• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
0
HSM

Young Adults In Dairy Denial D:

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I have been eating gluten-free for over a year now, and although symptoms have improved, I am still sensitive to dairy. I have eliminated a large majority of the dairy from my diet, but am still consuming SOME yoghurt (plain),cottage cheese, natural chedder cheese and worst of all, the occasional bowl of ice cream

I tend to regret it within a few hours but I'm too stubborn to quit dairy all together

Is anyone else out there experiencing dairy withdrawls?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Absolutely! it's so hard- some dairy im ok with- small amounts of cottage cheese, ricotta, & butter. but cream, milk, ice cream, & aged cheese are hard on my system :(

i have to stop it or limit it, but im not ready yet <_<

so, ya i totally understand.

oh, also, i get GOAT milk yogurt at whole foods- and am fine with it. and Hemp milk with my gluten-free cereal- not bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely! it's so hard- some dairy im ok with- small amounts of cottage cheese, ricotta, & butter. but cream, milk, ice cream, & aged cheese are hard on my system :(

i have to stop it or limit it, but im not ready yet <_<

so, ya i totally understand.

oh, also, i get GOAT milk yogurt at whole foods- and am fine with it. and Hemp milk with my gluten-free cereal- not bad.

I drink almond milk straight, and with cereal... It's quite good and one of the better milk alternatives (nutrition-wise)

I am sensitive to goat milk/cheese as well, but I have tried Soy cheese and it's not bad...just not the same :(

Have you tried the lacteeze (sp.?) pill? I've heard it helps but I am a little hesitant to try it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drink almond milk straight, and with cereal... It's quite good and one of the better milk alternatives (nutrition-wise)

I am sensitive to goat milk/cheese as well, but I have tried Soy cheese and it's not bad...just not the same :(

Have you tried the lacteeze (sp.?) pill? I've heard it helps but I am a little hesitant to try it

I stay away from lactose as much as possible. On the internet somewhere I found a clear listing of how much lactose is in a variety of commonly consumed milk products. I have the list posted on my refrigerator. I totally avoid cow's milk (very high level of lactose) and ice cream (also high). I do however, eat cheeses and frozen yogurt with fairly good success with the help of Lactaid pills. The problem is remembering to take 2 before I eat the cheese or fro yo. My bf jokes that we need another sign on the fridge that says "Did you take your Lactaid yet?" LOL! If I take the Lactaid (and you can get cheap generic versions at Wal-Mart or Target), then I tend to be fine. If I forget, or take it after the first bite or two, forget it...it's a waste of time/money/energy. You must take it before your first bite to get it to work.

Good luck, and I highly recommend vanilla soy milk or almond milk for cereal, soy yogurt (still yummy) and Lactaid for anything else you dairy that you simply can't live without or are too stubborn to give up. (Yes, I'm a stubborn red-head...and I want my cheese and fro-yo dang it!) :0)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm lactose intolerant I diagnosed myself! I can not what so ever have milk! Like in some ice creams. Mashed Potatoes, have milk, green bean casserole.. But pretty much I can have cheese, yogurt.. I also take Lactaid pills 1pill if I want chocolate milk! Lol but like at thanksgiving I ate green bean casserole and totally forgot that it had milk in it about 20-30 mins later my tummy starts hurting so bad and I thought great it had milk in it... So I quickly take the Lactaid pill and my symptoms slowly go away!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


I self diagnosed lactose intolerance before I was diagnosed with Celiacs. The only thing I avoid is milk. I am thinking I should probably cut it all out. And I have never heard of Lactaid pills? Can anyone explain? :P But before I stopped drinking milk I was feeling these severe withdrawals to drink it. And not just a glass but several. As soon as I cut if off for a free days it stopped. I still want an occasional drink but I ignore it and grab another glass of water... I drink LOTS of water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't give up cheese, no matter how much it makes my stomach hurt or how much my mom badgers me. I'm not a shining example, sorry xD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I can't give up cheese, no matter how much it makes my stomach hurt or how much my mom badgers me. I'm not a shining example, sorry xD

I'm SOOO with you. By comparison, giving up gluten was way easier then giving up cheese... and butter. I can give up all the other dairy... but not cheese and butter... period.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want milk in my coffee again. *whine* Don't even make me think about cheese. :(

I tolerated dairy for a while but right now it makes me feel ill and tired. I am off it strictly but not happy about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i eat Daiya cheese substitute instead. Daiya is soy free and dairy free. Not too bad really.

I wonder if coconut milk would be good in coffee? Maybe with a little cinnamon sprinkled on? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


i eat Daiya cheese substitute instead. Daiya is soy free and dairy free. Not too bad really.

I wonder if coconut milk would be good in coffee? Maybe with a little cinnamon sprinkled on? :)

That Daiya looks good but I'm avoiding starch in the hopes of healing my gut and tolerating dairy again. I'm really glad to know it's out there, though.

