free diet last January. My husband drank some beer after being gluten free for several weeks and promptly broke out with a horrible case of dermatitis herpetiformis! He had absolutely no idea that he had a gluten problem until that moment...he was just eating gluten free to make things easier for me! So surprise! he has celiac disease too!

I agree with previous posters....humans are not designed to eat grain, period!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Thank you everyone for responding,,,my family is suportive and trying to help me with gluten free food at family dinners, I did show them the DVD "Unlocking the mystery of Wheat and Gluten intolerance" by Thomas O'Bryan. so they are awhare that It's something to watch out for but they or I did'nt have any Idea how serious this is. I did'nt say anything about my grandson as I did'nt want to say I told you so. I'll give it a couple of weeks and see what happens. I know official celiac disease is now 1% and maybe 2% over 60. I remember 15 to 20 years ago that my friend at work had his young daughter was having these serious stomach intestinal problems where she could'nt eat some kind of foods and was in and out of hospitals. did'nt know what the condition was at that time, just felt sorry for them and the problems they were having. in the past while shopping at whole foods I noticed the gluten free products and thought that a lot of people must be following one of the hollywood diets. last december I was tested for sleep apnea and started Cpap, any Darlindeb 25 had posted on the cpap forum and mentioned celiac disease so I looked it up on the web and they showed skin problems as one of the symptoms, I had been looking for my skin condition on the web for a log time and that was the first time something looked like what I had. I know every cronic disease might not be caused by Gluten but from what I've been researching it maybe. doctors should be testing for this or at least telling their patients about the possibility if nothing else is helping so they could try a food elimination diet!!! now I think I'm seeing it every where . my mom came to live with me a while back, she ended up dying of complications of type II diabetis at 68, she had nuerapathy and was always going from Imoniom AD to doculax, she also had skin lesions on her shoulders and was obiese, my sister has been fighting thyriod problems, my oldest son 38 has been fighting depression bipolar problems for years, one of my lady freinds (short stature) has been diagnosed with ostopiena, she was taking ostomax but it made her feel worse. one of her neices is fighting bipolar. another lady friend has ruhmatoid atheritis pretty bad witha noticing bloated stomach and had stomach surgery last winter, I think ulceritis colitis. Her sister (both short stature) has the D&C problem,,, with her younger son 33 having severe IBS problems and her older son 40 had to move back in with her as he has MS and has to use a walker....one of my aunts died of ALS as did a coulpe of my other realitives........one of my daughter inlaws has a sister with MS.......and last week I saw one of my buddy's wife at the grocery store , in the past I had noticed that their son who was 5 or 6 at the time looked about the size of a 3 year old........she asked how I was doing I said better since I went on a gluten free diet because of my skin and that I might have celiac....she said that they took her son to the doctors because he was so small and that he was also having stomach problems,,she said the doctors said he did'nt have celiac as his test were negative.(can you believe that) I said look I'm not a doctor but these test come back negative alot of times,,, told her to please do her own reaserch on celiac and gluten...... this past week with her son , my grandson and my lady's 40 year old with MS has really got me agrivated with the medical profession.........I know there may be other causes for all this but at least gluten should be on their radar sceen,,,,,,,,,,Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dan300, it's much easier to read posts that are broken into paragraphs. Huge blocks of unbroken copy give most people headaches. In addition, a certain percentage of people simply skip what you have to say, as I did on your last post in this thread.

richard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sorry, I'm new to this and tried using spacing and paragraphing but when I add reply it condenses it all together, thanks Dan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dan,

I agree it is somewhat frustrating the amount of inertia the medical profession seems to have regarding celiac diagnosis. I think it may be improving some lately, but there is a long way to go on it. What seems really odd about it is that celaic is one of the easiest problems to deal with medically as far as making an improvement in people's health and also preventing future health issues. Celiac is what I would call low hanging fruit, easy to fix by proper diet changes and yet it is often not diagnosed until years of suffering have gone on. Maybe the doctors are too hung up on finding a tough nut to crack/complicated issue and can't see the simple answer in front of their noses.

It really is a head scratcher. When you think about how much money in health costs are spent needlessly each year by people who could vastly improve their situation just by changing their diet. And they say our government is trying to save money on health costs? They could take a look at celiac diagnosis and go a long way on it for not much effort. A series of public service announcements would sure help. And routine testing for children with family histories of autoimmune disease would help.

But we can help by spreading the word about celiac to our friends and loved ones. Everyone who hears about it is one more informed person after all. We can't make other people follow the diet, but at least we can let them know about possible benefits and risks.

There are advocacy groups around like CSA and GIG and NFCA that work on these issues. Things seem to be changing for the better, it is just slow slow slow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After going gluten-free I started noticing symptoms in people all around me, too, and started to suspect we were not meant to eat grain.

Then, two of my family members cut out all preservatives, artificial additives, and hydrolyzed proteins and carbohydrates; their symptoms evaporated, they lost weight, and they have more energy.

I followed suit, and have noticed that I'm even less bothered when I get glutened.

