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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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celiac crusader

Food Allergies And Weight Loss

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I find it interesting that now that I have figured out all of my food allergies (gluten, lactose, nuts, and anything from the onion family which includes garlic), AND I made absolutely certain to omit these items from my diet, that I no longer have stomach distress (which my brain tends to interpret as hunger). Because if this, I now am able to eat normal portions, not snack, and am losing 2 pounds a week. Five years ago when I found out about my gluten allergy and went on a careful and very healthy whole foods type diet, I was only able to lose 3 pounds a month. Now that I have removed onions and garlic (and their powders added all over the place to processed foods and frozen dinners), I can finally be away from my food focus. My stomach always bothered me and I was always looking for something healthy but low-cal and satisfying. With onion and garlic removed, my life has changed! I wanted to post this for the mom whose children display symptoms of Celiac Disease but whose biopsies are negative. My reflux and primarily heartburn and indigestion problems came from my lactose intolerance. That was the first food allergy I discovered at 52. Could finally stop single-handedly supporting the Pepto-Bismal manufacturer! Gluten gave me severe pain at nighttime and the doctor figured that out for me at age 56. Last year, when I started having more abdominal pain, I had a small-bowel follow-through test and it showed nothing sinister. Several months later I started wondering about the onion/garlic connection, which is much more common than I would have realized. That turned out to be a turning point! Anyway, I am one happy camper now, health-wise, but pretty bummed cooking-wise. I have found I can substitute the very mild Nappa cabbage, finally cut, for onions to give a twang to the taste of things AND it cooks down to something that looks like an onion. I used it in my gluten free stuffing over Xmas and everyone thought it tasted great! Horseradish is a good sub for garlic.

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Yikes! giving up garlic and onions in my house would be even harder than giving up gluten!

Can you tell me what led you to suspect onions and garlic? I would never have suspected those.

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