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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Soy; Bad Or Ok?
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9 posts in this topic

Is soy ok for celiacs to eat or is it one of those individual things like oatmeal?

Also, is being gluten sensitive have the same damaging effects on your villi as

a full blown celiac has? I dont get as sick as alot of people on here when glutenated

but I think I could be still getting the same damage as a full blown celiac, of which

I still consider myself a celiac. Sometimes the pain on my side is so bad I can barely

walk straight up.

Thanks.....Derrick

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Soy is gluten-free, but some people, including some celiacs, are unable to eat it. It is one of the FDA's top eight allergens, so it must be clearly disclosed on labels in the USA.

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Soy is an individual thing, Derrick. There do seem to be a lot of us who do not tolerate it, but gluten and soy sensitivities do not go hand in hand. Some people think it's bad for everyone because of its hormonal effect but soy is generally considered to be a safe edible.

As for damage from gluten, gluten has different damaging effects in each individual. To say it is worse or not as bad - well, it's hard to quantify. Would you rather have D and/or C with cramps, or gluten ataxia and brain fog, or have it silently attack some other part of your body like your thyroid? Or suddenly end up with lymphoma? You will never know until it shows up what damage it is doing. And it doesn't matter if you have a diagnosis or not, if you are sensitive to it it is harming you.

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Thanks for the replies. Love this board, really helps me.

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Soy SAUCE is not always gluten free. Some of it is made with wheat (check the label, it has to be disclosed in the US). Soy ALONE does not have gluten in it. However many do react to soy in various ways. I did a poll asking how many people here also avoid soy and the variety of reasons for avoiding it was wide. Some people might have an allergy, some might get the same symptoms from it as they get from glutening, some avoid it because they also have thyroid issues.

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Soy SAUCE is not always gluten free. Some of it is made with wheat (check the label, it has to be disclosed in the US). Soy ALONE does not have gluten in it. However many do react to soy in various ways. I did a poll asking how many people here also avoid soy and the variety of reasons for avoiding it was wide. Some people might have an allergy, some might get the same symptoms from it as they get from glutening, some avoid it because they also have thyroid issues.

thanks......soy sauce kills me just like a big mac would. found san j organic tamari sauce, good substitute.

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Soy is an individual thing, Derrick. There do seem to be a lot of us who do not tolerate it, but gluten and soy sensitivities do not go hand in hand. Some people think it's bad for everyone because of its hormonal effect but soy is generally considered to be a safe edible.

It is my understanding that, technically, soy has never been granted official GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status by the FDA. I will have to track down my source on that, though. Maybe Weston Price.. Price Pottinger.. Maybe Mercola.. Can't find it at present.

CS

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It is my understanding that, technically, soy has never been granted official GRAS (generally regarded as safe) status by the FDA. I will have to track down my source on that, though. Maybe Weston Price.. Price Pottinger.. Maybe Mercola.. Can't find it at present.

CS

A little common sense, please. The GRAS lists are for additives and flavorings, not for whole foods that are obviously edible. I doubt carrots or chicken have been granted official GRAS status either. Anyone trying to invoke lack of GRAS status for a whole food like soy has an axe to grind and if that's the best argument they can come up with, they're in sad shape.

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A little common sense, please. The GRAS lists are for additives and flavorings, not for whole foods that are obviously edible. I doubt carrots or chicken have been granted official GRAS status either. Anyone trying to invoke lack of GRAS status for a whole food like soy has an axe to grind and if that's the best argument they can come up with, they're in sad shape.

I consider myself educated now. Thank you. It is just something that stuck in the back of my mind from my early ventures into understanding gluten-free and all my other problems. One of those statements that, contextually, can be made without fibbing in order to put forth an agenda but isn't really true either. I guess that would mean I don't have GRAS status either.. thank heavens! (I will have to tell my wife I am dangerous now.)

CS

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