• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Mddonalds And Their New Oatmeal
0

9 posts in this topic

So i sent McDonalds an email questioning about their new oatmeal.. unfortunately this was their crappy response... just wanted everyone to know.. I did eat this Saturday morning and considering today is Wednesday and i'm a little bloated.. i may have had a reaction.. not sure yet.. sometimes it takes a few days to figure out if i was glutened or not.

Hello Christina:

Thanks for your interest in McDonald's menu.

McDonald's no longer maintains a list of products that are considered gluten free. We do, however, provide extensive nutrition and ingredient information for our nationally offered menu product on our website. We update the information on our website (http://www.mcdonalds.com/usa/eat.html) frequently as we receive new information from our product suppliers. We encourage you to read our ingredient statements and make personal decisions that meet your specific dietary needs.

Again, thank you for contacting McDonald's and we hope to have the opportunity to serve you again soon.

Jessica

McDonald's Customer Response Center

ref#:7489088

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


So i sent McDonalds an email questioning about their new oatmeal.. unfortunately this was their crappy response... just wanted everyone to know.. I did eat this Saturday morning and considering today is Wednesday and i'm a little bloated.. i may have had a reaction.. not sure yet.. sometimes it takes a few days to figure out if i was glutened or not.

Hello Christina:

Thanks for your interest in McDonald's menu.

McDonald's no longer maintains a list of products that are considered gluten free. We do, however, provide extensive nutrition and ingredient information for our nationally offered menu product on our website. We update the information on our website (http://www.mcdonalds.com/usa/eat.html) frequently as we receive new information from our product suppliers. We encourage you to read our ingredient statements and make personal decisions that meet your specific dietary needs.

Again, thank you for contacting McDonald's and we hope to have the opportunity to serve you again soon.

Jessica

McDonald's Customer Response Center

ref#:7489088

Oats are not considered safe unless they are certified gluten free, and even then they are a debatable choice for celiacs. Since McDs wouldn't confirm it, I would take the oatmeal as not being safe...steer clear.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong, but I thought that oats were often contaminated with wheat during processing, and that even if they are not the protein structure is so similar to gluten that some celiacs can't tolerate it anyways.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way that oats are grown, harvested, transported and in some cases processed leaves them full of wheat gluten. There are gluten-free oats and some Celiacs react to them, too.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I for one can't hold it against McDonalds for not calling any of their products Gluten Free. I seem to recall a story that they were sued by the parents of a Celiac child. They claimed she got sick eating the fries, which were supposed to be gluten-free.

Not to start a fries debate (for the thousanth time), but I believe the fries are indeed gluten-free.

I'm surprised any company labels products gluten-free. It seems no matter how gluten-free something is, someone will think they reacted to it.

best regards, lm

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:


The oatmeal debate doesn't have to take place on this product, since one of the ingredients is "barley malt extract"

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the nutrition information on their oatmeal:

Oatmeal

Whole grain rolled oats, brown sugar, food starch-modified, salt, natural flavor (plant source), barley malt extract, caramel color.

Diced Apples

Apples, calcium ascorbate (a blend of calcium and vitamin C to maintain freshness and color).

Cranberry Raisin Blend

Dried sweetened cranberries (sugar, cranberries), California raisins, golden raisins, sunflower oil, sulfur dioxide (preservative).

Light Cream

Milk, cream, sodium phosphate, datem, sodium stearoyl lactylate, sodium citrate, carrageenan.

CONTAINS: MILK.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites




Gluten free oats are outrageously expensive. No restaurant is going to produce an oat product with gluten free oats unless it is a specifically designated gluten free entree/item . . . which, as mentioned by others, would still cause a problem for some celiacs/glutent intolerants.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cranberries with sunflower oil - another "iffy" thing because of how the oil may have been processed.

But Barley Malt right on the ingredients?! give me a break ! That not gluten free !

It's fairly well known in the general knowledge base when talking about oats, for celiacs, that oats need to be certified gluten free to be safe - and they are for some celiacs. In moderation. Others can't tolerate them.

People who insist on eating at McDonald's are taking a risk with cross contamination. Besides all the buns and biscuits flying around, they use a gluten bearing seasoning on some of their hamburger patties, which would mess up the grill for the meat. It's okay to take risks if that is how you want to be, but I get annoyed with people I've seen (not here) but on a few other sites insisting the stuff is perfectly safe and gluten free, re various fast food items. Here, if they do it, I will point out relevant nutritional information that the item is likely cross contaminated or actually LISTED as having a gluten ingredient. I think there is either a level of denial going on, or marketing. I have eaten fries (cautiously) at another local, smaller ff chain, where they slice the potatoes there and use a dedicated fryer, and they understand the allergy thing at the counter when you talk to them. I was okay, but it is still slightly risky.

McDonald's isn't there to appeal to the specialty consumer, but to the masses. This oatmeal is going to be a great thing for normal people, at least.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,339
    • Total Posts
      935,564
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,998
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    Con Smith
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • I can't help thinking that all of this would be so much easier if the doctor I went to 10 years ago would have done testing for celiac, rather than tell me I probably should avoid gluten. He was looking to sell allergy shots and hormone treatment, he had nothing to gain from me being diagnosed celiac. I've been messing around ever since, sort-of-most-of the time being gluten free but never being strict about it. I really feel like three months of eating gluten would do my body a lot of permanent damage. I've got elevated liver enzymes for the third time since 2008 and no cause can be found which might be good, I guess. I wonder if it would be reasonable to do the HLA testing first, to decide if I really need to do the gluten challenge. If the biopsy is negative, that is. Squirmingitch, love your tag line about dogs in heaven. We lost the best dog ever last December. I sure hope all my dogs are there waiting for me!
    • Most (90%-95%) patients with celiac disease have 1 or 2 copies of HLA-DQ2 haplotype (see below), while the remainder have HLA-DQ8 haplotype. Rare exceptions to these associations have been occasionally seen. In 1 study of celiac disease, only 0.7% of patients with celiac disease lacked the HLA alleles mentioned above. Results are reported as permissive, nonpermissive, or equivocal gene pairs. From: http://www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/Clinical+and+Interpretive/88906  
    • This is not quite as cut & dried as it sounds. Although rare, there are diagnosed celiacs who do not have either of those genes. Ravenwoodglass, who posted above, is one of those people. I think she has double DQ9 genes? Am I right Raven?  My point is, that getting the gene testing is not an absolute determination either way.
    • Why yes it is! jmg and myself are NCIS, I mean NCGS specialist/experts or is it NCGI people ourselves. posterboy,
    • LilyR, jmg has given you good resources/links. I used to have constant issues with ear infections that went away when I went gluten free. And recurrent bronchitis they I never have now. NCGS can cause low grade inflammation that you don't realize at the time . .. till you stop eating gluten. That said have you been checked for a UTI infection.  It is not uncommon to have low grade fevers when you have one. My friend at work recently had a bad spell of health and the only symptom she complained about before coming down with a bird flu virus was a low grade persistent fever (not for a few months but for a few years). The last time I had bronchitis before it became pneumonia I had a low grade fever in the few months before my pneumonia diagnosis. Keep looking is my advice to you.  Low grade fevers are fighting off an infection . .  sometimes we don't know why until other symptom's present themselves. I do know that when I went gluten free most of my chronic health issues got better.  I can only assume it (gluten) was triggering inflammation in my body. I hope you find out what is the cause of your fever and that being gluten free helps it. ****** this is not medical advice just some of the ways going gluten free helped me and some possible other causes of a low grade fever that have happened to myself or others that I know of. posterboy,
  • Upcoming Events