The best I've found for coffee is almond milk. Coconut milk isn't bad but it's kind of thin. Rice milk is thin too, plus it has starch. Soy milk tends to curdle if you like your coffee hot the way I do. (Plus I'm avoiding soy.) Hemp milk is awful, at least the brand I tried. It has a strong flavor that clashes with coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah have trouble with dairy, I sometimes go back and forth, have trouble staying off of it, it's really addicting! It goes right along with my intense sugar addiction and i also have a sugar sensitivity. Chocolate, oh my god... Chocolate...

Coconut milk is really good replacement. I find it's especially milk like in icecream, and you can even make it yourself at home with some cans of full fat coconut milk, or buy the coconut bliss brand. Has anybody tried home-made nut milks? Almond, hazelnut or cashew milk? I've tried almond milk but I didn't make it almondy enough so it tasted watery, but I hear it can be quite good made with a good blender.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to be severely lactose/casein intolerant. I've been off gluten for a year and a half, and I gradually was able to tolerate ice cream, heavy whipping cream, and butter. Any aged cheeses, cheese, yogurt, half and half, etc, almost killed me. Now I can eat it all. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I first suspected lactose intolerance a few months ago but was too stubborn to eliminated it. You are talking to a person who used to drink 3-6 glasses of milk a day. That's in addition to the cereal, cheese, coffee creamer, etc. I've tried soy milk and rice milk as well as soy ice cream, but it's just not the same. It doesn't smell the same nor taste the same and I can never make myself stick with it for long, though I am still trying. Sigh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finally figured out something good for coffee. Use the rich coconut milk that comes in a can, not the watered-down "coconut milk" beverage. B) I even found an organic brand that doesn't have any guar gum or other additives. It gets a little lumpy in the fridge from the coconut oil but it dissolves fine in hot coffee.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


Aside from having the worst time giving up cheese (or even cutting back; I eat it on a near daily basis), I'm a Starbucks barista so there are constant dairy temptations. I have a cane sugar sensitivity so I try to avoid the soy milk, and the Lactose free milk makes me gassy :(

Plus, I have a ridiculous weakness for whipped cream when I'm at work.

Argh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh wow! This thread made me laugh so hard! I joined up just so I could reply!

My GP thinks I may be a Coeliac because I am bordering on being anemic. No matter what I do, I can't get my iron levels up!

Anyway, yeah I laughed cause this is so me! I was told that I was lactose intolerant as a baby/young child, but I eventually was able to tolerate dairy. I mean, if I had a milkshake/iced chocolate from The Coffee Club or something I'd feel really ill, but how often did I have them? I also had problems if I had a fair bit of chocolate.

Just recently, over Christmas, I was staying at my grandparents place for the week, and they have a crazy number of teas and coffee's. In one day we had 4 cups of tea, 2 coffees, two small bowls of ice cream and yogurt. I thought my stomach was going to explode!! Since then, I seem to be having difficulty with any lactose at all! Before I started the Coeliac diet, I was having the low fat Zymil milk on cereal which was much better. Recently I've been ignoring the whole dairy thing, and just having it anyway.. icecream (gluten-free gelato - I swear it has lactose!), iced coffees (on skim milk, no ice-cream/cream).. chocolate.. yogurt.. cheese.. OUCH!!! This morning my stomach feels as if it's just going to run away and leave me here - I wouldn't blame it actually!! :P

It's so good to know that there are other people who are like me, and keep messing up!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YESS! I miss dairy so much. But I quit it for good when I quit gluten almost three months ago. Today was the first time I have had chocolate in almost THREE MONTHS just because I never wanted to buy any that was dairy free, and then finally today I found some that my parents bought. It was beautifully delicious, I am still high from the endorphin.

I miss cheese the most though. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been eating gluten-free for over a year now, and although symptoms have improved, I am still sensitive to dairy. I have eliminated a large majority of the dairy from my diet, but am still consuming SOME yoghurt (plain),cottage cheese, natural chedder cheese and worst of all, the occasional bowl of ice cream

I tend to regret it within a few hours but I'm too stubborn to quit dairy all together

Is anyone else out there experiencing dairy withdrawls?

Ooh BIG time. When I cut dairy for the first time in 7th grade, I craved milk all the time. Though nowadays I've lost my taste for dairy milk because soymilk is so much richer and creamier, but other treats like cookies, ice cream, cheese, and pizza I miss bitterly. Whenever my friends are eating them around me and I'm not, I feel so deprived and like I'm sacrificing my soul.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I first suspected lactose intolerance a few months ago but was too stubborn to eliminated it. You are talking to a person who used to drink 3-6 glasses of milk a day. That's in addition to the cereal, cheese, coffee creamer, etc. I've tried soy milk and rice milk as well as soy ice cream, but it's just not the same. It doesn't smell the same nor taste the same and I can never make myself stick with it for long, though I am still trying. Sigh.