So perhaps it's more about all the junk in today's food than the grains?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I was the ONLY one in an extended Irish family of about 20. Thankfully, I was diagnosed very quickly... only 2 months after developing unrelenting diarrhea. 3 or 4 years later, my 25-year-old daughter started exhibiting the same symptoms. She's been gluten-free since.

Recently, my youngest daughter was diagnosed and wasn't too upset about it, having been thru it w/ me and her sister. Plus, she lives in Portland, OR, where there are gluten-free bakeries and entire restaurants! But now she's taking it even further, by having to deal w/ interstitial cycstitis, which is making a gluten free diet look like a piece of cake!

I told my oldest daughter to enjoy gluten while she can. I'd say the chances of her developing it are pretty good.

Older sister has many food allergies, but has been tested negative for celiac. She lives in France and just isn't willing to give up the amazing breads there. Older brother had episodes of eczema on his hands and noticed they lessened or disappeared when he simply cut down on wheat, but he's not been formally tested.

I've polled first cousins and no one else has it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dan, from another self diagnosed probable DH'r.

Your observations are right on, and symbolize both the potential size of the problem, as well as the difficulty in getting others to see what is in plain sight.

My daughter was tested for Celiacs when she was 11 (6 years ago); tests were neg. I accepted the dx and advice (you don't have to worry about wheat) at the time... didn't have a reason not too. But a year and a half ago there were a number of "issues" that she experienced. We sought and received standard medical treatments...but some things got worse before they got better. I finally connected the dots, and encouraged her to try a gluten free diet. Almost 7 months down the road, many of her issues have resolved or are resolving...she is a heck of a lot happier and healthier.

While watching her start her recovery, I had one of those "duh" moments. I had had a persistent rash on my legs for 10 months....no topical helped it...til I went gluten free too.

The familial connection is significant, I hope sometime you work up the courage to speak to your son or DIL to suggest the connection.... I have several relatives who have some of the same issues that either I or my daughter has/had. My niece is the only one who has figured out the gluten connection; she, her mom and I have discusssed this in relation to our family on many occasions. Its been mentioned to my brother, who also has a rash on his legs.... But as the saying goes, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make them drink.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After going gluten-free I started noticing symptoms in people all around me, too, and started to suspect we were not meant to eat grain.

Then, two of my family members cut out all preservatives, artificial additives, and hydrolyzed proteins and carbohydrates; their symptoms evaporated, they lost weight, and they have more energy.

I followed suit, and have noticed that I'm even less bothered when I get glutened.

So perhaps it's more about all the junk in today's food than the grains?

I do agree that overly purified, refined foods, as well as a lot of additives, also can have a detrimental effect, so I am not surprised that your family members (and yourself) experienced a positive difference.

But don't discount the effect of gluten.

