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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
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Would You Eat Gluten-Free Baked Items From A Shared Bakery
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   24 members have voted

  1. 1. Would you eat a gluten free baked good made in a shared bakery?

    • Yes
      1
    • No
      14
    • Possibly, after inquiring about and reviewing their processes
      9

Please sign in or register to vote in this poll.

10 posts in this topic

I'm just curious how many users would eat something that was made with gluten free ingredients if it was made in a bakery where they use wheat flour; We have a cupcakery around here with gluten-free options but they specialize in regular cupcakes.

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I did the other day :) But the place I got it from has been around for ages and seems to understand about CC and making sure the cakes are 100 % gluten-free :)

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Maybe. I guess i would ask them about how they are made. & like, look at how they store them in the store. like are they on the same tray with gluten ones. I went to a coffee shop with some gluten-free pastries but they are wrapped in clear plastic to keep them safe.

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i was a baker for 4 years and a chef for over 20.

every few days, in a bakery, a thick layer of flour grows on every surface that you can write your name in w/ your finger. every shelf collects a layer of flour from just the airborne flour that settles.

it's everywhere. every time someone scoops some flour into a mixer, or fills a bin with flour, poof, a huge cloud of flour fills the room, and settles everywhere. if you want to eat something from that environment, good luck to you.

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Absolutely not and, I don't even have a diagnosis. I won't anything out of a shared kitchen where flour isn't used much less where it is used. The only shared kitchen I would even consider would be BJ's or Outback because of how stringent they are when it comes to the issue of Celiac. However, I have a huge can't/won't eat list so that pretty much rules them out as well.

In my opinion, a shared bakery is just begging for trouble. I don't know how there wouldn't be a cross contamination situation.

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Never. I don't care how careful they think they are, it's like the one person here said -- a layer of flour just collects everywhere. Think about how it was the last time you used regular flour. I remember letting it "poof" into the bowl too hard and a cloud of flour dust would rise up into the air. Now multiply that by umpteen cupcakes/cakes/whatever else made in a commercial bakery.... no way! :ph34r:

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What scares me about seeing bakeries having "gluten-free options" is that I'm scared the staff really only thinks that using gluten-free flour is what makes something gluten-free.

I was talking with someone last week who owns a restaurant and she herself is gluten intolerant. She said that while she tries to educate her staff when it comes to preparing food for people who request gluten-free, she knows that they aren't always as careful as they should be and have made mistakes.

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No way, no how. I can't even enter Panera Bread without getting sick. No way I would trust baked goods made in a shared kitchen.

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I did once and NEVER AGAIN!!

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There is one local bakery where I can eat. We speculate that there must be a family member with allergies because they are very allergy conscious. (They make limited gluten-free items and a variety of egg/dairy/nut free items.)

However, another shop gets me sick. I know based on their practices that I should not even try to eat their gluten-free cookies, but they also make fruit bars that are segragated. They must have that layer of flour floating around, though, because that was a bad idea.

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