• Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Celiac.com E-Newsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsCeliac.com E-Newsletter

  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.
  • Celiac.com Sponsor:
    Celiac.com Sponsor:

Low Testosterone, Hypothyroid And Adrenal Issues
0

33 posts in this topic

I see, very interesting! The innate immunity you're referring to, I suppose it's the same as Dr Fasano mentions in the link below? "Their immune reactions were different, too [compared to Celiacs]. In the gluten-sensitive group, the response came from innate immunity, a primitive system with which the body sets up barriers to repel invaders."

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704893604576200393522456636.html

Yes, that's the study. The role of an innate IL-15 response as the first step in celiac is also pretty well documented. The model is gluten -> IL-15 through innate immunity -> interferon-gamma and NK cells -> inflammation and apoptosis of epithelial cells -> abnormal antigen presentation of gliadin by DQ2 or DQ8 -> anti-gliadin antibodies -> recruitment of CD8+ cells to the intestine to "kill" the gluten -> (insert uncertain mystery step) -> TTG antibodies -> celiac.

Thing is, it's looking more and more like just the IL-15 is enough to cause some folks a heap of trouble. Some research suggests that the loss of intestinal integrity is more a result of the innate immunity than autoimmunity.

Scratched teflon is bad news anyway. Sounds like it was time for nice, fresh pots. :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ads by Google:
Ads by Google:


Yes, that's the study. The role of an innate IL-15 response as the first step in celiac is also pretty well documented. The model is gluten -> IL-15 through innate immunity -> interferon-gamma and NK cells -> inflammation and apoptosis of epithelial cells -> abnormal antigen presentation of gliadin by DQ2 or DQ8 -> anti-gliadin antibodies -> recruitment of CD8+ cells to the intestine to "kill" the gluten -> (insert uncertain mystery step) -> TTG antibodies -> celiac.

Thing is, it's looking more and more like just the IL-15 is enough to cause some folks a heap of trouble. Some research suggests that the loss of intestinal integrity is more a result of the innate immunity than autoimmunity.

Scratched teflon is bad news anyway. Sounds like it was time for nice, fresh pots. :)

Ok, very interesting model! If it's true that IL-15 is enough to cause problems, that would explain why some of my symptoms (IgA deficiency, elevated liver enzymes, subfertility, low platelet count, borderline anemia etc) point to celiac disease although I don't have elevated gluten antibodies.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had an MRI with a contrast agent yesterday and everything was fine. Not that I was expecting anything else but it's always nice to know my pituitary is ok.

I have a thyroid ultrasound tomorrow. I also asked my doc to schedule a testicle ultrasound - might as well cover all bases while I'm at it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Had a thyroid ultrasound today which came back normal. I wonder if a biopsy is needed if the ultrasound didn't show anything? I could get one if I want to, but there's obviously a risk associated with it... Any advice?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad to hear everything is checking out OK. The time I had nodules on my thyroid, I was not referred for biopsy after a non-worrying thyroid ultrasound. You'll have to go with the advice of your doctors though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, so you had nodules that weren't visible on the ultrasound? Great... I can't really use any of the advice from my doctors since they are clueless. What bothers me is the inherent risk of having a biopsy and whether or not is warranted in my case. If I have nodules, being gluten-free would help, right? If I don't have nodules, I'm still staying gluten-free to see if issues resolve.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's an update with what I've been up to the last two months:

1. Abdomen ultrasound showed vascular changes on the liver. This is in combination with elevated AST and Bilirubin, though hepatitis blood tests were negative. I'm not sure of the clinical significance of these vascular changes and neither is my doctor. I'm going to make sure I see a better doc on this one.

2. Testicular ultrasound showed microcalicifications and small hydroceles, but I was told they were so small it was clinically insignificant. I have, however, requested a referral to a urologist to make sure a specialist has a look at the results given the fact that I am subfertile.

3. Sleep study ruled out sleep apnea, but I might have narcolepsy as I always keep waking up constantly through the night. I will see a specialist about this as well in a couple of months.

