• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

New To Living On A Gluten Free Diet And Having Celiac Disease
0

6 posts in this topic

Hello Everyone

I would like to get some advice on how to deal Celiac Disease. I was just told a week ago that I have Celiac Disease.

I am unsure of what I can and can't eat.

I am afraid of what it means to change my life at my age, my husxband is kinda freaking out a lot.

Anything that you can tell me would be very helpful...

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Check the plethora of links on the main page (www.celiac.com), look at the linked articles on the publications section of the forums, look for local support groups (more springing up every day!), prepare to freak out a whole bunch.

Really the freaking out is normal, happens all the time considering the sheer amount of knowledge you have to acquire to get the diet to work right (like: "no gluten ingredients" doesn't mean anywhere near the same as "gluten-free). Just acknowledge the freak out and move on. Things get better, a hell of a lot better. Whenever you have any specific questions or need to vent, post up on these boards or search through old threads. If it weren't for reading through all these experiences of others I'd be no where near as healthy as I am today.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bookmark this site - you will be coming to it alot! Better yet, make it your homepage for a while! ;)

I was diagnosed as Celiac 5 short months ago and they just happened to find it while ruling out lymphoma. It is a blessing that they found it quickly before much damage happened, but sometimes I get mad and angry that I have this. I'm sure if I had bad gluten reactions I would feel grateful, but it is what it is. You will experience a whole range of emotions during your journey. They are all normal. But first, you must find out what you can eat.

There are so many things on that list you can eat. Some of the things people are surprised I can eat are the right chocolate, ice cream (without cookies or such) and potatoes. :rolleyes: I know I shouldn't roll my eyes because gluten can hide in the craziest places, but potatoes w/ wheat? Come on!

For product placement I would like to recommend Udi's bread and bagels. Those two things seem to be the things people miss the most. Udi's bread comes close to the gluten version. If you can get some of that, you will be smiling. I also recommend shopping the "outside perimeter" of the supermarket. Fruits and veggies, gluten-free meats, yogurt, cheese. I do duck into the middle aisles for Rice/Corn pasta, and Pamela's All Purpose gluten-free Flour, but I stay away from everything else.

I would recommend seeing a nutritionist that knows about Celiac to help you out. If I had to do it over again I would have done that to save me time and energy. If you can't then this forum is totally the best and it's FREE! :)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bookmark this site - you will be coming to it alot! Better yet, make it your homepage for a while! ;)

I was diagnosed as Celiac 5 short months ago and they just happened to find it while ruling out lymphoma. It is a blessing that they found it quickly before much damage happened, but sometimes I get mad and angry that I have this. I'm sure if I had bad gluten reactions I would feel grateful, but it is what it is. You will experience a whole range of emotions during your journey. They are all normal. But first, you must find out what you can eat.

There are so many things on that list you can eat. Some of the things people are surprised I can eat are the right chocolate, ice cream (without cookies or such) and potatoes. :rolleyes: I know I shouldn't roll my eyes because gluten can hide in the craziest places, but potatoes w/ wheat? Come on!

For product placement I would like to recommend Udi's bread and bagels. Those two things seem to be the things people miss the most. Udi's bread comes close to the gluten version. If you can get some of that, you will be smiling. I also recommend shopping the "outside perimeter" of the supermarket. Fruits and veggies, gluten-free meats, yogurt, cheese. I do duck into the middle aisles for Rice/Corn pasta, and Pamela's All Purpose gluten-free Flour, but I stay away from everything else.

I would recommend seeing a nutritionist that knows about Celiac to help you out. If I had to do it over again I would have done that to save me time and energy. If you can't then this forum is totally the best and it's FREE! :)

Sorry to hear of your dx, but glad you know what to do. I was dx'd 5 months ago and have seen several nutritionists. The reason I say several is because I wanted to find the best consensus and advice. SO it is imperative that you find a good nutritionist. I also would suggest you find a Doctor of Functional medicine in your area. if you google Function Medicine you will learn what it is and then find one in your area. It is well worth it. My GI doc just told me to come back in 3 months... that was it... after going to other doctors I found out vit d deficiency as well as osteopenia. and I am a 49 yo male with significant bone loss as a result of undetected celiacs....