Try hemp and almond milk and coconut ice cream :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ads by Google:


I'm with you guys. I can't let go of the cheese. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I was in denial about the lactose intolerance last week but I was getting very sick again so I was forced to get rid of it and now I feel a lot better because of it. When I have the cravings I try to remember the times in my life where I would have given anything up to feel ok again. It usually doesn't seem as bad after that. Plus imitation cheese is good too :) and some lactaid ice cream

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread is helping psych me up to go dairy free. It seems so much harder than gluten free, but I've had two months straight of respiratory stuff and that coincides with a higher than usual for me dairy intake...it's time to give it a real try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      108,411
    • Total Posts
      941,139
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      66,339
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Tracy McGuinness
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • My daughter was diagnosed at 14 and now at 26 I can tell you she has a full and active social life.  She drinks gluten-free beer, wine, Tito's vodka (I'm making her sound like a big drinker, she isn't!) you can drink being gluten-free.  I was diagnosed before anyone knew what it was. There was no gluten-free food and very few restaurants would help me. So I can tell you that in this day and age it's not that hard. Every grocery store has gluten-free food. Many restaurants have gluten-free menus and/or understand it enough to modify their food for you (especially restaurants with a chef as opposed to some teenager cooking!). I almost never get glutened at restaurants anymore. I do however at people's homes so I try and steer clear of that.
        You can have pizza, bread, cookies, and so forth it all comes in gluten-free versions and if you ask around here you'll get some great advice on the products that taste the best. You'll get sicker if you don't follow the diet. You can do this and have a social life. 
    • Did a dermatologist AND  an allergist do allergy testing?  Derm tests for specific skin allergies. If your skin is coming in contact with substances that you are allergic to, you can get reactions that get the catch-all eczema label.   Same goes for allergies to dust, etc.  that you may come in contact with.  Years ago I would get deep itchy red areas that would surface; my skin would peel off until it was painful to touch anything.  Best diagnosis I could get was dishidrosis. It tended to be mostly on the palm side of my hand.  At some point allergy testing revealed an allergy to dust and mold, but avoiding these did not stop these episodes. Many years later I went to a good dermatologist who did skin allergy testing. After finding out I'm allergic to many fragrances and to nickel, I simply avoided these or wore gloves, and had no further flare ups. I recently went thru what I feared was DH. I had a rash with blisters that itched and burned. I had inadvertently used a hair product containing wheat protein, however it turned out to be the fragrance or dye in a dish soap I'd been using for a couple years.  Perhaps they changed ingredients, who knows.  After some light treatments, wearing gloves, and switching to a fragrance and dye free soap, my skin cleared up.
    • If you don't follow a gluten-free diet -- you'll probably start first noticing problems because of vitamin deficiencies -- your body can't absorb nutrients from your damaged small intestine; you will be more likely to get stomach cancer (the figure I remember seeing was 800x more likely), more likely to get colon cancer and other cancers; because it is an autoimmune disease it can trigger other autoimmune diseases (that cannot be fixed by dietary changes) like lupus and ms and certain types of arthritis.  WAY more likely to get hard to control diabetes.  There are now doctors that test for celiac when people come in with diabetes. Looking back I had symptoms in my teens, but wasn't diagnosed until I was in my 40's. Already had some bone loss (couldn't absorb calcium), had anemia for about 15 years that they couldn't fix, had lived with suicidal depression for decades that went away the 3rd day I was on a gluten-free diet, and had cancer.   You might not think so now, looking at all the things you feel you'll miss out on, but you are so very lucky to have been diagnosed at 19. Any problems you currently have will be reversible. gluten-free Pizza is great -- you just have to find the places that make it the best. The first couple months are the worst, because gluten seems like it is in everything, but once you figure out your new "go to's" for snacks and meals, it gets easier. Good luck!
    • Hello, has anybody any suggestions for gluten free options at LAX airport, specifically terminals 2 and Tom Bradley International?   I saw there's a Built Burger.  Has anyone been there?  Thank you!  
    • A mistake that many of, myself included, made! Don't feel bad about it, feel good that you've at least identified a possible cause. I was faced with a similar choice a few years ago and opted to go back onto gluten for a 'challenge' to see if I had celiac. I kept a food diary during this time and tracked the reappearance of symptoms, some gastro intestinal but primarily neurological. I tested negative for celiac much to my surprise, but the challenge confirmed gluten as an issue, so NCGS is best diagnosis I'm likely to get for now at least.  Your question re fructans is a good one and not easy to answer. The fact you've asked it suggests you've done some research and are aware of the unclear science once celiac is excluded. For what its worth I think that what may happen is that some people who get IBS relief from a gluten free diet are indeed correct to avoid the foods, but incorrect in identifying gluten as the cause.  They may actually be reacting to fructans, polyols, or other parts of the wheat,carbs rather than proteins.  However there are also well documented cases where gluten itself is the culprit, some more info on this here and I believe this is where I sit.   You need to decide what level of uncertainty you can live with. Medical assistance will depend on reintroducing gluten. If you do it with a food diary you may learn more about your reactions, maybe even be able to customise your diet to your own body. Most importantly, you would properly exclude celiac as a cause, which is important because its a serious condition and if you do have it, far better to know for both you and your family who may also want to be tested.  Finally, I collected some links and info here some time ago, it may be useful.  Best of luck Matt
  • Upcoming Events