• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Gluten Free Grains - Sorting The Myths From The Truth
0

14 posts in this topic

There seem to be a lot of myths flying around and it's hard to know what to believe sometimes. Here are some of them:

QUINOA My natropath seemed to think quinoa contained some gluten. Actually it seems that quinoa is not even a grain but a seed related to leafy green vegetables like spinach. So it's totally gluten free, it makes me bloated, but maybe that's a contamination issue? Bobs Mill sell a gluten-free quinoa.

Millet I came across one website recently that was saying Millet contained gluten, another myth! Millet is a gluten free grain.

Oats Myth: oats are not gluten free. They contain no gluten it seems, as long as they are free from contamination, but they do contain a protein that is similar to gluten. I have eaten 'pure oats' and they definitely tend to upset my stomach if I eat too many, so I guess I'm sensitive to the protein they contain.

Have you come across other myths about gluten free grains? Do you eat oats and do you get a reaction from them?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Quinoa--I eat it all the time and love it. It is easy for me to eat too much. It has lots of fiber.

Millett--Love it too. No problems that I can tell.

Oats--I avoid the gluten free oats because I reacted horribly. I had heartburn, bloating, abdominal pain, constipation and a nice painful rash on my bottom. :o There are those who eat them without incident (I'm jelous! :lol: )

I would recommend not buying from bulk bins. The store that sells this in bulk around me had oat groats in the buckwheat! Sucks. How hard would it be to have the gluten grains separate from the gluten free ones?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good that you love the quinoa and can eat it no problem. Yes I'm jealous of those that can eat oats too, I definitely get a bit of a reaction.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The CSA had an article about celiacs who react to oats a while back.

I seem to remember them saying there are something like 10 to 15% of celiacs who do react to oats. I used to eat oats all the time, but I can 't do them anymore.

Quinoa is supposed to be rinsed well before cooking as it has a natural coating on the seeds that can irritate some people's stomachs. So, that might be an issue. It needs to well rinsed to get rid of that coating.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buckwheat is not actually wheat, or even a grain. It is also a seed and is gluten free.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


There is a high degree of contamination with oats. Often they are harvested with the same equipment as wheat, stored in the same silos as wheat, and/or transported with the same equipment as wheat. But as was previously stated, even if the oats are certified gluten free and have been carefully handled, a certain percentage of celiacs will still react to them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Buckwheat is not actually wheat, or even a grain. It is also a seed and is gluten free.

Good info for those who are not aware that buckwheat is gluten free. My complaint with the bulk bins was with the oats. I don't eat oats, even gluten free ones and they were in the buckwheat that I wanted to purchase. It would be so simple to separate the gluten grains/seeds from the gluten free ones. They showed me the bulk bag they bought the buckwheat in and it stated gluten free on the bag, but they contaminated it the minute they put it out. Who knows even if they use the same scoops etc. for all of the grains. This is why I will never buy from bulk bins.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've gotten sick eating Quaker oats (I know, I know, idiotic idea to sit down to a bowl! lol) but I DO eat Bob's certified gluten free Irish Oats and the rolled oats without any problems. Even went so far as to have a blind test with my husband (he was not thrilled with me doing it, but saw the value... or at least the value I put on knowing) to make sure I wasn't imagining an issue. (The first several months after being diagnosed it's easy to reach a point where every twinge/ache/stomach flutter "must be gluten" rather than simple things like: carsick, stressed, dealing with the inlaws.....)

Some folks CAN handle oats (certified gluten free) right off the bat, some seem to need a year or so to let their system heal, and some folks never will be able to eat them. (My poor nephew doesn't just have celiac - he's outright allergic to oats, rice and soy as well!)

Personally? I'm thrilled to pieces with the Bob's oats. I grew up eating oatmeal for breakfast almost every day and the first 6 months when I wasn't able to eat oats (couldn't find gluten free and my system was so wonky) were tough.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's interesting about the percentage that react to oats. I think I just have to be careful and not have them too often or in large amounts.

Yes it could be the outer coating on the quinoa that is irritating my stomach, thanks for the advice I'll make sure I rinse it better next time.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's an interesting flour too, very nutritious and I'd love to easily be able to get hold of some!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bulk bins are definitely best avoided. In one store when the manager asked if I wanted to get the gluten free flour I was buying from the bulk bin, as it was cheaper, I said it could be contaminated. He immediately asked if I have celiac disease and when I said I did, he said that it's best to get the gluten free packaged flour instead.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've read that the molecular structure of oats is quite similar to that of wheat, and the small intestine of some celiacs will therefore react to even g.f. oats for this reason.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There seem to be a lot of myths flying around and it's hard to know what to believe sometimes. Here are some of them:

QUINOA My natropath seemed to think quinoa contained some gluten. Actually it seems that quinoa is not even a grain but a seed related to leafy green vegetables like spinach. So it's totally gluten free, it makes me bloated, but maybe that's a contamination issue? Bobs Mill sell a gluten-free quinoa.

Millet I came across one website recently that was saying Millet contained gluten, another myth! Millet is a gluten free grain.

