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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

What's With Doctors?
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9 posts in this topic

Yesterday I went to a new orthopedic doctor about a foot problem. He looked at my paperwork and said "I see you have Celiac. What do you take for it?" This was a very young (think Doogie Howser) doctor who must have been in med school fairly recently. Don't they teach them about Celiac? OK, he's not a GI specialist, but I would think he would pick up a little basic info somewhere along the way! Is this unusual? Am I being unreasonable?

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Yesterday I went to a new orthopedic doctor about a foot problem. He looked at my paperwork and said "I see you have Celiac. What do you take for it?" This was a very young (think Doogie Howser) doctor who must have been in med school fairly recently. Don't they teach them about Celiac? OK, he's not a GI specialist, but I would think he would pick up a little basic info somewhere along the way! Is this unusual? Am I being unreasonable?

I once read on here that doctors get the equivalent of maybe one 30 minute lecture on celiac in med school if they get that at all. With all the other major illnesses (like heart disease, cancer, etc) they have to take entire courses. So the chance of getting a doctor that knows about celiac is slim. That's no excuse of course. I tend to think that if a doctor looks at your chart, sees celaic and doesn't have any clue what that is they should look it up for a refresher first. Is there any chance he was asking if you take vitamin supplements or something? I guess I would just be glad he was NOT my GI or primary doctor. :unsure:

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Reminds me of a joke. What do you call someone who finishes last in their class in medical school? Doctor :) In all seriousness sadly there are many out there who are uninformed about Celiac. I did actually have a pleasant experience the other day while eating out for my husband's b-day. Our waiter was wonderful and seemed to know so much about Celiac disease as I was thanking him for all of his help he said he is in nursing school and they just spent a week studying Celiac disease. Good to know someone is getting educated. :)

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Yesterday I went to a new orthopedic doctor about a foot problem. He looked at my paperwork and said "I see you have Celiac. What do you take for it?" This was a very young (think Doogie Howser) doctor who must have been in med school fairly recently. Don't they teach them about Celiac? OK, he's not a GI specialist, but I would think he would pick up a little basic info somewhere along the way! Is this unusual? Am I being unreasonable?

And this is exactly why it takes us so long to get a correct diagnosis.

I hope you took a few minutes to get him up to speed. Doctors are really busy and I doubt he'd take the time to look it up later.

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I just spent four days in a regional hospital here in Florida and the Dietary Department has NO CLUE what gluten is! They claimed to serve me a "gluten free diet", but the first breakfast offered 2 pieces of whole WHEAT toast, a box of Rice Crispies which lists the 4 ingredient as "malt flavoring", etc., etc. They just got angry with me and insisted that everything was gluten free. I asked to speak to the REGISTERED DIETICIAN and was told that she wasn't available on weekends! But she refused to talk with me on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, too, while I continued to get gluten in most meals. The nurses were definitely on my side and the charge nurse raised hell with dietary, but that just made them mad at all of us. When I mentioned all this to my doctor, she said "The Dietary Department in this hospital is from another planet! Watch out!" So, I paid for the food they put in front of me and ate the gluten free food that my dear husband brought me. I will never go to that hospital again, and they will hear more from me!!!!

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I had to stay overnight in hospital a couple of months ago, when I told the nurses I couldn't eat gluten, they offered me All Bran or toast for breakfast. They genuinely had no idea and were tryig to help me.

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And while we're at it, what's with pharmacists? I wanted to find out if any of my Rx drugs had gluten and talked with the pharmacist at WalMart the other day. Told him I had Celiac and wanted it noted in his computer. He said "I've heard of Celiac, but what is it?" I gave him a 5 minute crash course.

Keep educatin' 'em, gang!

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I just spent four days in a regional hospital here in Florida and the Dietary Department has NO CLUE what gluten is! They claimed to serve me a "gluten free diet", but the first breakfast offered 2 pieces of whole WHEAT toast, a box of Rice Crispies which lists the 4 ingredient as "malt flavoring", etc., etc. They just got angry with me and insisted that everything was gluten free. I asked to speak to the REGISTERED DIETICIAN and was told that she wasn't available on weekends! But she refused to talk with me on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, too, while I continued to get gluten in most meals. The nurses were definitely on my side and the charge nurse raised hell with dietary, but that just made them mad at all of us. When I mentioned all this to my doctor, she said "The Dietary Department in this hospital is from another planet! Watch out!" So, I paid for the food they put in front of me and ate the gluten free food that my dear husband brought me. I will never go to that hospital again, and they will hear more from me!!!!

You need to document this in a letter. Send them in separate envelopes addressed to: ( by title if you can't find a name). Chief Financial Officer, chief Executive Officer, Head of Nursing, legal Department, head of dietary, head of clinical dietician, chief of Staff, & your doctor. If you want, send them to every director of every hospital department - medical records, maintenance, housekeeping, radiology, lab, labor & delivery, etc. You will get the attention of at least one of these people. The others will send it to dietary or legal. You might send it to the head of Finance & the Billing Supervisor with a little note about wanting a $30 a day refund for the food you were medically unable to eat. Be sure to note right at the beginning of the letter the fact that serving you this food would make you very ill ( bold letters) If you know an attorney, even if they don't deal with malpractice, cc them in big print if they are willing ( this is what your BIL is finally good for).

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If you know an attorney, even if they don't deal with malpractice, cc them in big print if they are willing ( this is what your BIL is finally good for).

LOLOL LOLOLOLOL that made me choke on my tea! my *good* BIL is an electrician. the rest are not attorneys!!! thanx for a great laugh :D

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