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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   09/30/2015

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease? - list blood tests, endo with biopsy, genetic test and enterolab (not diagnostic) Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes Where can I buy gluten-free stuff? Support this site by shopping at The Celiac.com Store.

Enterolab Results - Should I Get Additional Tests Done?
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Hi,

I just got my Enterolab test results. Definitely have issues with the most common allergens. I knew I felt better once I went gluten free despite having a negative celiac test! Anyway, my question to you guys who are much more knowledgeable -- based on the results below should I have other tests done while they still have my specimen? Do I need to do the gluten antibody test -- how is that valuable?

Also, I LOVE eggs! How bad is it to continue eating them with the test result below?

Thank you.

B) Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 108 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow

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I can be totally wrong about this. I don't have medical credentials.

If you can eat eggs and feel good, continue eating eggs.

If you eat eggs and feel bad, try to figure out if it is the white (more commonly the allergin) or the yolk. (In my case, it's the yolk.) I still occasionally enjoy gluten-free pancakes or homemode baked items without causing havoc on my system when I have a egg yolk in something baked.

I still have boiled eggs (not as often as I used to, though) and sort of skin the egg white off for tuna salad and lettuce salads. I still have fried egg for breakfast on the weekend. I just eat the white. I have one happy dog since developing an egg yolk allergy. (It popped up in skin prick testing.)

My allergist said it would be good to do an egg challenge. I told him I have enough challenges right now.

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i'd go with eggs in things first like baked goods. our daughter had IgE tests done and her egg was 1.7 range 0-4, o being not allergic. based on her results she should only have a mild reaction according to the allergist. i had egg salad, washed the spoon and she grabbed it and all it did was touch her chin and she instantly broke out in hives

so numbers aren't always a clear indication of how you will react

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Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 108 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Not a medical professional, but I do think this says "no ick say on the gluten- ay." ;)

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I can be totally wrong about this. I don't have medical credentials.

If you can eat eggs and feel good, continue eating eggs.

If you eat eggs and feel bad, try to figure out if it is the white (more commonly the allergin) or the yolk. (In my case, it's the yolk.) I still occasionally enjoy gluten-free pancakes or homemode baked items without causing havoc on my system when I have a egg yolk in something baked.

I still have boiled eggs (not as often as I used to, though) and sort of skin the egg white off for tuna salad and lettuce salads. I still have fried egg for breakfast on the weekend. I just eat the white. I have one happy dog since developing an egg yolk allergy. (It popped up in skin prick testing.)

My allergist said it would be good to do an egg challenge. I told him I have enough challenges right now.

I hear ya on having enough challenges! Thanks for your reply....

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Not a medical professional, but I do think this says "no ick say on the gluten- ay." ;)

no doubt! no more gluten for me...so thankful i found this out at a time when gluten free is readily available. ;)

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You did have a test for autoantibodies to gluten

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 108 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Gliadin is one of the proteins in gluten. Fragments of gliadin start off the production of antibodies. Your results are quite high. I think this would mean that you have an allergy to wheat and also have non-celiac sprue but do not have autoimmune celiac disease. Non-celiac sprue is one type of gluten sensitivity and some times referred to Leaky Gut Syndrome.

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If I were you, I would ask for the anti-TTG from Enterolab if it isn't to expensive. It is a better celiac test than fecal anti-gliadin. I would also ask if they have genetic testing for DQA1 *0505. They didn't last time someone checked, but it can't hurt to ask.

Based on your genetic results it is about 60% likely that you have DQA1 *0505, because you have DQB1 *0301 and they are often inherited together. DQB1 *0202 and DQA1 *0505 combine to make the high-risk celiac gene called DQ2.5 trans. It would be useful to know, because if you have DQ2.5 and gluten intolerance there is a pretty good reason to stay carefully gluten-free.

If you aren't feeling better gluten free, I'd look at casein because MANY celiacs are casein-sensitive. There is no harm in removing soy and eggs from your diet and challenging. IgA testing really isn't very predictive of food intolerance, so you almost always have to check with diet.

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If I were you, I would ask for the anti-TTG from Enterolab if it isn't to expensive. It is a better celiac test than fecal anti-gliadin. I would also ask if they have genetic testing for DQA1 *0505. They didn't last time someone checked, but it can't hurt to ask.

Based on your genetic results it is about 60% likely that you have DQA1 *0505, because you have DQB1 *0301 and they are often inherited together. DQB1 *0202 and DQA1 *0505 combine to make the high-risk celiac gene called DQ2.5 trans. It would be useful to know, because if you have DQ2.5 and gluten intolerance there is a pretty good reason to stay carefully gluten-free.

If you aren't feeling better gluten free, I'd look at casein because MANY celiacs are casein-sensitive. There is no harm in removing soy and eggs from your diet and challenging. IgA testing really isn't very predictive of food intolerance, so you almost always have to check with diet.

Thank you! I have eliminated dairy this week and finally my DH is clearing up!!!! I did a little research and learned that DH is often caused by both gluten and dairy intolerance. I previously had read it was only gluten and didn't understand why it wasn't clearing up now that I'm gluten free. So glad to figure this out...

