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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

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I was only diagnosed a couple months ago, and in the beginning, I found myself kind of depressed about being on the gluten-free diet. I missed being able to eat whatever I wanted, and it was even worse when I saw my friends and family eat things I couldn't have, in front of me.

But now, I feel like I don't even miss it. I was the grocery store with my roommate a few days ago, and the guy in line in front of us was buying two loaves of wheat bread. My roommate said, "Does that bother you?". My response was, Not only does it not bother me, but I no longer have a desire for it. I've found that the cravings are no longer there, especially since I've become so much more healthier since being gluten-free.

I had so many different health issues before. I felt like my life was a constant doctor appointment, and I always being tested for things, and never really finding out the cause. I had pretty bad anemia, and it got to the point where some days I couldn't even get out of bed. I wasn't able to work or go to school due to it. Now that I'm healthier, I was able to go back to college and do all of the things I wasn't able to before.

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I still miss being spontaneous and eating at any place at any time. But the food doesn't bother me otherwise. Some of it is that I have found substitutes that I really like. Hub made glutenfull pancakes today. They made the house smell wonderful but I didn't want any. I've actually discovered things to eat that I didn't know about. We like the rice tortillas for some things better than the whole wheat ones we used to get.

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I still miss being spontaneous and eating at any place at any time. But the food doesn't bother me otherwise. Some of it is that I have found substitutes that I really like. Hub made glutenfull pancakes today. They made the house smell wonderful but I didn't want any. I've actually discovered things to eat that I didn't know about. We like the rice tortillas for some things better than the whole wheat ones we used to get.

Oh yeah, I've actually had fun trying to discover all the possible substitutes. I do buy some of the alternative products, and I've done a lot of experimenting with baking. Actually, I think it was the baking that kept me sane in the beginning.

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I was only diagnosed a couple months ago, and in the beginning, I found myself kind of depressed about being on the gluten-free diet. I missed being able to eat whatever I wanted, and it was even worse when I saw my friends and family eat things I couldn't have, in front of me.

But now, I feel like I don't even miss it. I was the grocery store with my roommate a few days ago, and the guy in line in front of us was buying two loaves of wheat bread. My roommate said, "Does that bother you?". My response was, Not only does it not bother me, but I no longer have a desire for it. I've found that the cravings are no longer there, especially since I've become so much more healthier since being gluten-free.

My reaction to the gluten free diet was very similar to yours. I was soooo glad to learn what caused and how to prevent my excruciating gut pain that I didn't miss gluten, because I didn't miss the pain. Also I was coached during my first few days by a friend whose husband has celiac disease. She told me what foods and brands that I could substitute for all the gluten containing foods I previously ate.

Then I joined a local celiac support group and purchased a few books about gluten free living and cooking, which taught me even more. When the leader of my group resigned, I assumed leadership of that group for the next 3 years. As leader, I received many free samples of gluten free foods from companies which wanted me to introduce their foods to my group. I also organized and managed 2 celiac awareness walks and gluten free food fairs in my city. Being actively involved in the celiac community and learning as much as I could about gluten free living prevented me from 'missing' any gluten containing foods.

However, I had more difficulty adjusting to my other 6 food allergies (dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg) . Nevertheless, as I found substitutes (and companies made new, tasty substitutes) for foods which contained my allergens, I no longer missed those foods. Even with 7 food restrictions, I have many delicious choices, so that I never miss any foods which contain my allergens.

SUE

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My reaction to the gluten free diet was very similar to yours. I was soooo glad to learn what caused and how to prevent my excruciating gut pain that I didn't miss gluten, because I didn't miss the pain. Also I was coached during my first few days by a friend whose husband has celiac disease. She told me what foods and brands that I could substitute for all the gluten containing foods I previously ate.

Then I joined a local celiac support group and purchased a few books about gluten free living and cooking, which taught me even more. When the leader of my group resigned, I assumed leadership of that group for the next 3 years. As leader, I received many free samples of gluten free foods from companies which wanted me to introduce their foods to my group. I also organized and managed 2 celiac awareness walks and gluten free food fairs in my city. Being actively involved in the celiac community and learning as much as I could about gluten free living prevented me from 'missing' any gluten containing foods.

However, I had more difficulty adjusting to my other 6 food allergies (dairy, soy, egg, cane sugar, vanilla and nutmeg) . Nevertheless, as I found substitutes (and companies made new, tasty substitutes) for foods which contained my allergens, I no longer missed those foods. Even with 7 food restrictions, I have many delicious choices, so that I never miss any foods which contain my allergens.

SUE

Hi, i was diagonised celiac in january and at first found the diet really easy, managed to avoid dairy, sugar and yeast successfully to, but then came the soya intolerance and it took weeks to get my head round but i finally managed it, Then just when i thought things were improving bang comes the corn allergy and i cannot get my head round it. I spectacularly came off the wagon for a couple of weeks because ijust reacted to anything i ate so i figured i would eat whatever i wanted. Very stupid i know. I am now back to eating meat/fish/poultry/ limited fruit and veg and gingerly trying eggs. I feel worse and more lethargic eating tese foods than i did when i ae all my intolerances. I read on here about people baking and replacing their favourite foods but it always seems to contain some of my problem foods. The thought of six to twelve months on this diet doesn't sound appealing and i'm scared that when i have the cravings i haven't the willpower to resist. How does everyone else cope??? or are your symptons so severe they put you off???? I am scared that when i get this corn/fructose thing sorted that something else is gonna rear its ugly head and i will be left with nothing to eat.

Sorry for the rant but no one i know has any answers and the doctors are rubbish although i am back at the hospital tomorrow, i don't hold out much hope.

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