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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Resurfacing Cast Iron
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10 posts in this topic

When my man moved in with me, we decided to use only my gluten-free cookware, and if we needed something else we'd buy it. Until now. He cleaned out his garage and really wants to use this old cast iron pan. I know cast iron is porous and really hard to clean, but he had an idea.... he read you could sandblast and resurface the pan. So, he took it to his shop and took off a nice thick layer of pan. The pan is now a dull silvery color, the usual black cast-iron look is gone. He'd like to re-season it now and use it.

My concern is that the porous nature of the plan will render it unsafe. It is my understanding that the pores open when it's warm and close when it's cold. When I look at the pan, it looks fairly clean, but it seems to me that the holes in it may have been there before. He swears that they weren't and that it's a new layer with a new set of holes that has never seen wheat flour. But, I really have no way of knowing....I didn't see it before, and I don't have any idea what cast iron looks like under a microscope or if this could be an issue.

I do realize I may be over-reacting to not want to use it, but I'm still very sick and don't want to take chances. I'm two years very, very strictly gluten-free (including all non-food products), but am still very much in recovery with terrible fatigue.

He's usually very cool about not using things I'm wary about even if I'm over-cautious, but he's very insistent on keeping this pan.

What are your thoughts? Has anyone done this?

I also don't know if it's safe in general to sandblast and resurface a cast iron pan without having it professionally done. Will I be eating shards of metal or something? Do I need to make it turn black before use?

By the way, I went to the Lodge Cast Iron website to see what the pans come oiled with. FYI, it's soy based. I'm sure the severely soy allergic would want to know that! :blink:

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Your signature says you are gluten light?

Maybe that is old, and you are now 2 years gluten free and still having fatigue.

A lot of people have reseasoned their old cast iron pans and have been fine with using them.

It seems to me that him sandblasting a whole layer of cast iron off his pan would have totally eliminated any old burned on gluten and along with the additional layer of metal. I would think that would make it safe to use, as long as you re-season it.

But then again, I have never heard of anyone taking this step. That is some kinda love for the cast iron pan. And some kinda love for you too!

I think he went over and above what most peope do to get rid of gluten and re-season their cast iron pan. I can't imagine how a speck of gluten could have survived it.

I would probably feel comfortable with that and use it. But if you don't feel comfortable, just let him use it for his food.

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The usual way people handle their cast iron pans is to leave them in the oven during a self-clean cycle, and then reseason them. I would think the sandblasting would have taken off more than the self-clean cycle so you should be just find.

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to re-season the pan put a light coat of bacon grease or vegetable oil on it ( light coat) and place in over w/high heat till it stops smoking (will smoke alot). You may have to repeat this step since the pan has been sand blasted.

I always hand wash my cast iron skillet and place on range to dry immedialy then add light coat of veg oil and smoke it some. Take a paper towel and wipe the bottom surface some, and a few drops of oil and work that in.

doing this, I've not had to re-season in the oven ever.

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wow. i'm marrying him. :D

does that work, leaving the pans in the self-cleaning oven when you clean it? because (i, too, have a cast iron man) this will make today a very nice day. also, he will clean the oven :D he will be so happy! i wasn't sure if that would work. but he re-season(s)/(ed) the pans every time we used them.

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Your signature says you are gluten light?

Maybe that is old, and you are now 2 years gluten free and still having fatigue.

I took that to mean she was gluten light at the time of her testing

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The sandblasting should be more than enough to get rid of any gluten. You don't have to worry about pores opening and gluten getting stuck in them either. Cast iron pans have a textured surface generally and that texture with all it's little valleys and pits is what could make it hard to get rid of gluten. But sandblasting removes the whole surface layer anyway so not a problem. Seasoning the pan just requires a coat of oil and some baking. The oil turns to carbon and that carbon layer coats the cast iron and gives it that black color. Also the carbon makes it less sticky, long as you have a little oil in the pan. Hubby done a great job of cleaning the pan for you. Just don't let him clean your china that way. :D :D :D :D

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I took that to mean she was gluten light at the time of her testing

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Just don't let him clean your china that way. :D :D :D :D

HAHA!

:lol:

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