4. I've been in contact with a support group for people with Addison's disease and posted my insulin tolerance test results from 2004 and according to the people on that board, I failed the test, suggesting primary adrenal failure. The confusing part is that the doctor that ordered the test in 2004 wrote in my medical journal that the result was perfectly normal.

5. I'm still gluten-free (2 months now), but I can't say I feel that much better. I'm not constipated anymore, that's about it, but I still have incredibly low energy all the time which is quite noticeable when I work out. It's summer time here so the cold intolerance isn't a problem right now, but I know what's going to happen when the winter starts creeping up...

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/1/2011 at 2:22 PM, landslide said:

Here's an update with what I've been up to the last two months:

 

1. Abdomen ultrasound showed vascular changes on the liver. This is in combination with elevated AST and Bilirubin, though hepatitis blood tests were negative. I'm not sure of the clinical significance of these vascular changes and neither is my doctor. I'm going to make sure I see a better doc on this one.

 

2. Testicular ultrasound showed microcalicifications and small hydroceles, but I was told they were so small it was clinically insignificant. I have, however, requested a referral to a urologist to make sure a specialist has a look at the results given the fact that I am subfertile.

 

3. Sleep study ruled out sleep apnea, but I might have narcolepsy as I always keep waking up constantly through the night. I will see a specialist about this as well in a couple of months.

 

4. I've been in contact with a support group for people with Addison's disease and posted my insulin tolerance test results from 2004 and according to the people on that board, I failed the test, suggesting primary adrenal failure. The confusing part is that the doctor that ordered the test in 2004 wrote in my medical journal that the result was perfectly normal.

 

5. I'm still gluten-free (2 months now), but I can't say I feel that much better. I'm not constipated anymore, that's about it, but I still have incredibly low energy all the time which is quite noticeable when I work out. It's summer time here so the cold intolerance isn't a problem right now, but I know what's going to happen when the winter starts creeping up...

Hello, I am in the exactly same situation like yours. Did you see any results of being gluten free.?

I may have some solution to your situation.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
0

  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      107,080
    • Total Posts
      934,204
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      64,678
    • Most Online
      3,093

    Newest Member
    kriskreyes
    Joined
  • Popular Now

  •  

  • Topics

  • Posts

    • How does that happen!? Congratulations!
      (But still curious!)
      Plumbago
    • The sluggishness, hair loss, and weight gain made me think of hypothyroidism, but then the diarrhea throws me  - unless the two things are unrelated. Coincidental but unrelated. I looked up positive lactoferrin test on labsonline:
      Lactoferrin is a stool (fecal) test that is used to detect inflammation in the intestines. Intestinal inflammation is associated with, for example, some bacterial infections and, in people with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), it is associated with disease activity and severity. The test may be ordered to distinguish between IBD and non-inflammatory disorders and to monitor IBD disease activity. Also the bands refers, if I'm not mistaken, to neutrofils and as others have said, usually this means that there is an infection or inflammation present and the bone marrow is producing more WBCs and releasing them into the blood before they are fully mature. I'm sure you would have mentioned medications you were taking if you or a medical provider thought they may be affecting you negatively. Let us know if there is anything else we can do. You have a lot of people here ready to help. Plumbago   ETA: I see the doctor chalked something up to your occasional use of ibuprofen. Sorry, I could not figure that one out, and how it had much to do with your symptoms.    
    • http://hypothyroidmom.com/10-nutrient-deficiencies-every-thyroid-patient-should-have-checked/ Maybe this article can help.   Malabsorption of nutrients can make the body do weird things.  
    • Thank you!  I'll check it out.
    • They are N/A because they were not tested for on those dates. Also, I have never been on thyroid medication so I can rule that possibility out. Is it possible that TSH fluctuates before hypo presents itself? It has been 4 months since my last test and a few symptoms that I thought would resolve themselves by now on my gluten-free diet have persisted which is making me question these thyroid numbers further. 
  • Upcoming Events