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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Pots Pans And Dishes Sharing

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I've been gluten free for only 2 weeks but I get these moments of joint pain and lethargy. I'm wondering whether using the same dishes as my family (who still eats lots of dairy and gluten) can have traces of gluten or lactose? Anybody use their own dishes??

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I shared plates/bowls with my family when I was living at home, but I had my own pot, fry pan and cutting board, as well as wooden spoons and stuff the commonly touch gluten, like strainers. I cook in the same glassware as them without a problem, but I always scrub them before using them!

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What I hear is that nonstick and wood retain gluten, whereas plastic and stainless steel don't. I use the same dishes as my gluten- and dairy-eating fiance, but those are all porcelain, plastic, or metal. I have my own pots, pans, and cooking utensils.

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Ok, thanks. It probably came from using pots for rice. We also have a very bad dishwasher, I don't think it's safe of me to use any of the same dishes (unless glass) because there is often things sticking to the dishes after they are washed.

I'm glad I know now what has been causing this

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I see a lot of folks on this thread have covered a lot of what I was covering on your other thread. But I do want to reiterate that if you dip into a spread of any kind that someone else has dipped a knife in, and that knife has spread something on gluten, the spread would be contaminated.and you would be cc'd. Also, some soft plastics, e.g., cutting boards, scratch and retain gluten in the scratches.

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Also, it just might take longer than two weeks. That's not long gluten-free at all.

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Also, it just might take longer than two weeks. That's not long gluten-free at all.

Hmm what do you mean by this? Am I still going to get random moments of multiple re-occurring symptoms until I'm gluten free for a longer period of time? Detox of a sorts?

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I don't have an issue with gluten, but do have a severe egg allergy. I got angry with my husband for the way he was cooking eggs. He was putting them in my Corelle bowls and microwaving them with no added fat. That meant they were welded onto the bowls and I just could not get them clean. So I bought paper bowls and told him to use only the paper bowls.

I then began using paper plates to do prep work with food like chopping.

And then I took it a step further. We now use paper bowls and plates for pretty much everything. Yes, I know it's not all that green but I feel that it is safer for my daughter and I. We both have food allergies and they are not necessarily the same.

I did replace some things but somewhat by default. For example, my crockpot quit working. So I bought a new one. Also asked for as a gift, a Rachel Ray pasta pot. And used a gift card to buy a very large skillet. And I bought daughter her own toaster.

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First of all, I don't trust a dishwasher to truly get anything starchy off of a plate/pan once it has dried on. Yes, I am a major prewasher. I don't necessarily use soap, but everything is scrubbed pretty well before it even goes into the dishwasher. We share anything (nonporous) that I can scrub with steel wool. The only things that I have separate at my house are a couple of nonstick skillets. (Yes, I have separate toasters, cutting boards, strainers)

On a side note, one Thanksgiving I was at my BIL's house. I was helping cook (so I could keep an eye on everything ;) ) I got a big pot out of the cabinet for the potatos. Saw the big starch ring 1/3 the way down from the top of the pot. I asked my BIL if this was his pasta pot. He replied "yes" . . . did the "wow, never noticed that it leaves that ring" (and did reiterate that it had been thing that I was even remotely suspicious about . . . I'm lucky that my family (both mine and my husband's) are not overly sensitive to me getting bossy around food and dish/cookware.

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Hmm what do you mean by this? Am I still going to get random moments of multiple re-occurring symptoms until I'm gluten free for a longer period of time? Detox of a sorts?

Not detox so much as it takes time for inflammation to heal. Early on, you could be getting gluten, or you could have just had a rough day and some of the leftover inflammation causes some joint pain and fatigue. It's great to be really careful with the diet until you figure out your level of sensitivity, but do give your body a month or two to really settle down.

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I am about to embark on a DISCIPLINED gluten-free diet (finally). So, I have some pots which the whole family uses for everything. Should I just throw them away and get new ones OR, give them a really good scrubbing with soap (and any other cleaning agent you could recommend) and then make sure that no one other than me touches it?

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I am about to embark on a DISCIPLINED gluten-free diet (finally). So, I have some pots which the whole family uses for everything. Should I just throw them away and get new ones OR, give them a really good scrubbing with soap (and any other cleaning agent you could recommend) and then make sure that no one other than me touches it?

What kind of pots are they: stainless steel, nonstick, etc? The stainless steel can be cleaned effectively but nonstick retains gluten if it has ever been used to make a gluten-containing meal. For some reason the nonstick material binds gluten and permanently contaminates it.

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[N]onstick retains gluten if it has ever been used to make a gluten-containing meal. For some reason the nonstick material binds gluten and permanently contaminates it.

Please provide an authoritative source for this claim. The only problem I have ever heard of is scratched coatings trapping gluten inside the scratches (a problem not unique to nonstick).

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Please provide an authoritative source for this claim. The only problem I have ever heard of is scratched coatings trapping gluten inside the scratches (a problem not unique to nonstick).

I honestly don't have one. I was warned by my GI doc about this. I never bothered to look because I heard from the doc and also from somewhere else on the web (don't remember where, but maybe this forum?)

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Most GI doctors are not very educated on the details of the diet. I would not accept that claim without scientific evidence to back it up.

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Most GI doctors are not very educated on the details of the diet. I would not accept that claim without scientific evidence to back it up.

Normally I agree. This doc was wonderful though, and actually deserves the respect docs are sometimes automatically given.

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I would rather be safe than sorry. I got rid of all my old pans and got new ones. Just my opinion.

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I would rather be safe than sorry. I got rid of all my old pans and got new ones. Just my opinion.

That's why I let my husband, who still eats gluten, use all the old non-stick pans I had from My Life Before and I use all his stainless steel pots and pans. Honestly, they're probably all scratched anyway.

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Question how do you know if being sick is from the gluten comming of the pan or spoon or the food and if it comes from the spoon how do you know that being sick 5 days from the day u ate from the spoon is from the spoon that day or something else..its so confusing..at least when its one thing ur allergic to one food you know what food u ate that had it..but with this celiac how do u know..am I making sense?

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Most GI doctors are not very educated on the details of the diet. I would not accept that claim without scientific evidence to back it up.

My DR didn't warn me of anything. My dietition did warn me to change my toaster and strainer. I chose to change my dishes, pots, panson myown.Id been in severe pain for a year and was desperate! I'm 7 months in and have found things along the way that bothered me. At 4 months or so I found out my lipgloss had wheatgerm oil in it and I was told it was gluten-free. gluten-free, I have found is a learning experience and I think that is what the posters are telling you. I CC myself like crazy until I saw my dietiton who only sees gluten-free Celiacs. I have had to admit to myself that corn really bothers me! I've given up alot, but given up corn has really helped..I miss my candy etc.....

gluten-free living/eating is not easy at first. I was told the first 6 months are the hardest! They were right. I feel I'm getting the hang of it now! Keep at it and keep a food journel, you will be able to see how foods affect you. I went to pain 24/7 to some pain free moments..to some days almost feeling normal. However, I eat a whole foods diet and am "free" on a lot of things. I look at it this way..Im giving my body time to heal and then perhaps..I can eat dairy etc agian.. hang in there..I know it's not easy when you are starting out!

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I have a couple of pots that I use for gluten free stuff only and as I cook only gluten-free meals it works fine. There are some pots that my son may use for anything gluten but I pretty much keep then separate. The only time I use the "gluten" pots is at holiday when I scrub them withing an inch of their life! They are stainless so are ok. I threw out all old non-stick. I know there are mixed feelings on the ok/not ok - but I didn't feel comfortable.

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