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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Dandy Blend Coffee Substitute
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3 posts in this topic

I am interested in trying Dandy Blend coffee substitute. However it is made out of barley & rye. They claim it is gluten free. But I'm still nervous about it. Has anyone tried this product or done any research about it? Here is what they claim on the Dandy Blend website:

Dandy Blend is made of the water-soluble extracts of five ingredients--three roots and two grains. The ingredients are roasted separately and them combined in prescribed proportions, placed into a vat, covered with hot water, and allowed to steep for a prescribed period of time. The water, with the soluble portions of all the components, is separated from the grounds and spray dried. The remaining fine brown powder left after the water is driven off is what becomes Dandy Blend. All the gluten and other water-insoluble substances are left behind in the grounds to be composted.

Hence, there is no gluten in Dandy Blend. Goosefoot Acres periodically submits samples of Dandy Blend to Elisa Technologies Laboratory in Florida, one of the most respected gluten testing labs in the United States for analysis, and so far, every test has come back gluten-free.

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I am interested in trying Dandy Blend coffee substitute. However it is made out of barley & rye. They claim it is gluten free. But I'm still nervous about it. Has anyone tried this product or done any research about it? Here is what they claim on the Dandy Blend website:

Dandy Blend is made of the water-soluble extracts of five ingredients--three roots and two grains. The ingredients are roasted separately and them combined in prescribed proportions, placed into a vat, covered with hot water, and allowed to steep for a prescribed period of time. The water, with the soluble portions of all the components, is separated from the grounds and spray dried. The remaining fine brown powder left after the water is driven off is what becomes Dandy Blend. All the gluten and other water-insoluble substances are left behind in the grounds to be composted.

Hence, there is no gluten in Dandy Blend. Goosefoot Acres periodically submits samples of Dandy Blend to Elisa Technologies Laboratory in Florida, one of the most respected gluten testing labs in the United States for analysis, and so far, every test has come back gluten-free.

Whoa! I would be extremely suspicious of this if I were you. It is basic science that you can't test whether something is gluten-free. Most ELISA tests I've heard of are accurate to a specific gluten content. IE, less than 20 or 10 or 5 parts per million. There is no test that confirms something is "gluten-free". That is impossible to test for. Anyway, regardless of that, the risks due to cross contamination, etc. just seem WAY too high. That's just my opinion though. Maybe somebody here has had good luck with it?

-Ryan

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Wouldn't touch the stuff.

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