hang in there. it will take at least 3 months to start to see some positive changes. at least thats the way it went with me...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to hear of your dx, but glad you know what to do. I was dx'd 5 months ago and have seen several nutritionists. The reason I say several is because I wanted to find the best consensus and advice. SO it is imperative that you find a good nutritionist. I also would suggest you find a Doctor of Functional medicine in your area. if you google Function Medicine you will learn what it is and then find one in your area. It is well worth it. My GI doc just told me to come back in 3 months... that was it... after going to other doctors I found out vit d deficiency as well as osteopenia. and I am a 49 yo male with significant bone loss as a result of undetected celiacs....

hang in there. it will take at least 3 months to start to see some positive changes. at least thats the way it went with me...

Yes! Read, read, read! And then read some more! You get better information here from people who are actually dealing with celiac/gluten intolerance ... not a doc or dietition or nutritionist who mean well, but, just can't relate to all the physical, mental and emotional stuff!

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


Hello Everyone

I would like to get some advice on how to deal Celiac Disease. I was just told a week ago that I have Celiac Disease.

I am unsure of what I can and can't eat.

I am afraid of what it means to change my life at my age, my husxband is kinda freaking out a lot.

Anything that you can tell me would be very helpful...

Yes i can help you if you want it and I just find out not very long ago I have Celiac Disease and I know how freaking out it is well I have a list that you can get and can not eat.Fresh meat Fish and shellfish Poultry and game

Here is the list the food you can eat:

Vegetables Fresh herbs Fruit

Dried fruit Nuts Eggs

Cheese Cottage cheese (not cheese spreads) Milk (when newly diagnosed you may be lactose intolerant)

Dried beans, peas and pulses Vegetable oils, sunflower oil, olive oil Almonds, ground or whole

Rice, ground, long or short grain Rice cakes/crackers Rice flour (and other gluten free flours)

Yeast Cream of tartar Bicarbonate of soda

Sugar Dried peppercorns Cornflour (from the maize plant

Tamari soy sauce Marmite (only if made in the UK) Yoghurts (without crunchy bits)

Cider vinegar Wine vinegar Distilled vinegar

Sago Tapioca Millet

Quinoa Flax seed Corn Tortillas

Corn tacos Popcorn (check any coating) Homemade soups (not roux based)

Jelly (jello) Jam Marmalade

Honey Golden syrup Black treacle or molasses

Tea (check herb teas first) Fruit juice Fruit squash (not barley water

Xanthan gum (replaces "elastic" quality of gluten)

Gluten Free Vegetables and Fruit

As an accompaniment to main meals, or the meal itself if you are a gluten free vegan or vegetarian, it is nice to eat fresh vegetables and fruit that are in season.

All vegetables and fruit are gluten free, unless you add something to them, such as a sauce or coating.

The following table highlights which produce is available at different times of the year.

Beetroot Purple Sprouting Broccoli Asparagus Wild mushrooms

Cabbage Carrots Courgettes (Zucchini) Sweetcorn

Leeks Spring onions (Scallions) Mange Tout Beetroot

Onions New potatoes Globe Artichokes Sweetcorn

Brussels Sprouts Spring greens Garden Peas Cauliflowers

Shallots Lettuces Green beans Carrots

Parsnips Asparagus Cucumber Marrows

Swede Broad beans Lettuces Broccoli

Spinach Spinach Radishes Butternut squash

Curly Kale Rhubarb Watercress Turnips

Artichokes Peppers Cabbages

Pumpkin Tomatoes Parsnips

Apples Sweetcorn Celery

Pears Summer berries Leeks

Nuts Cherries Apples

Bananas (year round) Currants Pears

Oranges (year round) Plums Almonds

Melons Chestnuts

Apricots Elderberries

Grapes

Figs

Grains and baked foods containing gluten

foods containing gluten food labels gluten free diet free diet supplements

Bread and bread rolls Rye bread, pumpernickel Yorkshire pudding

Pretzels Cakes Stuffings (click here for gluten free stuffing recipes

Muffins Pastry or pie crust Pancakes (click here for gluten free almond flour pancakes

Biscuits or cookies Pasta - macaroni, spaghetti, etc. (Click for dishes made with gluten free pasta) Crispbreads

Bulgar wheat Durham Crumble toppings (click for a safe, tasty apple crumble topping)

Couscous Pizza (click here for a safe pizza dough recipe) Semolina

Scones Anything in breadcrumbs Some breakfast cereals(click here for a list of gluten free breakfast cereals)

All Bran Sponge puddings Breadcrumbed ham

Barley water drinks Malted drinks, such as Horlicks Muesli

Here is the food you should not have:

Foods containing hidden gluten

Other foods containing gluten could trick the unsuspecting newly diagnosed Coeliac sufferer into thinking they are safe. The list below shows things that should be checked.

