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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Two Celiac Parents
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7 posts in this topic

My boyfriend and I are thinking about taking things to the next level, getting married, and starting a family. We both have Celiac disease, which up until now has made things easier for both of us because we're always looking out for all kinds of food that might have Gluten. Our kitchen is Gluten Free, and when we go out on dates we usually call the restaurants first to get an idea of how much they know about what ingredients are in their food.

My sister has been diagnosed with Celiac disease and his mother has been diagnosed as well. We know that Celiac disease is in both of our families and are concerned about our kid's chances of having a normal diet. We know it would be easier in some ways to keep the whole family gluten free, but if they did end up with Celiac Disease they would be lucky to have two parents who are knowledgeable when it comes to gluten free living. I know it's not 100% that our kids would be Celiac, but does anyone have a better idea of what the odds are on that?

What parent doesn't want their kids to be able to go to birthday parties and eat cake!!

If there are other posts on this topic I would appreciate if you could link me to them!

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I don't want your post to go unanswered. So this is more of a reply to bump you.

From my memory....

If your sibling has been diagnosed you have a 1 in 10 chance.

The average American has 1 in 133 statistic.

You have to remember this auto-immune disease has a "trigger". Thought to be an illness, severe stress, chilbirth, and maybe even an injury.

Your child can go to birthday parties and have gluten free cake!

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Hmm, I seem to remember 1 in 20 chance. But don't take my word for it. We don't have a known family history but both my boys have it! Go figure. It's so common, that chances are more and more people are going to be diagnosed (with at least a gluten intolerance). There are plenty of ways to work around social issues. Don't get all worked up about the future. When you have a child they very shortly change any preconceived notions you have! :)

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My boyfriend and I are thinking about taking things to the next level, getting married, and starting a family. We both have Celiac disease, which up until now has made things easier for both of us because we're always looking out for all kinds of food that might have Gluten. Our kitchen is Gluten Free, and when we go out on dates we usually call the restaurants first to get an idea of how much they know about what ingredients are in their food.

My sister has been diagnosed with Celiac disease and his mother has been diagnosed as well. We know that Celiac disease is in both of our families and are concerned about our kid's chances of having a normal diet. We know it would be easier in some ways to keep the whole family gluten free, but if they did end up with Celiac Disease they would be lucky to have two parents who are knowledgeable when it comes to gluten free living. I know it's not 100% that our kids would be Celiac, but does anyone have a better idea of what the odds are on that?

What parent doesn't want their kids to be able to go to birthday parties and eat cake!!

If there are other posts on this topic I would appreciate if you could link me to them!

I don't know the exact percentage answer to your question, but we were told that our daughter with the same genes as our other daughter diagnosed with celiac, has a 40% chance of developing the disease. My opinion, in case you care, is that why would you chance it by giving the child gluten; you're both gluten free anyway. It seems to me (this is not medical knowledge, just an assumption) that your child would have a very high chance of being at least gluten sensitive with both parents being diagnosed celiacs. The child would never be able to develop celiac if they were never given gluten.

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My first thought is that i wouldnt let this be a deciding factor of having kids. Celiac is becoming much more widely known... in another few years, i imagine it will be even more prominent in today's society. think of how well you and your boyfriend are doing. why couldn't you raise a family? your kids will be very healthy with or without allergies and intolerances because you are aware of ingredients and are more likely to have healthy food in your kitchen. have children and wait until about 6 mos to a year before you add gluten into the diet (if you should choose to) and then i would go ahead and have all your kids tested when they are around 2 or 3. this is what my husband (we've been married for one year now!!) and i have decided. i am gluten free and he isn't. if our kids are not celiac they will eat gluten free when i cook but will also have regular cereal and crackers and things. if this becomes too difficult and i frequently become contaminated we will look into other options.

best of luck to you and your boyfriend!

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I was told after my diagnoses that based on my family history, my children would have a 50% chance of developing the disease. But in my case, my paternal grandfather, a non compliant, was diagnosed around 30 years ago, my father, also non compliant, has gluten intolerance with DH, and I was diagnosed with adult acute onset celiac. Turns out that both of my girls have celiac. They were actually born with it active. And it really is okay, they don't mind. And my oldest,6, who just started school, enjoys tricking people into trying her foods, because they never realize what they are eating, like a birthday cake made out of rice! Another thought is, childhood obesity statistics are rising in this country. While a celiac child may still struggle with their weight, there will automatically be no fast food, no snack cakes. Your children are more likely to have a healthy, balanced diet from the start. And my husband's personal favorite, he is already stressing about the teenage years, alcohol is pretty much out. Good luck to both you. I hope you feel at ease with whatever you decide.

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And my husband's personal favorite, he is already stressing about the teenage years, alcohol is pretty much out. Good luck to both you. I hope you feel at ease with whatever you decide.

Hate to break it to your husband, but even when I've been a strict adherent to the gluten free diet? I always found a type of alcohol I could drink. (I was the type of teen that was worlds better than some, but still made my parents' hair turn grey.)

If anything, because I couldn't have cheap beer or wheat vodka, I hit harder alcohols more readily. Of course, these days I barely drink even though I'm actually legal. Go figure.

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