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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

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OK, here’s a fun one for you. I just went gluten-free two weeks ago after being diagnosed as a celiac, and I’ve had a couple of “accidents” while learning the ropes. My immune system hasn’t really had a chance to recover yet, so I keep coming down with things.

The latest is laryngitis, picked up after flying to Chicago. I’m now under doctor’s orders not to talk for at least a week, maybe two. I just started learning how to explain my diet to people, and now I can’t talk at all! My partner is speaking for me, calling manufacturers, etc. He’s being wonderful and patient, but he’s not great at playing charades all day and it’s hard to get I’m just really frustrated—can’t talk, can’t eat, might not even be able to work.

If they send me home from work, I’ve already used up my sick days (dealing with celiac symptoms) so it would be unpaid. I’ve got a stack of medical bills, prescriptions to fill, gluten-free food to buy, student loan payments, a recently laid-off partner and NYC rent to pay! And I don’t even know how long it will be before I start feeling better. Can’t do much to bring in extra income without talking to anyone, either.

This also comes on top of getting some bad news about loved ones dying of cancer. I’m afraid I’m just going to go crazy. I’m seeing a therapist (had to type my half of my session last night!) so I have help, but I’m still having trouble coping. Any advice?

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Speaking as someone who has gone through life with similar problematic circumstances including deaths, layoffs, relationship/living arrangement breakups, multiple health problems and other bad situations, I can only advise you to take things one step at a time, and try to cultivate patience. If you do this you will get through it all. You may want to try something to take your mind off these problems; it could be by doing something that you already enjoy, or something new. Get out and take in a museum, concert, lecture, etc. - New York has a lot to offer - much of it is FREE. Exercise works wonders, and is also free. I’d strongly recommend focusing your thoughts on how much BETTER you’re going to feel after being gluten-free for a long stretch.

Good Luck

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The first few weeks/months can be rough, but you will slowing start noticing improvements in your health. You also shouldn't get as sick so often once your body heals. Just be patient and try to get through this. I know what it is like and it can be discouraging, but things will be better before you know it. In the meanime, I would take celiachaps' advice and do things that you really like to do. Walking, running, sports, biking, sight-seeing, movies, music, ect. Personally, I love to get outside for a walk, listen to my favorite music, and watch a good movie. These things should help to get your mind of things for the moment.

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