Before I went gluten free, I had for several years, cut out every refined product I could and emphazied whole, fresh, natural foods. That did improve my over all well being. But it was only the elimination of wheat and gluten containing products that eliminated my rash. And, a few weeks after going Gluten free, I experienced a significant exacerbation of my rash (which had been resolving) after eating pasta at my brother's house.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,140
    • Total Posts
      939,876
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      66,129
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Serah
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Positive biopsy and blood work?  It sure sounds like your doctor made the right diagnosis.   Let me tell you my story.  Diagnosed after going for a routine colonoscopy because I am over 50.  GI saw my chart and noted that I was anemic.  I have a genetic anemia and I was iron deficient as well.  I lived like that my entire life.  But my wise GI ordered a celiac blood panel and it was considered mildly positive.  So, he ordered an endoscopy to my colonoscopy.   I had been dairy free since I was young.  Was told that I had an allergy.  I had not any GI issues with gluten.   I was an avid baker.  I had nut issues and also mushroom, garlic/onion, and egg intolerances.  I had some pretty severe allergies to medications (anaphylactic) and some seasonal allergies along cats and horses.   I was shocked.  My husband had been gluten free for 12 years prior to my diagnosis.  There is no way both of us would have gluten issues.  But...the tests did not lie.  My iron deficiency anemia resolved within months of my going gluten free.  Two months into the diagnosis, I fractured my back doing NOTHING!  I have osteoporosis as a results of having celiac disease.   Grief is completely understandable.  Denial is a part of grieving.  But the proof will be in follow-up blood tests and how you feel.   So, now I can eat nuts (not almonds), eggs (two a day every single)  and dairy.  Yes, ice cream!  I have yet to get back garlic and mushrooms, but I can live with that.   I have Hashimoto’s too.  .  Once you have one autoimmune disorder, you can develop more.  The gluten-free diet may help, not only your celiac disease, but your UC issues as well.   Try the diet.  I think you will be pleasantly surprised!  
    • Hi Sofie! Listen to KarenG.   We both had iron deficiency anemia when we were diagnosed.  Plus, I have Thalassemia which is a genetic anemia on top of the iron deficiency anemia.   Dumping iron into your system is not the solution.  You need to be seriously gluten free.  You are probably unknowingly damaging other parts of your body....like your bones.  Two months after my diagnosis, I fractured my back doing NOTHING!  Think you are just not getting enough oxygen to your brain?  Think again!  It is probably related to celiac disease.  Celiac disease is systemic.  It is not just about villi damage.   But why am I telling a college student this?   You should be researching your autoimmune illness and ensuring that you do not develop Cancer (rare) or another autoimmune disorder like lupus, diabetes, thyroiditis, MS, Crohn’s, or one of the almost 100 other Autoimmune disorders (common).    Get your antibodies down.  Your mild anemia is the least of your problems.  Raising  your ferritin level may help a little, but healing from celiac disease will help you a lot more!    
    • Let my start by giving a brief summary of what I’ve been diagnosed with. Just over the past year I’ve been diagnosed with Celiac, EOE, lactose intolerance, soy allergy, tree nut allergy. Most recently diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis. The Colitis came 8 months after having found out I had celiac. I have never had problems with gluten in my life. Dairy was something I had to eliminate because of the excrutiating stomach pains I would get from it. But I can have gluten any day and not have a problem.  I was diagnosed with a biopsy and followed by bloodwork. But who’s to say that dairy wasn’t the cause? I just feel like the GI was very quick to jump on the diagnoses without fully understanding my medical history, prescriptions I’ve took in the past ie long term antibiotic use, accutance, and 7 years of constant NSAID use.
    • I think she wants you to be strictly gluten free and heal.  Not give you things to patch up the damage you are causing by not getting your antibodies down and healing.   I am sure  she expected that you would take your diagnosis seriously and eat gluten-free.  4 months after your diagnosis, your antibodies would have gone down better.  But you weren't eating gluten free.  Eat gluten free. Take your supplements.  Read about the correct way to get your iron up - B12, vitamin C, don't take with calcium foods, etc  
    • Hello! I'm hoping to get some advice from y'all about iron IV infusions. First, some background: I was diagnosed with celiac disease at the beginning of June this year (2017).  I had labs done in March and my serum ferritin was 5 ng/mL. Hgb was 11.1, which isn't all that low, but is still flagged as below the normal range. I took 325 mg ferrous gluconate supplements daily for two months, and when my ferritin was rechecked, it was down to 4. The doctor ordered a celiac antibody panel and all of the levels were high. Confirmed with endoscopy at the end of May. A month later, I left for a 2-month study abroad program in France (aka the land of bread and pastries). After returning to the US at the beginning of August, I finally went gluten-free.  At the beginning of September, I returned to my University. Almost immediately, I realized I was really tired and was having a hard time making it through the day without a nap. I finally had a follow-up GI appointment around September 20th with the PA of the doctor who performed my endoscopy (not the same doctor from March). During the appointment, I asked her what we would do if my labs showed an iron-defiency. She told me that we would either do oral supplements or IV infusions, depending on whether or not she thought I'd absorb the supplements. When the lab results came in on the online patient portal, she made no comment on any of the iron-related results, just sent me a message that my antibody levels were still quite high, that I needed to keep up a strict gluten-free diet, and that we would recheck everything in six months. My ferritin was down to 3, Hgb was 10.3, iron saturation 6%, etc.  I was concerned about those results, so I called the PA's nurse and left a voicemail asking what the plan was for getting those levels up and got a portal message back from the PA saying that my hemoglobin was slightly low and will get better over time as I cut out all the gluten in my diet, but that I can start taking supplements if I want to speed up the process. I know that the Hgb still isn't that low, but it seems like the ferritin level is more serious. I went back for an appointment with the doctor who first found the iron-deficiency back in the spring and she seemed a lot more concerned. When I brought up IV iron therapy, she seemed to think it was a good idea. However, she's a primary care physician through my school's clinic, so she can't give me infusions. She called the PA with the intention of finding out whether or not she would change her mind about infusions, and had no luck. Interestingly, the PA's nurse informed her that they don't expect me to be able to absorb the supplements right away, and would consider IV infusions after I've been gluten-free for another six months.  I've done a bit of research on the IV infusions and it seems like I fit the criteria. Based on my antibody levels, I'm clearly not able to absorb iron any better than back in the spring, when the oral supplements did nothing for me. I understand that once my intestines heal more, I'll start being able to absorb iron better and should be able to boost my levels with oral supplements. However, I feel like I need a solution that will help me much sooner. I have a very demanding course load this semester and I'm constantly exhausted. I fall asleep doing homework at least twice a week. My grades are suffering, my mental health is suffering, and my relationships are being tested. I still don't have an explanation for why the PA doesn't think IV infusions are appropriate and I don't understand it. I really don't know what to do next because I'm afraid if I try to talk to the PA again, she'll get annoyed. I know that was super long, so for anyone still reading, thank you for bearing with me!! Now for the questions: 1. Do you think iron IV infusions in the near future would be a reasonable treatment for me? 2. Do you have any advice on how to make them happen? And if you have any other advice that's relevant to my situation, I'd love to hear it!   Thanks so much, Sofie
  • Upcoming Events