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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Can A Child "outgrow" Celiac?
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No. It's as simple as that. Like you said, people can have silent, latent, or asymptomatic Celiacs

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Can a child

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You should encourage him to at least get the blood test done. There may actually be health issues you are not aware of as not all are comfortable discussing health issues with others. Also some people think the stomach issues that often come with celiac are 'normal for them'. Celiac can impact any organ so it isn't just tummy issues that are seen. Headaches, moodiness, joint and muscle pain, and much more can be part of the celiac picture. I should mention that since he was diagnosed as a young child you and all his first degree relatives should be screened also.

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ALL EXCELLENT points above AND TRUE!!!

one does NOT outgrow Celiac, period. & YES, even if it is not affecting his gut, it can be destroying another part of his body, like his brain or heart, etc, etc

and maybe it's possible that he was misdiagnosed 50 years ago...

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One can't outgrow celiac disease, no.

I would guess the test was accurate considering that your son improved on a celiac diet. And there is definitely a chance of some severe problems at this point.

My father had no gut symptoms, but his hips deteriorated, his spine developed arthritis, his lungs had problems, etc...

It also increases his chances of having more serious complications to diseases and illnesses because he'll be immuno-compromised.

This is a website with 300 symptoms/signs of celiac disease that might help you and your son look at his health and decide if he should get tested again, or simply readopt the gluten free diet.

Can a child

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Yes, celiac disease CAN be outgrown. People around here think of celiac as permanent but it's not always the case. I'm a little frustrated because I can't seem to turn up the research article I read recently showing remission in some childhood celiacs.

Thing is, celiac remission is relatively rare, while "silent" celiac is more common. "Silent celiac" is where a person has no symptoms, but does have musocal damage and malabsorption. Osteoporosis is common, as are deficiencies in B vitamins that can lead to neurological disorders. If I were you, I would press him to get the testing done, because the consequences of silent celiac can be so severe.

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Renission refers to the response of the treatment. It does not mean that the disease/condition is cured.

I believe this to be true because unfortunately, as in the case of my MIL, she is being treated for the third time for cancer. Her first was in the 80's, then early 2000, and now. The cancer is being found in the same area and has now moved to her bone. In between these times she was being tested to make sure she was in remission and she was. Yes,I know cancer is different from celiac.

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Yes, celiac disease CAN be outgrown. People around here think of celiac as permanent but it's not always the case. I'm a little frustrated because I can't seem to turn up the research article I read recently showing remission in some childhood celiacs.

Thing is, celiac remission is relatively rare, while "silent" celiac is more common. "Silent celiac" is where a person has no symptoms, but does have musocal damage and malabsorption. Osteoporosis is common, as are deficiencies in B vitamins that can lead to neurological disorders. If I were you, I would press him to get the testing done, because the consequences of silent celiac can be so severe.

While remission can occur, doctors refer to it as a 'honeymoon' period, damage is still being done. This remission was the reason why doctors years ago commonly thought that celiac was a childhood disease and that children could outgrow it. It can take a long time for symptoms to reoccur and they are not always the GI symptoms that are usually thought of but can be damage to others organs.

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Back 50 years ago gluten sensitivity was usually diagnosed by eliminating wheat, barley and rye from the diet and noticing the improvement. Your son may have had a wheat allergy and this may have cleared up as he got older. He may have had non-celiac sprue (Leaky Gut Syndrome) which cleared up on the gluten free diet, especially if he was gluten-free at 5 months when the intestinal wall matures and prevents food antigens from entering the body. If he had autoimmune Celiac Disease it may have become silent but there may have been some continuing damage to his small intestine even tho he had no symptoms.

I suggest having him tested by the genetic DNA tests which would tell if he is predisposed to developing Celiac Disease and Leaky Gut Syndrome. Also the Molecular Serology test (Prometheus Labs) could give the same information. There are several labs online which can do the DNA tests, I used Enterolab.com. The serology test is ordered by Drs.

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Back 50 years ago gluten sensitivity was usually diagnosed by eliminating wheat, barley and rye from the diet and noticing the improvement. Your son may have had a wheat allergy and this may have cleared up as he got older. He may have had non-celiac sprue (Leaky Gut Syndrome) which cleared up on the gluten free diet, especially if he was gluten-free at 5 months when the intestinal wall matures and prevents food antigens from entering the body. If he had autoimmune Celiac Disease it may have become silent but there may have been some continuing damage to his small intestine even tho he had no symptoms.

Probably not a wheat allergy. He was hospitalized the first time for dehydration at one month of age. I had tried nursing him but didn't have enough milk, so he was on whatever formula we used back then. I have no idea what was in it.

At six months he was anemic so the Dr. gave me a liquid iron supplement to try. One-fourth of a teaspoonful was enough to give him diarrhea. Again, I don't know what was in it. Back then you didn't ask questions of your Dr. and you didn't get copies of lab work. You just followed orders.

Last night I gave him copies of a few pages from Dr. Green's book to read. Since he is very health conscious, he will probably go to his Dr. for a celiac panel. At least I hope so.

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Yes, celiac disease CAN be outgrown. People around here think of celiac as permanent but it's not always the case. I'm a little frustrated because I can't seem to turn up the research article I read recently showing remission in some childhood celiacs.

Thing is, celiac remission is relatively rare, while "silent" celiac is more common. "Silent celiac" is where a person has no symptoms, but does have musocal damage and malabsorption. Osteoporosis is common, as are deficiencies in B vitamins that can lead to neurological disorders. If I were you, I would press him to get the testing done, because the consequences of silent celiac can be so severe.

If you're in remission you haven't outgrown it. It's just lurking in the shadows and you don't know when it will come back. We patients report so many non GI issues that cleared up with gluten free diet, so it's likely that the "remission" is just for GI symptoms and the person can be presenting with other things the docs aren't linking to celiac.

Allergy is a whole different game. Allergy is a histamine response. With allergy shots you can condition your body not to react to an allergen and yes allergies can be outgrown. Celiac is autoimmune and you cannot outgrow it even if it does go in remission.

I had it my whole life and got diagnosed at 40. There were times I felt good though and I believe it was in remission. But it always reared its ugly head again.

As for the OP's son, I would like to know his entire health picture. Does he stumble or bump into things? Does he have asthma, allergies or sinus infections? Anxiety? Joint pain? There are so many non GI symptoms of celiac.

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I see that it has been a year since I started this thread. In June my son did EnteroLab testing which showed him to gluten and casein sensitive. With his personality type, I think he will be able to maintain a gluten-free diet even though he doesn

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Ha ha I never looked at the original date! Glad he's doing better and has answers.

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