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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Question About The Uk "not Suitable For" Label
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5 posts in this topic

Hello :)

I just bought some sweet chili stir fry sauce from Sainsbury's, then got home to notice the "not suitable for wheat, gluten, milk (etc.) allergy sufferers due to the methods used in the manufacture of this product."

Now I know this should be a no brainer. It clearly says on the package that the product is not suitable for me, and I should therefore not eat it. I was just wondering though, if this is similar to the US "may contain" label which is incredibly overused (and in fact I eat some things which have that label with absolutely no problems).

Thanks in advance to the gluten-free English folks who can provide me with any insight :)

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Hello :)

I just bought some sweet chili stir fry sauce from Sainsbury's, then got home to notice the "not suitable for wheat, gluten, milk (etc.) allergy sufferers due to the methods used in the manufacture of this product."

Now I know this should be a no brainer. It clearly says on the package that the product is not suitable for me, and I should therefore not eat it. I was just wondering though, if this is similar to the US "may contain" label which is incredibly overused (and in fact I eat some things which have that label with absolutely no problems).

Thanks in advance to the gluten-free English folks who can provide me with any insight :)

Plain and simple..... I wouldn't cook it for my guys <_<

That is only my opinion though. I do use stuff that doesn't specifically say 'gluten free' but has nothing dodgy in the ingredients.

I see it as damage limitation ;)

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Plain and simple..... I wouldn't cook it for my guys <_<

That is only my opinion though. I do use stuff that doesn't specifically say 'gluten free' but has nothing dodgy in the ingredients.

I see it as damage limitation ;)

Thanks Nikki for your very logical response :D (I know I've mentioned this before but your country is the best for gluten-free. I love it)!

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Hello there,

My understanding is that this message indicates a risk of cross-contamination, so I guess it's the same as the more common 'may contain' message. I wouldn't eat foods with either label.

When I first went gluten-free, I was halfway through a bag of Sainsbury's beansprouts, which are also marked as unsuitable - it hadn't occurred to me to check something that simple.

Allie

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Was just about to ask about this. I've been eating gluten-free crisp or cracker breads for lunch and my asthma is back as are the neuro symptoms. I can tell within half an hour, now if I've had something troublesome so i know it's these that are the culprit. Stupidly, I took the risk based on the ingredients and ignored the "not suitable for milk allergy" message, thinking they were covering their backs.

New Coeliac Lesson 1001 I guess.

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