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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Nova Scotian Celiac

Tips For A New Celiac In Halifax, Ns - Canada!

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Hey everyone!

I'm very new to this (1 week into my diagnosis) and am wondering if there are any Atlantic Canadians out there (or even better yet - from Halifax).

I'm trying to figure out the best places in the area:

a) To purchase gluten free products

B) To purchase gluten free baked goods

c) To eat out (Restaurants) - as much variety as possible

Thanks :)

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Welcome!

I'm also from the Halifax-Dartmouth area and gluten-free so I'll do my best to help you out. As for purchasing gluten-free things, Superstore and Sobeys both have a GREAT selection of items. You can find breads, doughnuts, tortillas, ect in the natural section. Same thing goes for Pete's Frootique (Spring Garden Rd) and Planet Organic (Quinpool rd). The best bread band I found in these store's is definitely Udi's, although O'Doughs bread is also fantastic. If you frequent the Seaport market, Schoolhouse Gluten Free makes the most amazing baked items--breads, muffins, cookies, cakes. Their Focaccia rounds are probably the best thing I've ever ever had!

There are definitely so many restaurants in the area offering gluten-free options, but my favorite would have to be the Wooden Monkey. It was the first place I ever got to have gluten free pizza and gluten free beer. Also, if you're a fan of sushi, the wait staff at Hamachi house are EXTREMELY helpful, and even have gluten-free soy sauce. Boston Pizza also has a gluten free crust. If you really want to see the whole list of places though, I found so many of my options through the celiac scene website. It breaks down areas, and lists all the gluten-free restaurant options. It pretty much made it possible for me to be able to eat out!

Good luck! Hopefully I didn't overwhelm you too much.

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Hi,

I live in Cole Harbour and I eat out quite a bit. I can add a few more restaurants to the list:

Jamieson's in Cole Harbour - the owner is gluten sensitive and is very aware. They also carry gluten-free beer and have an excellent flourless cake.

Brooklyn Warehouse (Windsor St) also carries gluten-free beer.

Pizzatown is a chain which has a very good gluten-free pizza and is the same price as their regular pizza.

Janes on the Common and Jack Asters also have gluten-free menus.

I have found that Halifax restaurants in general are very knowledgeable and many can suggest gluten-free options.

Cheers,

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Thanks, guys!!

That's awesome :) And great to find some locals too

Hi,

I live in Cole Harbour and I eat out quite a bit. I can add a few more restaurants to the list:

Jamieson's in Cole Harbour - the owner is gluten sensitive and is very aware. They also carry gluten-free beer and have an excellent flourless cake.

Brooklyn Warehouse (Windsor St) also carries gluten-free beer.

Pizzatown is a chain which has a very good gluten-free pizza and is the same price as their regular pizza.

Janes on the Common and Jack Asters also have gluten-free menus.

I have found that Halifax restaurants in general are very knowledgeable and many can suggest gluten-free options.

Cheers,

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Hey Halifax area Celiacs, I am looking for a store that sells Robin Hood gluten-free flour. Any know of what specific stores stock this item?

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They must carry it at the Superstore on Braemar Drive in Dartmouth.  I was there today and saw a shelf label for it, although they did not have any in stock today.  I saw it at another Superstore but I can't remember which one, probably Portland Street or Young Street.

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