Sausages - often contain rusk (and the machines used to make them are often cleaned out with bread) Luncheon meat - may contain fillers Blue cheeses (may be made with bread)

Gravy powders and stock cubes such as OXO cubes Matzo flour/meal Shredded suet in packs (flour is normally used to keep the strands separate)

Seitan (doesn't contain gluten, it IS gluten!) Hydrolyzed Vegetable Protein (HVP) Baked beans (there may be gluten in the tomato sauce)

Farina Meat and fish pastes Pates and imitation crab meat

Self basting turkeys Sauces - often thickened with flour Communion wafers

Soups - may be roux based (made with flour) Mustard - dry mustard powder contains gluten Instant coffee - may be bulked out with flour

Brown rice syrup Cheap brands of chocolate Potato crips/chips - some are OK, read the ingredients!

Soy sauce - only Tamari is OK Drinking chocolate Licorice

Chutneys and pickles Salad dressings Curry powder and other spices (can be bulked out with flour)

White pepper Malt vinegar Play Dough click here for a cornflour recipe

Supplements Some toothpastes Some lipsticks

Some pharmaceutical products

There is more if you want to know more information about you can look it up google Gluten-Free there is a lot of information about it and I hope this help

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      106,797
    • Total Posts
      932,501
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,282
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    lyoncallies
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi Michael and welcome The celiac diagnosis process can be a little confusing. Some time ago I tried to put together some info and links that may be of help:    The key point would be to stay on gluten until you and your doctors are satisfied that celiac has been excluded. In your case that may include another test with a more complete panel as CyclingLady says above. If you go gluten free independently during this time you risk invalidating the results and adding to uncertainty. The second suggestion would be that should you succeed in eliminating celiac as a diagnosis then you have nothing to lose from trying the gluten free diet. I tested negative on blood and endoscopy, but removing gluten resolved or greatly improved a whole load of symptoms including anxiety, depression and that feeling of not being right that you outline above.  I say greatly improved because I can still suffer from anxiety or depression, as anyone can, but if I do, they're nowhere near as severe as they were when I was consuming gluten.  In the meantime, one thing you could do is to keep a food journal to see if you can track any relation between what you eat and how you feel. It's good practice for if you later try the gluten free diet and you never know what you may learn.  This is a good site full of friendly help and advice. I hope you get the help you need  
    • “I was coming here before I was diagnosed with celiac disease, but after, it was one of the few places I could go to since they had gluten-free items,” ... View the full article
    • Good advice Ennis!  I would add baking and freezing some gluten-free cupcakes to have on hand, so that she is never left out.  Be sure to read our Newbie 101 tips under the coping section of the forum.  Cross contamination is a big issue,  If the house is not gluten free, make sure everyone is in board with kitchen procedures.   Hopefully, your GI talked about the fact that this AI issue is genetic.   Get tested (and your TD1 child).  TD1 is strongly linked to celiac disease.  About 10% of TD1's develop celiac disease and vice versa.  Get tested even if you do not display any symptoms.    http://www.cureceliacdisease.org/screening/ https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/diagnosing-celiac-disease/
    • What does weak mean?  Like you squat down and and you can not get back up?  Or are you fatigued?  When you said blood panel, was your thyroid tested?  Antibodies for thyroid should be checked if you have celiac.  So many of us have thyroid issues.  
    • We are not doctors, but based on the results you provided, you tested negative on the celiac screening test.  You could ask for the entire celiac blood panel to help rule out celiac disease.  The other IgA that was high?  It normally is given as a control test for the TTG IgA test (meaning if the celiac test results are valid).  In your case, the TTG IgA test works.  Outside of celiac disease, you might have some infection.  Discuss this with your doctor as he has access to your entire medical file.  I would not worry about it though over the weekend!  
  • Upcoming Events