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If I were you, I would ask for the anti-TTG from Enterolab if it isn't to expensive. It is a better celiac test than fecal anti-gliadin. I would also ask if they have genetic testing for DQA1 *0505. They didn't last time someone checked, but it can't hurt to ask.

Based on your genetic results it is about 60% likely that you have DQA1 *0505, because you have DQB1 *0301 and they are often inherited together. DQB1 *0202 and DQA1 *0505 combine to make the high-risk celiac gene called DQ2.5 trans. It would be useful to know, because if you have DQ2.5 and gluten intolerance there is a pretty good reason to stay carefully gluten-free.

If you aren't feeling better gluten free, I'd look at casein because MANY celiacs are casein-sensitive. There is no harm in removing soy and eggs from your diet and challenging. IgA testing really isn't very predictive of food intolerance, so you almost always have to check with diet.

I also just learned I have autoimmune thryoid disease. Thyroid levels are still fine but I have an enlarged thyroid/benign nodules are present and very high level of thyroid antibodies. I will do the anti-TTG test to determine if gluten is the cause of the autoimmune thyroid disease...

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I also just learned I have autoimmune thryoid disease. Thyroid levels are still fine but I have an enlarged thyroid/benign nodules are present and very high level of thyroid antibodies. I will do the anti-TTG test to determine if gluten is the cause of the autoimmune thyroid disease...

Putting together a series of papers, I'm pretty sure that autoimmune thyroid disease is more linked to basic gluten intolerance rather than needing to really be celiac. It's been shown that gluten intolerance produces a cytokine called IL-15 that inflames both gut and thyroid. Also, the selenium deficiency from absorption problems plays into the thyroid inflammation. I've strung together rather a lot of scientific papers to arrive at this conclusion so please forgive me for writing this without citations. It would take me a half hour or more to dig them all out.

This is the most recent one, but it doesn't explain the IL-15 and gluten intolerance connection.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21169670

Also if you do have DH, you need no further testing. Nothing causes that except celiac disease. TTG is still interesting, but probably not necessary.

I'm also really glad to hear going off casein helped you. The diet is sort of a pain (I've done it) but getting your health back is so worth it!

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Putting together a series of papers, I'm pretty sure that autoimmune thyroid disease is more linked to basic gluten intolerance rather than needing to really be celiac. It's been shown that gluten intolerance produces a cytokine called IL-15 that inflames both gut and thyroid. Also, the selenium deficiency from absorption problems plays into the thyroid inflammation. I've strung together rather a lot of scientific papers to arrive at this conclusion so please forgive me for writing this without citations. It would take me a half hour or more to dig them all out.

This is the most recent one, but it doesn't explain the IL-15 and gluten intolerance connection.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21169670

Also if you do have DH, you need no further testing. Nothing causes that except celiac disease. TTG is still interesting, but probably not necessary.

I'm also really glad to hear going off casein helped you. The diet is sort of a pain (I've done it) but getting your health back is so worth it!

Thank you...Please provide links to more of your papers if you can, I would like to read more about this as it is all so new to me.

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Putting together a series of papers, I'm pretty sure that autoimmune thyroid disease is more linked to basic gluten intolerance rather than needing to really be celiac. It's been shown that gluten intolerance produces a cytokine called IL-15 that inflames both gut and thyroid. Also, the selenium deficiency from absorption problems plays into the thyroid inflammation. I've strung together rather a lot of scientific papers to arrive at this conclusion so please forgive me for writing this without citations. It would take me a half hour or more to dig them all out.

This is the most recent one, but it doesn't explain the IL-15 and gluten intolerance connection.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21169670

Also if you do have DH, you need no further testing. Nothing causes that except celiac disease. TTG is still interesting, but probably not necessary.

I'm also really glad to hear going off casein helped you. The diet is sort of a pain (I've done it) but getting your health back is so worth it!

I had the Anti TTG test done and just got the results yesterday....Looks like my autoimmune thryoid disease is all related to autoimmunity triggered by gluten. Results below. Thanks for the suggestion, it has all come full circle now. I will be gluten free for life!

Tissue Transglutaminase Stool Test

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 24 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

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Well, I'm sorry you got stuck with our difficult diet but glad to hear you got some answers.

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Well, I'm sorry you got stuck with our difficult diet but glad to hear you got some answers.

Thank you. And I just noticed that you have listed in your signature "bi-polar disorder declared in remission by a suprised psychologist."

I read yesterday that undiagnosed/untreated autoimmune thryoid disease results in people vacillating between hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism (despite what a blood test from any one given day might yield) and so often being misdiagnosed as bipolar! Unreal.

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Thank you. And I just noticed that you have listed in your signature "bi-polar disorder declared in remission by a suprised psychologist."

I read yesterday that undiagnosed/untreated autoimmune thryoid disease results in people vacillating between hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism (despite what a blood test from any one given day might yield) and so often being misdiagnosed as bipolar! Unreal.

Yes, and my autoimmune antibodies did not appear until 2008, eight years after the psych trouble started. There was no way the Hashimoto's could have been diagnosed. I have read that the antibodies can take many years to appear in the blood with autoimmune thyroid disease.

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