Oats Myth: oats are not gluten free. They contain no gluten it seems, as long as they are free from contamination, but they do contain a protein that is similar to gluten. I have eaten 'pure oats' and they definitely tend to upset my stomach if I eat too many, so I guess I'm sensitive to the protein they contain.

Have you come across other myths about gluten free grains? Do you eat oats and do you get a reaction from them?

Don't quote me but I heard that is typical for quinoa, I get gas too and so does my DD and I believe it's because it's high in fiber and also it has some coating to it that is supposed to cause GI distress. So I was told to soak it for a few hours and then rinse thouroughly before cooking. Before I would just rinse it til the water runs clear. Also it's weird, but I notice it all the time in my DD's stools, almost like she is not digesting it, she's 2 by the way.

About millet, one of my favorite flours, haven't had the grain by itself yet.

Oats, I can't tolerate, it's been a long time since I tried even gluten-free oats and I don't mind because I honestly can't stand oats and anything with oatmeal at all, lol. So I guess this worked for me.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We buy Ancient Harvest Quinoa and I LOVE LOVE LOVE it! :) We eat it all the time, it's nice because it's prerinsed, no rinsing required and I've never had a problem with it! Red quinoa is my favorite.

I've had gluten free oats a handful of times since going gluten free and haven't had a problem yet! (Cross my fingers) I use it mainly in Apple Crisp, so I'm not eating a lot of it at a time. I'll have to try a bowl of it sometime, though. Haven't worked up the nerve yet, hearing others' stories of getting sick from gluten-free oats. Would make for a great breakfast, though, if I can handle a whole bowl of it :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,396
    • Total Posts
      930,322
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      63,813
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    AnemiaJen
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I think that if you soaked in the paddle in vinegar and scrubbed it a few times, you will be fine.  But if in doubt, just set the mixer aside for a while until your family's health has improved.  In the meantime, use your arm to mix dough!  My grandma never had a mixer!   I bought a bunch of new stuff because I had been married for 25 years when diagnosed.  It was time for new things!   Everyone is different in their response to gluten.  Science has given us a good estimate, but we know that nothing is "one size fits all".  You just have to figure out what is best for you and your family.   My anemia resolved within months of being gluten free (ferritin levels).  I still have Thalassemia, but it is mild and my body has adapted.  It is most likely the one reason that I never made the Olympic team!  😆 BTW, family and friends are not allowed to bring in gluten into our house with the exception of beer.  They can contribute to a potluck by bringing beverages, uncut fruit and veggies, new condiments, tableware, and ice cream ......etc.
    • Thank you so much. It's so nice to have such friendly and helpful people to talk to while I await my answers.  I had an interesting experience yesterday... I ate a bowl of Kraft mac n cheese... then passed out for 4 hours and woke up vomiting. I've had a lot of experiences like that after eating over the past 2 years, but I never put those pieces together because celiac disease was totally off my radar. Just found it very interesting.  I've been pushing down lots of gluten-y foods just to make sure my tests will come out right. So tired of waiting! Really, if this isn't the answer to my 40 lb mysterious weight loss, fatigue, and painful gas/bloating... then what's left? Cancer doesn't seem likely in a 33 year old, but I am really scared.  Thanks for helping me through this. Anyone who stumbles accross this place is lucky to find such supportive and kind, helpful people!
    • Hello and welcome I don't have an answer, like you I'm eating rice in processed foods as well as a side dish so I'm also wondering if I'm eating too much. If the rice is in a product like flour there's no way to tell how its prepared etc However for this: You can pre soak and rinse the rice in advance and change the way you cook it to reduce your exposure by up to 80% Details: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2F1MDzyW55pg97Tdpp7gqLN/should-i-be-concerned-about-arsenic-in-my-rice    
    • I use almond, and coconut a lot now my bakery used to use oat and almond blends. We never used rice, or starches as our goal was to keep it low glycemic. Now days we are transitioning to cut out oats. I started having....ok I omitted and gave in after being in denial a similar reaction to oats (10% of celiacs do if I recall) over a year ago. Anyway as for flour blends premade avoiding rice and grains try simple mills at https://www.simplemills.com/collections/all I have composed a huge list of various gluten-free goods here, even recently updated with grain free, and pizza section https://www.celiac.com/gluten-free/topic/117090-gluten-free-food-alternatives-list/  
    • Hello Everyone, New here and have joined because I couldn't find an answer to my question online. I was diagnosed after a long spell with anemia in 2015 and have been on the diet (and improving!) ever since. But I wonder whether how much rice I'm eating is very healthy. I have always liked to bake and it took awhile to find a flour mix I like (Cup 4 Cup - worth its weight in gold...), but a lot of gluten-free food subs in rice (white rice, brown rice, rice flour) plus I eat actual rice as a side dish. Is this too much? Keep in mind, I also eat salads like it's my job and love making vegetable soups too. Any advice on gluten-free foods (specifically flours) that don't fall back on rice as a substitute? I should add that I can't really get excited about quinoa, despite my best efforts. Thanks in advance.  
  • Upcoming Events